2014 Maroondah Logo RGB.jpg

 

 

Councillor

(as addressed)

 

 

The next Council Meeting will be held in the Council Chamber, Braeside Avenue, Ringwood, on Monday 29 April 2019, commencing at 7:30pm and your presence is requested.

 

 

Yours faithfully

SKozlows.jpg

 

Steve Kozlowski

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

Note:

This meeting is being streamed live on the internet and recorded.

Every care is taken to maintain privacy and attendees are advised they may be recorded.

 

Logo2

Council Chamber
is fitted with a Hearing Aid Induction Loop

 

Switch Hearing Aid to ‘T’ for Reception

 

City Offices

Braeside Avenue, Ringwood, 3134

Postal

PO Box 156, Ringwood 3134

DX 38068, Ringwood

Telephone

1300 88 22 33

 

 

Facsimile

Email

Web

 

Service Centres

Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS): 131 450

National Relay Service (NRS): 133 677

(03) 9298 4345

maroondah@maroondah.vic.gov.au

www.maroondah.vic.gov.au

 

Croydon: Civic Square

REALM: 179 Maroondah Hwy, Ringwood

 


 

 

 

 

 

GRANT MEYER
ACTING DIRECTOR STRATEGY & COMMUNITY 
 


ORDER OF BUSINESS

1.       Prayer

2.       Acknowledgment of Country

3.       Apologies  

4.       Declaration of Interests

5.       Confirmation of Minutes of the Ordinary Council Meeting held on Monday 18 March 2019 and the Special Council Meeting held on Monday 8 April 2019.

6.       Public Questions

7.       Officers’ Reports

Director Corporate Services

1.       Attendance Report                                                                                                    5

2.       Reports of Assembly of Councillors                                                                         7

3.       Councillor Representation Reports                                                                        10

4.       Proposed Discontinuance and Sale of Road And Reserve

           at 193 Dorset Road Croydon                                                                                 12

5.       Sale Of Discontinued Right Of Way - 4A Kitchener Road Croydon                      16

6.       Municipal Association of Victoria State Council Meeting - Motions                       21

7.       Council Policy - Councillor Expenses, Support and

          Reimbursement Policy                                                                                            24

8.       Councillors Quarterly Expense and Reimbursement Report -

          January to March 2019                                                                                           27

Director Operations, Assets & Leisure

1.       Capital Works Report 2018/2019 - Period Ending 31 March 2019                        30

Acting Director Strategy & Community

1.       Maroondah Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2018-2020                                 36

2.       Draft Disability Policy and Action Plan 2019-2021                                                 39

3.       Maroondah Neighbourhood Character Study Review

          2018-19: Implementation Recommendations                                                        43

Director Development & Amenity

1.       Municipal Fire Management Plan                                                                           54  

8.       Documents for Sealing  

9.       Motions to Review   

10.     Late Item

11.     Requests / Leave of Absence

12.     In Camera

Director Corporate Services

1.       Instruments of Appointment and Authorisation  

 


Director Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Attendance Report

Item 1

 

Purpose

To provide an opportunity for Councillors to report on Council activities undertaken since the last Ordinary Meeting of Council and forthcoming ward activities.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

Not Applicable

Issue / discussion

It is intended that the Mayor and Councillors be given the opportunity to present a verbal or written report updating Council on the activities they have undertaken in their role as Councillors and forthcoming ward activities.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

It is appropriate that Councillors formally report to Council upon the activities they have undertaken in their role as Councillors.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE REPORTS AS PRESENTED BY

COUNCILLORS

 


Director Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Reports of Assembly of Councillors

Item 2

 

Purpose

To present the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings at the City Offices Ringwood, usually two weeks prior to the formal Council Meeting, and to note the issues discussed.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

An Assembly of Councillors, as defined under the Local Government Act 1989 [s.3], is a planned or scheduled meeting, comprising at least five (5) Councillors and one (1) member of Council staff, that considers matters that are intended or likely to be:

 

·        the subject of a decision of the Council; or

·        subject to the exercise of a delegated function, duty or power of Council

Examples of an Assembly of Councillors may include:

 

·        Councillor Briefings (which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings),

·        On-site inspections,

·        Consultative Meetings with residents, developers, consultants,

·        Panel Hearings conducted under s223 of the Act,

·        Meetings with local organisations, Government Departments, statutory authorities, and local politicians

Issue / discussion

As part of decision making processes at Maroondah, it is essential that Councillors are briefed on a range of issues which come before Council for consideration.  As a means of providing this information, Assembly of Councillors briefings are conducted.

 

Assemblies are also attended by Council Officers, and sometimes other specific advisors, to provide Councillors with a detailed knowledge and understanding of issues under consideration to a level of detail that would inhibit timely decision-making, that would not be possible in an open Council meeting, where decision-making related debate is governed by strict meeting procedures.

 

The intent of this report is to present the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings, and to note the items discussed.  This information is already available to the public upon request in accordance with the Local Government Act [s.80A].

 

This report and attachments formally table the information items previously covered by Councillors.

 

The ‘Public Record’ of the Assembly of Councillors briefings held on 18 March 2019 and 8 April 2019 is attached for information.

 

The items contained therein were noted.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

Assembly of Councillors briefings are important forums for advice and discussion, on what are often complex issues facing the municipality, in the lead up to formal decisions being made by Councillors at Council Meetings.  At Assemblies, or outside them, Councillors also have the opportunity of requesting additional information to assist in the decision making process.

 

It is appropriate that the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings at the City Offices Ringwood, usually two weeks prior to the formal Council Meeting, be noted at a formal meeting of Council.


 

 

Attachments

1.

2019 March 18 - Assembly of Councillors Public Record

2.

2019 April 08 - Assembly of Councillors Public Record

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE PUBLIC RECORD OF THE ASSEMBLY OF COUNCILLORS BRIEFINGS HELD ON 18 MARCH 2019 and 8 APRIL 2019

 


Director Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Councillor Representation Reports

Item 3

 

Purpose

To receive and note the following meeting minutes.

·        Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee (MDAC) held on 7 March 2019

·        Maroondah Arts Advisory Committee (MAAC) held on 27 February 2019

·        Metropolitan Local Government Waste Forum (MLGWF) held on 21 February 2019

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable.

Background

As part of Council's commitment to the principles and practice of good governance, it is appropriate that Councillors and the Community are formally updated on the actions and activities of the various organisations bodies/advisory groups upon which it is represented.

Issue / discussion

Council is represented on numerous Boards and Organisations. Appointments are made annually by Council at the commencement of the new Mayoral term.

 

Crs Spears and Dib are Council’s representatives on the Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee (MDAC).

 

Crs Spears, Graham and Symon are Council’s representatives on the Maroondah Arts Advisory Committee (MAAC).

 

Cr Symon is Council’s representatives on the Metropolitan Local Government Waste Forum (MLGWF).

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

 

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

 

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

It is appropriate that Councillors and the Community are formally updated on the actions and activities of the various organisations bodies/advisory groups upon which Council is represented.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee (MDAC) Meeting Minutes - 7 March 2019

2.

Maroondah Arts Advisory Committee (MAAC) Minutes - 27 February 2019

3.

Metropolitian Local Government Waste Forum (MLGWF) Minutes - 21 February 2019

4.

Metropolitian Local Government Waste Forum Meeting Summary - 21 February 2019

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES MINUTES OF THE following Committes

1.       Maroondah disability advisory committee (Mdac) held on 7 march 2019

2.       Maroondah arts advisory committee (maac) held on 27 february 2019

3.       metropolitian local government waste forum (MLGWF) held on 21 February 2019

 

 


Director Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Proposed Discontinuance And Sale Of Road And Reserve At 193 Dorset Road Croydon

Item 4

 

Purpose

To authorise commencement of the legislative procedures pursuant to the Local Government Act 1989 (Vic) (Act) to consider discontinuing the road abutting 193 and 193A Dorset Road Croydon, as contained in certificate of title volume 10171 folio 287 being the land shown as ‘Road R1’ on the plan of subdivision no. PS 314897W (Road) and the sale of the land as contained in the certificate of title volume 10171 folio 286 being the land on the plan of subdivision RES 1 PS 314897W (Land).

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community.

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered. Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes, and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive, and         accountable.

8.2     Ensure responsible and sustainable management of Maroondah resources, assets,       infrastructure, and natural environment.

Background

Council is the registered proprietor of the Road and the Land on the registered plan of subdivision no. PS 314897.

 

In 1993, Lot 1 LP 86687 then known as 193 Dorset Road Croydon, was subdivided into 2 lots which created the plan of subdivision no. PS 314897W. This subdivision created 2 small reserves and a road parcel, in favour of City of Croydon.

 

In July 2018, lots 1 and 2 on PS314897 known as 193 and 193A Dorset Road Croydon, were sold and the new owner applied for a planning permit to subdivide the properties into 22 lots.

 

Statutory Planning employees noted the 2 small Council reserve and the road parcel at the entrance of both properties at 193 and 193A Dorset Road Croydon.

 

Discussions with Councils Statutory Planning department suggested that Road and Land could form part of the new Plan of Subdivision at 193 Dorset Road Croydon, as they serve no purpose to Council.

 

The Road is only utilized by the owner and serves as common property, and the Land forms part of the front landscaping of both properties.

 

The road parcel is 96.1 sqm and the reserve parcels total 8 sqm.

 

If the Road is discontinued, Council proposes to sell the Road and the Land to the owner of 193 and 193A Dorset Road Croydon.

Issue / discussion

Council’s internal service areas were consulted seeking their comments and all agreed with the proposal.

 

Proceeding with this proposal will be in Council’s best interest, as it removes the maintenance and responsibility of a road parcel and 2 small reserves to Council, considering that these only services one private property.

 

It is considered that the Road is no longer reasonably required for general public use as it is not required for public access, is not open, and is not available for public use.

 

The owner of 193 Dorset Road Croydon has indicated that he is interested in purchasing the Road and the Land, if the Road is discontinued.

 

As part of the Planning Permit No. M/2018/470, a Section 173 Agreement is included, stipulating that the owner will consolidate the Road and Land with the Common Property No. 1 on the plan of subdivision PS 823064J.

 

Council is required to make an application pursuant to section 24A of the Subdivision Act 1988 to remove the ‘reserve’ status from the Land.

 

Council’s contract Valuers, Westlink Consulting, provided a current market valuation for the road and reserve parcels, totalling an area of 104.1 sqm, at $100 per sqm - $10,400 + GST.

Financial / economic issues

The legal and disbursement costs associated with the discontinuance and sale of the road and reserve, would be funded by the purchaser in line with Council’s Policy, estimated at $10,000.  The costs associated with Councils administration in dealing with property matters is contained within the current budget.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not applicable

Social / community issues

Not applicable


 

Community consultation

Before proceeding with the discontinuance of the Road and sale of the Land, Council must give public notice of the proposed discontinuance and sale in accordance with Section 223 of the Act. The Act provides that a person may, within 28 days of the date of the public notice, lodge a written submission regarding the proposed discontinuance and sale of the land.

 

Where a person has made a written submission to Council requesting that he or she be heard in support of the written submission, Council must permit that person to be heard before a meeting of Council or the Committee which has delegated authority to hear those submissions, giving reasonable notice of the day, time, and place of meeting.

 

After hearing any submissions made, Council must determine whether the Road is not reasonably required as a road for public use, in order to decide whether the Road should be discontinued.

Conclusion

It is proposed that Council should commence the statutory procedures pursuant to clause 3 of Schedule 10 of the Act, to consider discontinuing the Road and selling the Road and the Land to the owner of 193 and 193A Dorset Road Croydon, subject to satisfactory completion of those procedures.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Title Plan - PS 314897 - 193 Dorset Road Croydon

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That council acting under section 189 and clause 3 of schedule 10 of the local government act 1989 (the act):

1.       resolves that the statutory procedures be commenced to:

i.        discontinue the road known as r1 on plan of subdivision 314897w certificate of title volume 10171 folio 287

ii.       consider the sale of reserve 1 plan of subdivision 314897w certificate of title volume 10171 folio 286

2.       directs that under sections 207a and 223 of the act and with council’s public exhibition policy, public notice of the proposed discontinuance of the road and the proposed sale of the reserve be given in ‘the age’ newspaper

3.       resolves that the public notice required to be given under sections 207a and 223 of the act should state that:

i.        if the road is discontinued council proposes to sell the road to the adjoining property owner at 193 dorset road croydon for market value 

ii.       council proposes to prepare a plan pursuant to section 24A Subdivision act 1988 to remove the reserve status from the land and proposes to sell the land to the adjoining property owner at 193 Dorset Road croydon for market value

4.       a committee comprising councillors steane (mayor) damante and graham be appointed to hear any person wishing to be heard in support of their submission, on a date to be determined and

5.       authorises director corporate services to undertake the administrative procedures necessary to enable council to carry out its functions under section 223 of the act in relation to this matter

 

 


Director Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Sale Of Discontinued Right Of Way - 4A Kitchener Road Croydon

Item 5

 

Purpose

To authorise commencement of the legislative procedures pursuant to the Local Government Act 1989 (Act) to consider the sale of the discontinued right of way (DROW) known as 4A Kitchener Road Croydon, as contained in Certificate of Title, Volume 11159 Folio 189 - Lot 1 PS 624858D (Land) to the owners of 5 Joffre Street and 3/6 Kitchener Road Croydon.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community.

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered. Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes, and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive, and         accountable.

8.2     Ensure responsible and sustainable management of Maroondah resources, assets,       infrastructure, and natural environment.

Background

Council at its meeting on 19 March 2007, resolved to discontinue the right of way (ROW) between 7 and 9 Joffre Street and at the rear 4 to 8 Kitchener Road Croydon. A notice of the ROW’s discontinuance was published in the Government Gazette on 6 December 2007.

 

The land was subdivided into 3 lots and in February 2010 Council sold Lot 2 PS 624858D to the owners of 8 Kitchener Road.

 

Lot 1 PS624858D is vacant land maintained by Council and has not been enclosed by any of the abutting property owners. Access will continue through a creation of an easement in favour of Council to accommodate the 225mm stormwater drainage pipe that exists and in favour of Yarra Valley Water.

 

In July 2014, the owner of 5 Joffre Street enquired about purchasing part of Lot 1 PS 624858D. To avoid the remainder of Lot 1 being land locked, Council offered the entire Lot for purchase to this owner, on the assumption that the property at 3/6 Kitchener was tenanted and that that owner would not be interested in the land.

 

A valuation was sought from Council’s Valuers in October 2014 for the entire parcel of Lot 1 PS 624858D and the land was valued at $28,000.

 

Later that month, a request to purchase part of Lot 1 PS 624858D was received from 3/6 Kitchener Road. Both owners indicated that they were going to discuss the apportionment of land with each other. In December 2014, 3/6 Kitchener advised that agreement had not yet been reached between the owners.

 

In December 2015, the owner of 3/6 Kitchener Road requested that Council re-open negotiations to purchase Lot 1 of the DROW.

 

On 7 January 2016, Council wrote to both owners notifying them that once they had decided on the apportionment of Lot 1 PS 624858D, Council would proceed with the matter to sell the land. The owners were given until 27 January 2016 to respond and were advised that should only one response be received, then Council would proceed to sell the land to that owner.

 

No responses were received and once again the matter had resulted in a stale mate situation.

 

In June 2017, the owner of 3/6 Kitchener Road wrote to Council seeking an update on the matter and was advised that since Council had not received any responses from the correspondence sent in January 2016, the matter was closed. The owner of 3/6 Kitchener advised that he still expressed an interest in purchasing the land.

 

An estimate value of $250 per sqm for the land was provided to 3/6 Kitchener Road, however this was subject to a formal valuation being sought prior the commencement of the statutory procedures. He was advised that Council would write to all abutting property owners, including 5 and 7 Joffre Street and 3/4 Kitchener Road, seeking their interest, however Council would not commence this process until early 2018.

 

In July 2018, Council finalised the sale of Lot 3 PS 624858D to the owner of 7 Joffre Street after completing the statutory requirements on the sale of Council land. Refer to attachment.

Issue / discussion

In April 2018 Council wrote to the 4 adjoining property owners to Lot 1 PS 624858D, seeking their expression of interest. This process sought an indication of who is interested in purchasing the land and an estimated value of the land of $350 per sqm was provided to the owners, with a formal valuation still to be obtained from Councils Valuers.

 

Internal consultation with Council’s relevant service areas resulted in support of the proposal to sell Lot 1 of the DROW.

 

The property owners at 3/4 Kitchener Road and 7 Joffre Street did not respond and the owners of 5 Joffre Street and 3/6 Kitchener Road expressed interest again for the land at the rear of their respective properties.

 

Further letters were sent to both interested parties, requesting them to provide a once only bid over the market value of $350 per sqm, for the 16 sqm of land overlapping between both rear properties.


 

 

The bids received for the 16 sqm of land were as follows;

·        5 Joffre Street offered $510 per sqm

·        3/6 Kitchener Road offered $735 per sqm

Due to the 6-month time lapse of obtaining the valuation, Councils contract Valuers provided a revised valuation, which reflected the decrease in land values. The land is currently valued at $300 per sqm. 

 

Council sought legal advice regarding the bidding aspect of the 16 sqm being contested by the two abutting owners. The advice determined that the respective bids from both owners would not be affected by the valuation reduction in the most recent valuation conducted.

 

Both owners were advised of the outcome and were provided their respective amounts to be paid, to receive the available Council land.

 

The current status, including land dimensions and associated costs to each owner is as follows;

·        5 Joffre Street to purchase 73 sqm of land at $300 per sqm - total of $22,050 + GST

·        3/6 Kitchener Road to purchase 57.5 sqm of land at $300 per sqm and 16 sqm at $735 per sqm - total $29,010 + GST

The total monies for the proposed sale of the Land will be $51,060 + GST.

Financial / economic issues

The legal and disbursement costs associated with the sale of the DROW land, would be funded by the purchasers in line with Council policy, estimated at $10,000 per property owner. The costs associated with Council’s administration in dealing with property matters are contained within the current budget.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not applicable

Social / community issues

Not applicable

Community consultation

Before proceeding with the sale of the land, Council must give public notice of the proposed sale in accordance with Section 223 of the Act. The Act provides that a person may, within 28 days of the date of the public notice, lodge a written submission regarding the proposed sale of land.


 

 

Where a person has made a written submission to Council requesting that he or she be heard in support of the written submission, Council must permit that person to be heard before a meeting of Council or the Committee which has delegated authority to hear those submissions, giving reasonable notice of the day, time, and place of meeting.

 

After hearing any submissions made, Council must determine whether or not to proceed with the sale.

Conclusion

It is proposed that Council should commence the statutory procedures pursuant to Section 189 and 223 of the Act, to consider selling the Land to the property owners at 5 Joffre Street and 3/6 Kitchener Road, as outlined above in this report, subject to the satisfactory completion of those procedures.

 

 

Attachments

1.

DROW 4A Kitchener Road - Diagram of land to be sold

2.

Plan of subdivision PS 624858D

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That council acting under section 189 of the local government act 1989 (the act) resolves that;

1.       the statutory procedures be commenced to the sale of the discontinued right of way at 4a kitchener road croydon, as contained in certificate of title volume 11159 folio 189, and as depicted in attachments 1 and 2 of this report

2.       public notice be given in accordance with sections 189, 207a and 223 of the act and with council’s public exhibition policy; such notice to state that council proposes to sell the land to the owners of 5 joffre street and 3/6 kitchener road croydon for no less than the market valuation held by council

3.       in accordance with section 223 of the act:

i.        a committee comprising ward councillors steane (mayor), graham and damante be appointed to hear any persons wishing to be heard in support of their submission, on a date to be determined

 

ii.       considers all written submissions, including a written report on the proceedings of any committee hearing conducted, following which it shall determine whether or not to sell the land as proposed

iii.      the director corporate services be authorised to undertake the administrative procedures necessary to enable council to carry out its functions under section 223 of the act in relation to this matter

4.       should no submissions be received, council further resolves that:

i.        having followed all the required statutory procedures pursuant to section 189, 207a and 223 of the act, land comprising of lot 1 plan of subdivision 624858d be sold to the owners of 5 joffre street and 3/6 kitchener road croydon for no less than the market valuation held by council

ii.       Council and yarra valley water be granted an easement over their assets and future assets as a condition of sale of lot 1 plan of subdivision 624858d

5.       the chief executive officer, or any other person with the necessary delegation, sign any transfer of land and other documents required to be signed in connection with the sale of the land to the owners of 5 joffre street and 3/6 kitchener road croydon

 


 

Director Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

Municipal Association of Victoria State Council Meeting - Motions

Item 6

 

Purpose

To consider motions for submission to the Municipal Association of Victoria State Council Meeting to be held on Friday 17 May 2019.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1       Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

The Municipal Association of Victoria’s State Council Meeting will be held on Friday 17 May 2019.  The proposed Maroondah motion is viewed as being of significance across the Victorian Local Government sector and therefore of importance for debate and consideration by the State Council Meeting. 

 

The Municipal Association of Victoria together with local members of parliament provides significant advocacy to the State Government on behalf of Maroondah residents and ratepayers. 

Issue / discussion

Proposed motion and rationale:

 

Planning Infringement Costs - Seeking Changes to the Penalties Associated with Illegal Tree Removal

 

Motion: That the Municipal Association of Victoria State Council calls upon the State Government to pursue increased penalties associated with Planning Infringement Notices (PIN) issued to expiate the offence of tree removal

 

Rationale: The removal of vegetation without the relevant planning approval from Council is increasingly becoming an issue for both the Council and the community. The loss of canopy cover and significant vegetation not only impacts on the natural environment but facilitates an outcome whereby a landowner may gain a development advantage as a result of vegetation removed from the site.

 

Due to increased land values, population growth and development aspirations sought by landowners seeking to redevelop their site, there has been a growing trend both in Maroondah and other municipalities for vegetation to be removed or destroyed without planning permits being sought from Council. Since 2015, Planning Infringement Notices issued by Maroondah for illegal tree removal has increased, with the removal being primarily for the purpose of facilitating future redevelopment opportunities.

 

The relatively low infringement amounts based on the penalty units in the Planning and Environment Act 1987 for an individual or company, can easily be absorbed into the cost of doing business and are not a sufficient deterrent. This then leaves Council with the burden (including financially) of managing the impacts to its environment and future development outcomes, as well as the expectations of the community.  

 

This proposed motion has considered the financial and environmental impacts, as well as the increasing trend of such offences continuing particularly given the current economic climate. The imposition of greater penalties, which may include delays on future developments commencing or substantial replanting requirements could aid in minimising future offences occurring.

Financial / economic issues

Refer to rationale as highlighted under Issue / Discussion.

Environmental / amenity issues

Refer to rationale as highlighted under Issue / Discussion.

Social / community issues

Refer to rationale as highlighted under Issue / Discussion.

Community consultation

Council, through various forums, consultations and strategies, has engaged the Maroondah community regarding these various issues. This report further demonstrates Council’s preparedness to advocate to the State Government on behalf of Maroondah residents.

Conclusion

The proposed motion has a State-wide significance throughout the Local Government sector and therefore should be discussed at the State Council Meeting

 

The closing date for the receipt of motions is Tuesday 23 April 2019.  It is therefore proposed that Council endorse the actions of Officers in submitting the proposed motion.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable


 

 

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT COUNCIL ENDORSES THE ACTIONS OF OFFICERS IN SUBMITTING THE FOLLOWING MOTION ON BEHALF OF MAROONDAH CITY COUNCIL FOR CONSIDERATION AND DEBATE AT THE MUNICIPAL ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA STATE COUNCIL MEETING TO BE HELD ON FRIDAY 17 MAY 2019:

§  Planning Infringement costs - Seeking changes to the penalties associated with illegal tree removal

 

That the Municipal Association of Victoria State Council calls upon the State Government to pursue increased penalties associated with Planning Infringement Notices (PIN) issued to expiate the offence of tree removal

 

 

 


Director Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Council Policy - Councillor Expenses, Support and Reimbursement Policy

Item 7

 

Purpose

To update the Councillor Expenses, Support and Reimbursement Policy to ensure it meets the current legislative framework; acknowledges the current review of the Local Government Act 1989; and provides clear guidelines, accountability and transparency.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered. Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs.

Key Directions:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and          accountable

8.2     Ensure responsible and sustainable management of Maroondah’s resources, assets,     infrastructure and natural environment

Background

Council initially adopted a policy on expenses and entitlements on 18 August 1997 and has subsequently revised such policy on 17 April 2000, 18 September 2006, 27 June, 2011 and March 27, 2017.

The legislative framework for such a policy is provided by:

·        Local Government Act 1989 - Sections 74 and 75 (Version incorporating amendments as at 1 September 2016)

·        Recognition and Support, the Victorian Government’s Policy Statement on Local Government Mayoral and Councillor Allowances and Resources, April 2008

·        Victorian Government’s Information Guide on Mayor and Councillor Entitlements –Reimbursement of Expenses and Provision of Resources and Facilities Support for Victorian Mayors and Councillors November 2008.

It is viewed as appropriate that the policy is reviewed every two years. 

 

 

 

Issue / discussion

The Councillor Expenses and Entitlements Policy was last updated in 2017.

It is timely that it be reviewed and updated to capture:

·        the legislative changes that have occurred in this timeframe

·        the increased scrutiny of expenses and entitlements of other levels of government to ensure clarity and transparency

·        community expectations regarding Council’s spending to ensure that the policy fits “the pub test”.

The Policy applies to the Mayor and Councillors and identifies the provision of resources and facilities, and the reimbursement of expenses incurred, while undertaking the prescribed Duties of Council, as well as clarifying the approval process.

The minor amendments cover:

Page 3 - Vehicle for Mayor or annualised cash allowance - revised to reflect the current budget allocation

Page 4 - Amend reference to the Council Plan 2017-2021

Page 6 - Professional Development - revised to include membership of relevant professional associations

Page 7 - 2.5.4 Travel now includes Uber and hire vehicles

This Policy continues to meet the current legislative framework, acknowledges the 2015-2018 review of the Local Government Act 1989, and will be subject to future review to take account of the anticipated changes to the Local Government Act 1989.

Financial / economic issues

Not applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community consultation

A report is provided to Council on a quarterly basis summarising:

·        Travel;

·        Car Mileage;

·        Child Care;

·        Information and Communication expenses

·        Professional Development (including conferences and training);

·        Civic and Community Attendance.

This report is available on Council’s website and included in the Annual Report to meet the Local Government Amendment (Performance Reporting and Accountability) Act 2014, which is now consolidated in the Local Government Act 1989 as amended.

Conclusion

That Council adopts the proposed Councillor Expenses, Support and Reimbursement Policy – April 2019, as part of good governance practice, as it provides consistency, transparency and accountability on the matters covered, in line with current legislative frameworks, and Victorian Government expectations.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Draft Councillor expenses support and reimbursement policy April 2019 - Council Agenda 190429

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL ADOPTS THE COUNCILLOR EXPENSES, SUPPORT AND REIMBURSEMENT POLICY DATED APRIL 2019, AS ATTACHED TO THIS REPORT

 


Director Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Councillors Quarterly Expense and Reimbursement Report - January to March 2019

Item 8

 

Purpose

To provide a report to the community on Councillor expenses.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community.

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an empowered community that is actively engaged in council decision making through processes that consider the needs and aspirations of all ages and population groups.  Council will provide strong and responsive leadership, ensuring transparency, while working with the community to advocate for and ‘champion’ local needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable.

Background

The Councillor Expenses, Support and Reimbursement Policy was adopted by Council on 27 March 2017.

In accordance with Section 75 of the Local Government Act 1989, Council is required to reimburse a Councillor for expenses incurred whilst performing his or her duties as a Councillor. Council is also required to adopt and maintain a Policy in relation to the reimbursement of expenses for Councillors. The Policy provides guidance for the payment of reimbursements of expenses and the provision of resources, facilities and other support to the Mayor and Councillors to enable them to discharge their duties.

 

Council also publishes in its Annual Report the details of the expenses, including reimbursement of expenses for each Councillor and member of a Council Committee paid by the Council. The details of the expenses for the past financial year are set out in the 2017/18 Annual Report.

Issue / discussion

This is a standard Governance reporting item.


 

 

Financial / economic issues

A budget of $102,000 in the 2018/2019 financial year exists for the expenses and reimbursement of Councillors. A budget of $12,000 is allocated to the Office of the Mayor for the provision of a vehicle for the November 2018 – November 2019 Mayoral term.

Councillor

TR

($)

CM

($)

CC

($)

IC

($)

CT

($)

CCA

($)

Total

Jan to Mar

($)

Year to date

($)

 

Tony Dib JP

 

0

0

0

84.76

0

90.00

174.76

487.57

 

Paul Macdonald

 

0

0

0

115.79

0

1,527.75

1,643.50

5,634.35

 

Kylie Spears

Deputy Mayor

 

358.08

0

0

72.50

1,844.54

1,337.39

3,612.50

6,222.20

 

Nora Lamont

 

762.07

0

0

*-133.99

818.18

182.00

1,628.31

7,876.98

 

Samantha Mazzuchelli

 

0

0

0

112.49

0

0

112.49

454.39

 

Mike Symon

 

950.43

355.68

0

170.84

3,566.07

97.93

5,141.00

11,018.63

 

Marijke Graham

 

18.36

0

0

71.99

530.00

1,225.82

1,846.20

3,885.12

 

Tasa Damante

 

0

0

199.00

72.00

0

1,109.00

1,380.00

3,638.18

 

Rob Steane

Mayor

 

388.10

3,000.00#

0

93.94

1,309.17

886.91

5,678.10

10,790.45

TOTAL

 

$2,477.04

$3,355.68

$199.00

$660.32

$8,067.96

$6,456.80

$21,216.86

$50,007.87

 

Legend: TR-Travel, CM-Car Mileage (# a budget allocation of $12,000 is allocated to the Office of the Mayor for the provision of a vehicle for the Nov 18 – Nov 19 Mayoral term), CC-Child Care, IC-Information and Communication expenses, CT- Conferences and Training expenses, CCA-Civic and Community Attendance

*Credit due to organisational transition to MAV’s TPAMS communication contract with associated changes to billing dates during this period.

 

Note: No expenses were paid by Council including reimbursements to members of Council Committees during the year.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable


 

 

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

Not Applicable

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL NOTES THE COUNCILLORS EXPENSE AND REIMBURSEMENT REPORT FOR JANUARY TO MARCH 2019

  


Director Operations, Assets & Leisure Adam Todorov

 

Capital Works Report 2018/2019 - Period Ending 31 March 2019

Item 1

 

Purpose

To present the financial status of Council’s Capital Works Program for the period 1 July 2018 to 31 March 2019.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable.

Background

As part of Council’s Adopted Budget for 2018/2019 $43.68m has been allocated to Capital Works projects.  This includes $13.1m of State and Federal grant monies.  Council expects to receive an additional $6.18m in grant funding and has carried forward $7.41m from the 2017/2018 capital works budget.  The total forecast budget for 2018/2019 is therefore $57.28m.  

 

Capital Works program status reports are prepared by management, reviewed monthly at the Capital Works Implementation Group (CWIG) and presented quarterly to the Audit and Risk Advisory Committee (ARAC).

 

This report provides an overview of the status of Council’s Capital Works Budget for the period 1 July 2018 to 31 March 2019.

 


Issue / discussion

The following is a summary of the status of Council’s capital projects financial position for the third quarter of the 2018/2019 financial year.

 

CAPITAL PERFORMANCE – 9 MONTHS ENDING 31 MARCH 2019

 

YTD

YTD

YTD

Forecast

Amount

Adopted

Forecast Budget

Actual *

Bud Var

Budget **

Carried Forward

Budget

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

Classification

Buildings1

13,861

13,891

(30)

26,776

3,494

17,741

Roads2

5,212

5,216

(4)

7,555

1,153

4,325

Footpaths and Cycleways3

2,773

2,995

(223)

3,311

17

3,090

Carparks4

244

253

(9)

494

104

460

Drainage5

1,480

1,514

(34)

3,691

94

3,467

Waste Management

21

21

(0)

81

31

50

Other Capital Roads and Drainage6

87

89

(3)

926

481

720

Recreational Leisure and Community Facilities7

2,550

2,586

(36)

4,243

525

3,206

Parks and Open Space8

1,512

1,502

10

2,693

1,465

1,260

Fixtures, Fittings and Furniture

43

35

8

134

5

80

Plant, Machinery and Equipment9

1,853

1,631

223

3,127

(37)

3,882

Computers and Telecommunications10

315

296

19

1,743

838

930

Property Sales 11

631

672

(41)

631

0

0

Building Renewal12

1,858

2,080

(222)

1,873

(754)

4,470

Total capital works

32,441

32,781

(341)

57,279

7,416

43,681

*YTD Actual expenditure includes Carried Forwards   

**Forecast Budget expenditure includes Carried Forwards and future years’ projects brought forward

 

Explanation of variations between forecast budget and adopted budget:

·        1 Buildings – Variation between adopted $17.7m and forecast $26.7m budgets is due primarily to:

-        $3.5m in carried forwards from 17/18;

-        $2.0m grant for the Jubilee Park Sporting Pavilion Redevelopment;

-        $513k grant for the Springfield Sports Pavilion Redevelopment;

-        $350k from the Plant & Fleet program that was reallocated to the Operations Centre Redevelopment project;

-        $225k of the $250k grant for Silcock Sporting Pavilion Redevelopment;

-        $200k grant for the Eastfield Park Sporting Pavilion Changerooms; and

-        $100k grant for the Quambee Sporting Pavilion Changerooms.

·        2 Roads – Variation between adopted $4.3m and forecast $7.5m budgets is due primarily to:

-        $1.2m in carried forwards from 17/18;

-        $1.045m grant for the Heathmont Shopping Centre Access Improvements;

-        $728k grant for the Main Street Pedestrian Safety Improvements; and

-        $100k grant from VicRoads for Local Area Traffic Management Safe Travel in Local Roads.

·        3 Footpaths & Cycleways – Variation between adopted $3.0m and forecast $3.3m budgets is due partially to:

-        $17k in carried forwards from 17/18.

·        4 Carparks – Variation between adopted $460k and forecast $494k budget is due primarily to:

-        $104k in carried forwards from 17/18; and

·        5 Drainage – Variation between adopted $3.4m and forecast $3.7m budgets is due primarily to:

-        $420k contribution for Jumping Creek Corridor; and

-        $94k in carried forwards from 17/18.

·        6 Other Capital Roads and Drainage – Variation between adopted $720k and forecast $926k is due primarily to:

-        $841k in carried forwards from 17/18.

·        7 Recreational Leisure and Community Facilities – Variation between adopted $3.2m and forecast $4.2m budgets due primarily to:

-        $525k in carried forwards from 17/18;

-        $158k grant for Cheong Park Sportsfield Lighting;

-        $130k grant for Cheong Park Female Change Rooms;

-        $100k grant for the HE Parker Oval no 1 Sportsfield Lighting; and

-        $16k grant from Department Premier & Cabinet for Community War Memorial

·        8 Parks and Open Space – Variation between adopted $1.2m and forecast $2.7m budgets is due primarily to:

-        $1.26m in carried forwards from 17/18


 

 

·        9 Plant Machinery and Equipment – Variation between adopted $3.8m and forecast $3.1m budgets is due primarily to:

-        $590k reallocated to the Building Program; and

-        $93k reallocated to the Recreational Leisure & Community Facilities Program

·        10 Computers and Telecommunication – Variation between adopted $930k and forecast $1.74m budgets is primarily due to:

-        $838k in carried forwards from 17/18.

·        11 Property Sales – Variation between adopted $0k and forecast $631k budgets is due to:

-        $631k bought forward from the Drainage Program in 19/20 & 20/21 for property purchase to assist with flood mitigation

·        12 Building Renewal – Variation between adopted $4.47m and forecast $1.8m budgets is due to:

-        $2.45m being allocated to specific community facility projects (such as Bill Wilkins Lodge Redevelopment) within the ‘building’ category of the report; and

-        $754k in negative carried forwards, associated with building works that were undertaken in 17/18 and being funded through the 18/19 budget

Financial / economic issues

CARRIED FORWARDS

Council has carried forward an amount of $7.78m into the 2018/2019 financial year. 

 

PROJECT STATUS

Attachment 1 shows the status of the overall capital works expenditure to 31 March 2019. 

 


CAPITAL WORKS YTD – EXPENDITURE (CUMULATIVE)

* YTD Actual expenditure includes Carried Forwards

** Forecast Budget expenditure includes Carried Forwards

 

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

Council has a total Capital Works forecast budget for 2018/2019 of $57.28m, which is comprised of $43.68m (including $13.1m of State and Federal grants), $7.41m carried forward from 2017/2018 and an additional $6.18m anticipated in grant funding.  Key variations between adopted and forecast budgets are noted for the period 1 July 2018 to 31 March 2019 within this report.


 

 

 

Attachments

1.

Capital Works Expenditure to 31 March 2019

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE REPORT ON THE STATUS OF CAPITAL WORKS PROJECTS FOR THE PERIOD 1 JULY 2018 TO 31 MARCH 2019

 

  


 

ACTING Director Strategy & Community grant meyer

Maroondah Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2018-2020

Item 1

 

Purpose

To present the Maroondah Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2018-2020 for formal consideration following a period of public exhibition.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area: An inclusive and diverse community

 

Our Vision: In 2040, Maroondah will be an active inclusive community where social connections are strong across generations and diversity is embraced and celebrated.

 

Key Directions 2018-2019:

 

7.15 Acknowledge, recognise and value our indigenous heritage and communities

 

Priority Action 2018-2019:

 

Not applicable

Background

Reconciliation is unity and respect between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous Australians. It is about respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heritage and valuing justice and equity for all Australians.

 

Late in 2014, Council undertook a research project to identify the most beneficial model to review, document and progress Council’s commitment to reconciliation. In 2015, Council endorsed the recommendation to proceed with Reconciliation Australia’s Reconciliation Action Plan Program.

 

The Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) program, developed by Reconciliation Australia is a framework for organisations to realise their vision for reconciliation. The RAP program guides organisations in developing a strategic action plan that identifies practical actions and measures for building respectful relationships and creating opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The Maroondah RAP has been developed in accordance with the ‘Innovate RAP’ framework.

Issue / discussion

In the initial planning stages of developing the Maroondah Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2018-2020. Council formed the Maroondah Reconciliation Action Plan Working Group (MRAP) comprising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous individuals from both within and external to Council. The MRAP Working Group has supported and guided the development of the MRAP bringing knowledge, skills and experience that have contributed to the draft Plan.

 

Membership of the group includes representatives from the Wurundjeri Tribal Land Compensation and Cultural Heritage Council, Mullum Mullum Indigenous Gathering Place, Boorndawan Willam Aboriginal Healing Service, EACH and Maroondah Movement for Reconciliation.

Financial / economic issues

Not applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not applicable

Social / community issues

As identified in the 2016 Census, there are 566 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples recorded in Maroondah. This is a notable increase from 411 in 2011. The majority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait peoples in Maroondah are Aboriginal (94.2%). This is in line with results across Victoria (93.3%)

Community consultation

In developing the RAP, Council, along with members of the MRAP Working Group, has undertaken meaningful engagement and consultation with the whole of community and key stakeholders on the identification of actions that Council can undertake towards reconciliation in Maroondah. The consultation program included Café Consult at Maroondah Festival, Activity based sessions at Mullum Mullum Indigenous Gathering Place and a stakeholder workshop at Karralyka.

 

At the Council Meeting on 17 December 2018, Council provisionally endorsed the Draft Maroondah Reconciliation Action Plan 2018-2020 and authorised its placement on public exhibition for a four week period from 23 January to 20 February 2019.

 

The public exhibition process involved:

·        Public exhibition of the Draft Maroondah Reconciliation Action Plan 2018-2020 on Council’s website, Council Service Centres and local libraries.

·        A newspaper advertisement seeking comments or feedback from the community on the Draft Maroondah Reconciliation Action Plan 2018-2020  

Written and online comments were received until 20 February 2019. One formal submission was received that stressed the importance of engagement with the indigenous community (Attachment 2).  No subsequent changes were incorporated into the Action Plan.

 

Since the conclusion of this exhibition period, Council has worked closely with Reconciliation Australia to finalise the Plan.


 

Conclusion

Council has developed the Maroondah Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2018-2020 involving background research and community consultation. The Plan outlines Council’s commitment to promoting and working towards greater reconciliation in Maroondah.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Maroondah Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan 2018-2020 - April 2019

2.

Council response to formal submissions- Draft Reconciliation Action Plan 2018-2020

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATIONS

 

That COUNCIL

1.       ADOPTS THE MAROONDAH INNOVATE RECONCILIATION ACTION PLAN 2018-2020

2.       ACKNOWLEDGES THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE MAROONDAH RECONCILIATION ACTION PLAN WORKING GROUP AND COMMUNITY STAKEHOLDERS WHO ASSISTED IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE MAROONDAH INNOVATE RECONCILIATION ACTION PLAN 2018-2020

 

 

 


 

acting Director Strategy & Community grant meyer

DRAFT DISABILITY POLICY AND ACTION PLAN 2019-2021

Item 2

 

Purpose

To present the Maroondah Disability Policy and Action Plan 2019-2021 for formal consideration following a period of public exhibition.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area: An inclusive and diverse community

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an inclusive community where social connections are strong across all generations and diversity is embraced and celebrated.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

7.1     Ensure accessibility and social inclusion principles are considered in the planning,         delivery and evaluation of facilities and services

7.2     Encourage programs and initiatives that raise the awareness of accessibility issues and          deliver improved access to facilities and services for all ages and abilities

5.1     Ensure public buildings are accessible to people of all ages and abilities, and promote   high levels of accessibility in commercial premises

5.2     Work in partnership to provide improved accessibility and safety for transport users        across all modes

5.3     Ensure all events and festivals are accessible for people of all ages and abilities

2.6     Work in partnerships to promote local employment opportunities for marginalised and    disadvantaged population groups

2.12   Broker community to government to business partnerships that build social capital,        create community connections and foster a culture of corporate social responsibility

1.11   Work in partnership to address and promote awareness of mental health issues within   the community

Priority Action 2018-2019:

Develop and commence implementation of a new Disability Policy and Action Plan

Background

The Maroondah Disability Policy and Action Plan 2019-2021 outlines Council’s commitment and strategic direction in supporting a more accessible and socially inclusive community over the next three years.

 

 

In recent years, Maroondah City Council has become an innovative leader in the disability sector. Examples include the introduction of Changing Places facilities, the Pathways for Carers program and the Access Focus Group. Council has been the recipient of many awards for its innovative work at both a state and national level.

 

The commitments and initiatives in this policy and action plan will build on these recent achievements and work towards a community where all people have the opportunity to have high levels of social, emotional and physical wellbeing.

 

Issue / discussion

The Maroondah Disability Policy and Action Plan 2019-2021 incorporates a range of initiatives across the breadth of Council operations to remove barriers to discrimination and meet the legislative obligations for people with disabilities, their families and carers.

 

The Plan is a statutory requirement that is prepared in terms of the requirements set out in the Disability Act 2006. Council is required to report annually in its Annual Report on the progress of the Plan.

 

The Plan will extend until 30 June 2021 to align the lifecycle with development of the next Maroondah Health and Wellbeing Plan 2021-2025. The new Plan will replace the Disability Policy and Action Plan 2014-2018.

 

The Plan has been developed through examining data, considering relevant government legislation and engaging with the community to determine the issues that are important to them.

 

Council acknowledges the valuable input from the Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee and a broad range of community stakeholders in developing the Plan.

Financial / economic issues

Not applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not applicable

Social / community issues

At the time of the 2016 Census of Population and Housing, the City of Maroondah had a total of 5,482 (5.0% of total population) residents living with a profound or severe disability, who require assistance with daily activities. There are more females living with a profound or severe disability in Maroondah then there are males.

 

In Maroondah, 47.6% of the population over 85 are identified as in need of assistance with daily activities or living with disabilities.

 

Maroondah has almost double the number of people providing unpaid care as they have people in need of assistance.

The percentage of the population in need of assistance who are unemployed and looking for work is greater in Maroondah than both the Eastern Metropolitan Region (EMR) and Greater Melbourne.

 

Between 2016 and 2031, the population of Maroondah residents living with disabilities is expected to increase by 35%. Of this increase, the age groups between 70-74 and 85+ years are expected to have the most significant increases.

Community consultation

In developing the Maroondah Disability Policy and Action Plan 2019-2021, Council undertook direct engagement with community members and stakeholders to identify the challenges faced by people with disabilities in Maroondah.

 

Over a 12-month engagement period, Council sought input from members of the community, people with disabilities, carers of people with disabilities, representatives of local disability organisations, and internal stakeholders. The focus of this engagement was to help identify the issues faced by people living with disabilities in Maroondah and to determine what can be done to deal with those issues.

 

At its meeting on 18 March 2019, Council provisionally endorsed the Draft Maroondah Disability Policy and Action Plan 2019-2021 and authorised its placement on public exhibition for a period of four weeks from 19 March 2019 to 17 April 2019.

 

The process involved:

·        Public exhibition of the Draft Disability Policy and Action Plan 2019-2021 on Council’s website, Council Service Centres and local libraries.

·        A newspaper advertisement seeking comments or feedback from the community on the Draft Disability Policy and Action Plan 2019-2021.

 

Written and online comments were received until 17 April 2019. A total of 3 formal submissions were received.

Conclusion

Council has developed the Maroondah Disability Policy and Action Plan 2019-2021 after an extensive process of background research and community consultation. The Plan outlines Council’s commitment to continuing to promote and work towards inclusion in Maroondah.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Draft Maroondah Disability Policy and Action Plan 2019/21 - April 2019

2.

Council response to formal submissions- Draft Disability Policy and Action Plan 2019-2021

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That council

1.       ADOPTS THE MAROONDAH DISABILITY POLICY AND ACTION PLAN 2019-2021

2.       ACKNOWLEDGES THE significant CONTRiBuTION OF THE MAROONDAH DISABILITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE AND COMMUNITY STAKEHOLDERS WHO ASSISTED IN DEVELOPMENT OF THE MAROONDAH DISABILITY POLICY AND ACTION PLAN 2019-2021

 

 


 

acting Director Strategy & Community grant meyer

Maroondah Neighbourhood Character Study Review 2018-19: Implementation Recommendations

Item 3

 

Purpose

To advise Council of the findings and recommendations of the Draft Neighbourhood Character Study Review Implementation Report (Attachment 1) and recommend that Council release this report for community consultation.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  An attractive, thriving and well-built community

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an attractive community with high quality residential and commercial areas incorporating infrastructure that meets the needs and aspirations of all ages and abilities.  A diverse range of housing options are available and thriving activity centres provide a broad range of facilities and services that meet community needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

6.10 Develop and implement an urban form that enhances the desirable attributes of     Maroondah to protect and value ridgelines, vegetation, neighbourhood character, local          history and cultural heritage

Priority Actions 2018/19

Undertake a municipal wide review of Council’s neighbourhood character and heritage controls.

Background

The Maroondah Neighbourhood Character Study Review 2018/19 provides an assessment of the character attributes of residential areas across Maroondah; recommend ways to ensure that the existing character is respected; and support new development so as to ensure that a preferred character is achieved.

 

Council engaged Claire Scott Planning to undertake the Review which is being undertaken in five-stages:

 

Stage 1: Appointment of a Consultant

Stage 2: Residential Character Assessment

Stage 3: Identification of Community Values

Stage 4: Implementation Recommendations

Stage 5: Final Report

 

Stage 3 of the project has been completed and involved the following community engagement:


 

 

Meeting with Key Stakeholders

 

A workshop discussion took place on 23 October 2018 with representatives from key community groups.

 

The purpose of the session was two-fold.  Firstly, to provide a background to the Neighbourhood Character Study Review and obtain feedback on community views about valued elements of their neighbourhood.   Secondly, stakeholders were also consulted to promote six community drop in sessions amongst their members. 

 

The stakeholder workshop was attended by members of:

·        Ruskin Park Residents Action Group

·        Croydon Golf Links Estate Residents Association

·        Jubilee Park Residents Group

·        The Monastery Ridge Group

·        The Ringwood East Action Group

·        Croydon Conservation Society

 

Café Consult

 

A consultation session on the Neighbourhood Character Study Review took place as part of Café Consult at the Maroondah Festival on 11 November 2018.

 

Café Consult allowed the general community to speak to Council staff about the forthcoming review and provide feedback on the important elements of neighbourhood character in Maroondah.

 

Participants were provided with a postcard that displayed eight key elements of Maroondah’s neighbourhood character and were then asked to respond to three questions:

 

1.   What top elements do you value most?

2.   Which three elements would you like to see in your future neighbourhood?

3.   What is your street name and suburb?

 

A total of 65 people participated in the Café Consult Neighbourhood Character Study Review engagement activity. Of these participants, 47 identified ‘footpaths and bike paths’ as one of the top three most valued character elements of the neighbourhood. Other key elements that received a high number of votes included: ‘street trees’ (45); ‘private garden areas’ and ‘space around buildings’ (39); and ‘high tree canopy’ (28).


 

 

In future participants would like to see more of the following priorities:

·        Footpath and bike paths (38 votes)

·        Street tree (37 votes)

·        Diversity of housing style (24 votes)

·        High tree canopy (23)

·        Diversity of housing size (21)

 

Whilst footpath and bike paths were identified as the top elements most valued and sought after for future neighbourhoods, feedback also indicated that more footpaths and bike paths were required and that some existing paths were unsafe and requiring repair.

 

Other comments received from Café Consult suggest:

·        There is a need for greater protection of street and canopy trees;

·        New development needs to be respectful of the existing neighbourhood character;

·        Improvements to road networks and pedestrian crossing are required;

·        Improvements need to be made to public safety;

·        Housing diversity is important, however housing needs to be appropriately located throughout the municipality based on size and style.

 

Consultation on Identification of Community Values

 

Six consultation sessions were scheduled between 13 November 2018 and 12 December 2018 to hear resident’s views in relation to:

·        What they value most about their area, and

·        What are the character elements that they would like to see changed or retained in their future neighbourhood.  

 

Council’s Your Say Maroondah website included an online feedback form, details of consultation sessions and a community bulletin.

 

Online feedback received included 32 responses for both questions from 23 separate individuals.

 

One of the most common character elements valued by the community was vegetation such as canopy trees, bushland, and natural habitat. 

 

Input from the community raised the need to retain the green and leafy nature of the area, particularly with increasing housing density.  The protection of vegetation was also identified as important, particularly regarding older gum trees and canopy trees.

 

Open spaces and the protection of older homes/weatherboard houses was also identified as important elements to be retained as they add significant character to neighbourhoods in areas such as Jubilee Park.

 

Safe streetscapes and pedestrian crossings were also identified as important elements to be enhanced as part of the future community.

Council received seven community bulletin responses from members of the public interested in sharing their thoughts on their neighbourhood character areas.

 

The community bulletin feedback response asked participants to discuss topics including:

·        What you value most about the landscape character of their area and suggest how it could be protected and enhanced;

·        What rules would you suggest be imposed on new development and are there any neighbourhood areas that require closer scrutiny;

·        Describe your favourite view in Maroondah and suggest how views can be protected;

·        Identify an area that has undergone positive change and suggest what could be done to encourage further change; and 

·        Identify a street that has undergone negative change.

 

Overall, the responses identified the following valued aspects of the neighbourhood areas namely:

·        Tall canopy trees;

·        Large gardens and open spaces;

·        The mix of exotic and native species and the wildlife it attracts;

·        Vistas and ridgelines; and

·        Low density that is sympathetic to nature.

 

Individual submissions were received from members of community groups and residents highlighting the following:

·        Existing landscapes, streetscape; history and liveability can be retained through change as long as change is carefully managed.

·        The Jubilee Park area should be protected from overdevelopment of town houses, three storey dwellings and apartments.  Noted that apartment complexes would be out of character for the area considering the topography of the area.

·        The conditions underpinning the use of the Low Density Residential Zone is no longer relevant as sites are now connected to sewerage. This particularly applies to related rezoning requests in the Ringwood North area.

·        Specific comments were received from two of the members of the Croydon Golf Links Estate Residents Association (CGLERA).  These noted that due to the Estate’s unique area with high landscape character values that create a strong sense of place, requested the estate to be recognised individually as part of the study review along with other high quality Significant Landscape Overlay areas to ensure their values are retained.  Also, submissions indicated that the most valued aspect of the neighbourhood includes the retention of existing canopy trees thus reducing the effect of climate change, preservation of indigenous remnant vegetation and wildlife habitat, low density built form which contributes to a sense of belonging and retention of canopy trees, and a pedestrian precinct country rural feel which contributes to the feel of a unique close neighbourhood.  The submissions noted the need to control site coverage, building to the topography and sympathetic design.

·        Concerning the Wyreena area, noted heritage attributes, especially Alwyn Street.  The area was previously covered by a ridgetop canopy protection scheme to maintain the treed ridgeline and to conserve the views across Croydon.  Ornamental trees originally planted by early settlers are a signature character of the area.  There is a need for protection of architectural styles including front and back gardens from the original streetscape.

-        Comments from the Croydon Conservation Society noted:

o   The value of canopy trees;

o   Mid-level undergrowth and street trees;

o   The erosion of wildlife caused by subdivision.;

o   The most efficient way to counteract climate change is planting trees in parks and street;

o   Need for commitment from Council for continued planting in parks and reserves.

In addition to a briefing of Councillors, copies of the report were set to the Ringwood Library Croydon Library; Realm and Croydon Civic Offices.

Issue / discussion

Following the community feedback during Stage 3 of the project, the Draft Neighbourhood Character Study Review Implementation Report has been prepared by Claire Scott Planning. 

 

The purpose of this Report is to determine and justify the most appropriate residential zoning for all character areas and precincts across Maroondah. Further, another component of this stage has been the preparation of neighbourhood character and landscape objectives for each of the residential character areas or precincts for inclusion into the schedules of the General Residential Zone (GRZ) and Neighbourhood Residential Zone (NRZ).

 

It is relevant to note that the Neighbourhood Character Study Review has been undertaken in the context of a number of Victorian Government led initiatives and recent Planning Panel decisions. These are detailed below.

 

Recent changes to Victorian Planning Provisions

 

Amendment VC110, published in the Government Gazette on 27 March 2017 made a number of changes to residential zones, with the intention of improving housing capacity and choice while protecting the openness and neighbourhood character of established residential areas across Victoria.

 

Key changes to the Residential Zones under the Victorian Planning Provisions of relevance to the current Neighbourhood Character Study Review include:

·        Revision of the purposes of the Neighbourhood Residential Zone and General Residential Zone.

·        Specifying that a schedule to the Neighbourhood Residential Zone must contain neighbourhood, heritage, environment, or landscape character objective.

·        Specifying that a schedule to the General Residential Zone may contain a neighbourhood character objective.

·        Removing the number of dwellings on a lot requirement in the Neighbourhood Residential Zone.

·        Inserting a minimum garden area requirement in the Neighbourhood Residential Zone and the General Residential Zone.

·        Introducing a default mandatory building height in the Neighbourhood Residential Zone (increase to 9 metres and storeys) and General Residential Zone increased to 11 metres and three storeys.

 

The recommendations of the Draft Neighbourhood Character Study Review Implementation Report propose to tailor the schedules to Maroondah’s residential zones to introduce site coverage, permeability and landscaping requirements and decision guidelines.

 

Panel Reports

 

In the recent Panel consideration of Amendment C107 for Ruskin Park, the Panel supported Council’s intention to make further changes to the Neighbourhood Residential Zone Schedule 6 (NRZ6) with appropriate variations as part of the Neighbourhood Character Study Review.


 

 

Key Findings and Recommendations

 

The recommendations of the Draft Neighbourhood Character Study Review Implementation Report note that the character of Maroondah is intrinsically linked to its natural landscape and vegetation cover. These elements are cherished by the local community, provide environmental, aesthetic and health benefits, and unify the otherwise diverse residential neighbourhoods.

 

Character

 

A balance between built form and vegetation should be maintained in all other residential areas of the municipality with the exception of precincts that have been targeted for growth.

 

Topography and vegetation, together with the siting and design of buildings, are the key considerations in the management of residential character within Maroondah. Depending on the identified characteristics and objectives for a particular area, the emphasis on each of these elements varies across neighbourhoods.

 

Site coverage and permeability

 

Minimum permeability requirements have been recommended to support the site coverage maximum, as each is integral to the ultimate success of achieving enough space to protect plants and sustain vegetation.

 

Built form

 

While the natural landscape and tree canopy cover is considered most important in protecting and managing the neighbourhood character of Maroondah, residential architecture and the composition of streetscapes (i.e. front setbacks, fencing treatment etc.) is strong and consistent with many areas.

 

Recommendations regarding built form responses are included in the proposed schedules to the residential zone.

 

Recommended changes to the Maroondah Planning Scheme

 

The findings of the Neighbourhood Character Study review are proposed to be implemented through the introduction of eleven (11) new schedules to the Neighborhood Residential Zone and two new schedules to the General Residential Zones.

 

The following is a list of the recommended new schedules to the residential zones under the Maroondah Planning Scheme:

 

Neighbourhood Residential Zone

·        Neighbourhood Residential Zone (NRZ1) Croydon Hills Estate, Birt’s Hill & Jumping Creek Valley

·        Neighbourhood Residential Zone (NRZ2) Wicklow Hills Ridgeline

·        Neighbourhood Residential Zone (NRZ3) Wicklow Hills Lower Slopes

·        Neighbourhood Residential Zone (NRZ4) Loughnan’s Hill

·        Neighbourhood Residential Zone (NRZ5) Jubilee Park

·        Neighbourhood Residential Zone (NRZ6) Ruskin Park

·        Neighbourhood Residential Zone (NRZ7) Warranwood Ridgeline and Slopes

·        Neighbourhood Residential Zone (NRZ8) Croydon Ridge and Southern Hills

·        Neighbourhood Residential Zone (NRZ9) Croydon Golf Links Estate

·        Neighbourhood Residential Zone (NRZ10) Bushland Fringes

·        Neighbourhood Residential Zone (NRZ11) Sites of Biological Significance

 

General Residential Zone

·        General Residential Zone 1 Garden Suburban

·        General Residential Zone 2 Bush Garden Slopes

 

Additional Residential Zones are recommended for Maroondah designated Major Activity centres and Neighbourhood Activity Centres.

 

Residential Growth Zone

·        Residential Growth Zone Schedule 1 (RGZ1) Ringwood MAC Residential Growth Precinct

·        Residential Growth Zone Schedule 2 (RGZ2) Croydon MAC Residential Growth Precinct

·        Residential Growth Zone Schedule 3 (RGZ3) Ringwood East NAC Residential Growth Precinct

·        Residential Growth Zone Schedule 4 (RGZ4) Ringwood East NAC Strategic Residential Growth Precinct

·        Residential Growth Zone Schedule 5 (RGZ5) Heathmont NAC Residential Growth Precinct

 

General Residential Zone

·        General Residential Zone Schedule 3 (GRZ3) Ringwood East NAC Neighbourhood Consolidation Precinct

·        General Residential Zone Schedule 4 (GRZ4) Ringwood East NAC Residential Regeneration Precinct

·        General Residential Zone Schedule 5 (GRZ5) Heathmont NAC Bush Residential Growth precinct

·        General Residential Zone Schedule 6 (GRZ6) Heathmont NAC Special Residential Precinct

The Report also includes several further implementation recommendations including:

·        Rezoning from General Residential Zone to Neighbourhood Residential Zone: the north eastern extent of Loughnan-Warranwood Ridgelines.

·        Western section of a Hill slope that forms part of the Wicklow Hills Ridgelines.

·        Rezone from Low Density Residential Zone two semi-rural areas adjacent to the municipal boundary to Neighbourhood Residential Zone.

·        Rezone from Neighbourhood Residential to General Residential Zone two small precincts.

·        Update the current provisions of the Neighbourhood Character Overlay 1 for Alto Avenue and Wicklow Hills; and Neighbourhood Character Overlay NCO2 - Croydon Hills Estate.

·        Strengthen Schedule 3 and 4 to the Significant Landscape Overlay as it applies to Wicklow Hills Ridge and Loughnan Warranwood Ridge Landscape Protection area and the northern part of the proposed General Residential Zone 2 Bush Garden Slopes.

·        Implement the findings of the Ringwood East and Heathmont Neighbourhood Activity Centres.

Financial / economic issues

The Neighbourhood Character Study Review Project has been funded within the existing Council budget.

Environmental / amenity issues

The Neighbourhood Character Study Review Project serves multiple objectives that relate to liveability, sense of place, environmental outcomes and resilience as the climate change.  The proposed recommendations of the review will strengthen the provisions of the Maroondah Planning Scheme to achieve outcomes including:

·        Reduced visual impact of development;

·        Enhanced support for biodiversity and provision of habitat for fauna

·        Improved water quality and mitigation of extreme rainfall events

·        Moderation of the urban heat island effect

·        Improved air quality and environmental outcomes

·        Improved community health and wellbeing

Social / community issues

Implementing the recommendations arising from the Neighbourhood Character Study Review will have positive long term social and community impacts. This will provide further certainty to residents and developers as to the expectations on the preferred neighbourhood character for a particular area.  The consultation stage of the review has ensured that community feedback can shape how valued neighbourhood character elements can be protected by the recommended planning controls.

 

Further consultation will be undertaken with the as part of a subsequent planning scheme amendment process.

 

The review leaves Council well placed to respond to policy directions to provide additional housing supply in the municipality combined with ensuring valued elements of neighbourhood character are protected.

Community consultation

It is proposed to exhibit the Draft Neighbourhood Character Study Review Implementation Report as part of Stage 4 of the Neighbourhood Character Study Review to key stakeholders and the general community.  This will be done from 13 May 2019 to 7 June 2019 via the following:

·        Provision of an update and feedback platform as part of the Your Say Maroondah City Council website

·        Two community information sessions

·        Notices in the Maroondah Leader newspaper

·        Provision of hard copies in Council service centres, libraries and community centres

Feedback received will be considered as part of Stage 5 of the project. Council is expected to consider the Final Report at its July 2019 meeting.

Conclusion

The natural landscape and vegetation coverage across the City of Maroondah are integral to residential character. The undulating topography and native tree canopy cover of the municipality, along with the views to the Dandenong Ranges, are highly valued and contribute significantly to local people’s connection to place.

 

This review responds to recent State Government policy changes to planning provisions, current development pressures and changes to the character of the residential areas over recent years.

 

The Draft Neighbourhood Character Study Review Implementation Report presents the findings and recommendations of this review, including the areas of significance and the proposed changes to the existing planning controls within the Maroondah Planning Scheme.

 

Council authorisation is sought to release the Draft Neighbourhood Character Study Review Implementation Report for community feedback from 13 May 2019 to 7 June 2019.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Draft Neighbourhood Character Study Review Implementation Report - April 2019

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL NOTES THE DRAFT NEIGHBOURHOOD CHARACTER STUDY REVIEW IMPLEMENTATION REPORT AND RELEASES IT FOR COMMUNITY CONSULTATION

 

  


Director Development & Amenity Andrew Fuaux

 

Municipal Fire Management Plan

Item 1

 

Purpose

The purpose of this report is to seek endorsement by Council for the Municipal Fire Management Plan 2019-2022(MFMP) to be made available for community consultation.  This plan has been developed pursuant to section 20(1) of the Emergency Management Act 1986 & 2013 and deemed to fulfil Section 55 of the Country Fire Authority Act 1958.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions are contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that consider the needs and aspirations of all ages and population groups.  Council will provide strong and responsive leadership, ensuring transparency, while working with the community to advocate for and ‘champion’ local needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.5     Work in partnership with key agencies and other levels of government to provide leadership in emergency preparedness, response, and recovery processes

Background

The draft Municipal Fire Management Plan 2019-2022 (MFMP) has been developed by the Municipal Fire Management Planning Committee (MFMPC). The MFMPC is represented by Maroondah Council, Metro Trains, Victoria Police, Fire Agencies, and local Fire Brigade representatives. The Committee is chaired by Country Fire Authority (CFA). Council acts as executive support.

 

The Municipal Fire Management Planning Committee (MFMPC) is responsible for developing the MFMP, ensuring implementation of agreed actions and monitoring the effectiveness of those actions.

Issue / discussion

The Municipal Fire Management Plan includes both the process undertaken to develop the plan, and the outcomes of this collaborative process.  It meets the requirements set out in the CFA Act for municipal fire prevention planning.  This plan is not intended to duplicate existing agency plans but to consolidate and coordinate the range of plans that exist within Maroondah City Council’s municipal area.

Financial / economic issues

The MFMP is a sub plan of the Municipal Emergency Management Plan (MEMP). Financial accounting for municipal resources utilised in emergencies must be authorised by the Municipal Emergency Resources Officer (MERO) or the Municipal Recovery Manager (MRM) and shall be in accordance with the normal financial arrangements of Council.  

 

Depending on the magnitude of the emergency, Government financial assistance may be available for prevention, response and recovery activities. Council officers work closely with the Department of Treasury and Finance to recoup these costs.

 

Maroondah Council is also a signatory to the ‘Protocol for Inter-Council Emergency Management Resource Sharing’ coordinated by the Municipal Association of Victoria. The Protocol provides an agreed position between councils for the provision of assistance between councils for response and recovery activities.

Social / community issues

The Municipal Fire Management Planning process aims to achieve community focussed outcomes during emergencies. Previous emergency history, such as Black Saturday, has shown that all agencies, levels of government, and community working together are required to reduce the likelihood, effect, and consequences of emergencies on communities.

Community consultation

The MFMP is always available on Council’s website and residents are invited to contribute to and provide feedback about the Plan on an ongoing basis.

 

The draft Municipal Fire Management Plan 2019-2022 will now be made available for community consultation from 1 May - 31 May 2019. Feedback will be collated and presented to the Municipal Fire Management Planning Committee in late June.

Conclusion

Maroondah City Council is obliged to develop and maintain a Municipal Fire  Management Plan pursuant to section 20(1) of the Emergency Management Act 1986 & 2013 and deemed to fulfil Section 55 of the CFA Act 1958.  A requirement of the plan is that Council endorses this report for the Municipal Fire Management Plan to be made available for community consultation.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Municipal Fire  Management Plan 2019-2022 - DRAFT

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL ENDORSES THE MAROONDAH CITY COUNCIL MUNICIPAL FIRE MANAGEMENT PLAN (2019-2022) TO BE MADE AVAILABLE FOR COMMUNITY CONSULTATION FOR THE PERIOD OF 1 MAY - 31 MAY 2019