2014 Maroondah Logo RGB.jpg

 

 

Councillor

(as addressed)

 

 

The next Council Meeting will be held in the Council Chamber, Braeside Avenue, Ringwood, on Monday 29 October 2018, commencing at 7:30pm and your presence is requested.

 

 

Yours faithfully

SKozlows.jpg

 

Steve Kozlowski

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

Note:

This meeting is being streamed live on the internet and recorded.

Every care is taken to maintain privacy and attendees are advised they may be recorded.

 

Logo2

Council Chamber
is fitted with a Hearing Aid Induction Loop

 

Switch Hearing Aid to ‘T’ for Reception

 

City Offices

Braeside Avenue, Ringwood, 3134

Postal

PO Box 156, Ringwood 3134

DX 38068, Ringwood

Telephone

1300 88 22 33

 

 

Facsimile

Email

Web

 

Service Centres

Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS): 131 450

National Relay Service (NRS): 133 677

(03) 9298 4345

maroondah@maroondah.vic.gov.au

www.maroondah.vic.gov.au

 

Croydon: Civic Square

REALM: 179 Maroondah Hwy, Ringwood

 


 

 


ORDER OF BUSINESS

1.       Prayer

2.       Acknowledgement of Country

3.       Apologies  

4.       Declaration of Interests

5.       Confirmation of Minutes of the Ordinary Council Meeting held on Monday 17 September 2018.

6.       Public Questions

7.       Officers’ Reports

Director Corporate Services

1.       Attendance Report                                                                                                    5

2.       Reports of Assembly of Councillors                                                                         7

3.       Councillor Representation Reports                                                                        10

4.       Councillors Quarterly Expense and Reimbursement Report - July to September 2018                                                                                                                                12

5.       Eastern Regional Libraries Corporation July - September 2018 Report on the Provision of Library Services                                                                                  15

6.       Outcomes of Maroondah Motions to the Municipal Association of Victoria State Council Meeting                                                                                                      28

Director Operations, Assets & Leisure

1.       Maroondah Carols 2018                                                                                         31

Acting Director Strategy & Community

1.       Ringwood East Shopping Centre - Declaration of Special Rate Scheme             34

2.       Formal Consideration of Annual Report 2017/18 and Our Achievements Document                                                                                                                                45

3.       Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018/19) - Quarter 1 Progress Report             48

Director Development & Amenity

1.       Maroondah Public Lighting Policy                                                                          51

2.       Petition - Heathmont Village Shopping Centre - Request for Two 15 Minute Parking Bays                                                                                                                        58   

8.       Motions to Review   

9.       Late Item

10.     Requests / Leave of Absence

11.     In Camera

Director Development & Amenity

1.       Tender Evaluation Report – Contract 20892 Caroline Street Reconstruction  

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Attendance Report

Item 1

 

Purpose

To provide an opportunity for Councillors to report on Council activities undertaken since the last Ordinary Meeting of Council and forthcoming ward activities.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

Not Applicable

Issue / discussion

It is intended that the Mayor and Councillors be given the opportunity to present a verbal or written report updating Council on the activities they have undertaken in their role as Councillors and forthcoming ward activities.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

It is appropriate that Councillors formally report to Council upon the activities they have undertaken in their role as Councillors.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE REPORTS AS PRESENTED BY

COUNCILLORS

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Reports of Assembly of Councillors

Item 2

 

Purpose

To present the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings at the City Offices Ringwood, usually two weeks prior to the formal Council Meeting, and to note the issues discussed.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

An Assembly of Councillors, as defined under the Local Government Act 1989 [s.3], is a planned or scheduled meeting, comprising at least five (5) Councillors and one (1) member of Council staff, that considers matters that are intended or likely to be:

 

·        the subject of a decision of the Council; or

·        subject to the exercise of a delegated function, duty or power of Council

Examples of an Assembly of Councillors may include:

 

·        Councillor Briefings (which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings),

·        On-site inspections,

·        Consultative Meetings with residents, developers, consultants,

·        Panel Hearings conducted under s223 of the Act,

·        Meetings with local organisations, Government Departments, statutory authorities, and local politicians

Issue / discussion

As part of decision making processes at Maroondah, it is essential that Councillors are briefed on a range of issues which come before Council for consideration.  As a means of providing this information, Assembly of Councillors briefings are conducted.

 

Assemblies are also attended by Council Officers, and sometimes other specific advisors, to provide Councillors with a detailed knowledge and understanding of issues under consideration to a level of detail that would inhibit timely decision-making, that would not be possible in an open Council meeting, where decision-making related debate is governed by strict meeting procedures.

 

The intent of this report is to present the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings, and to note the items discussed.  This information is already available to the public upon request in accordance with the Local Government Act [s.80A].

 

This report and attachments formally table the information items previously covered by Councillors.

 

The ‘Public Record’ of the Assembly of Councillors briefings held on 17 September 2018 and 8 October 2018 is attached for information.

 

The items contained therein were noted.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

Assembly of Councillors briefings are important forums for advice and discussion, on what are often complex issues facing the municipality, in the lead up to formal decisions being made by Councillors at Council Meetings.  At Assemblies, or outside them, Councillors also have the opportunity of requesting additional information to assist in the decision making process.

 

It is appropriate that the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings at the City Offices Ringwood, usually two weeks prior to the formal Council Meeting, be noted at a formal meeting of Council.


 

 

Attachments

1.

2018 September 17 - Assembly of Councillors Public Record

2.

2018 October 08 - Assembly of Councillors Public Record

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE PUBLIC RECORD OF THE ASSEMBLY OF COUNCILLORS BRIEFINGS HELD ON 17 September 2018 and 8 october 2018

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Councillor Representation Reports

Item 3

 

Purpose

To receive and note the following meeting minutes.

·        Maroondah Environment Advisory Committee (MEAC) Minutes held on 28 August 2018

·        Maroondah Arts Advisory Committee Minutes held on 29 August 2018

·        Maroondah Partners In Community Wellbeing Committee Minutes held on 11 September 2018

·        Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee (MDAC) Minutes held on 13 September 2018

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable.

Background

As part of Council's commitment to the principles and practice of good governance, it is appropriate that Councillors and the Community are formally updated on the actions and activities of the various organisations bodies/advisory groups upon which it is represented.

 Issue / discussion

Council is represented on numerous Boards and Organisations. Appointments are made annually by Council at the commencement of the new Mayoral term.

 

Crs Graham, Macdonald and Mazzuchelli are Council’s representatives at the Maroondah Environment Advisory Committee (MEAC).

 

Crs Symon, Spears and Graham are Council’s representatives at the Maroondah Arts Advisory Committee.

 

Crs Graham and Mazzuchelli are Council’s representatives at the Maroondah Partners In Community Wellbeing Committee (MPIC).

 

Cr Spears and Dib are Council’s representatives at the Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee (MDAC).

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

 

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

 

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

It is appropriate that Councillors and the Community are formally updated on the actions and activities of the various organisations bodies/advisory groups upon which Council is represented.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Maroondah Environment Advisory Committee Minutes (MEAC) - 28 August 2018

2.

Maroondah Arts Advisory Committee Minutes - 29 August 2018

3.

Maroondah Partners In Community Wellbeing Committee Minutes (MPIC) - 11 September 2018

4.

Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee (MDAC) Meeting Minutes - 13 September 2018

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES the MINUTES of the following:

1.       maroondah environment advisory committee (MEAC) held on 28 august 2018

2.       Maroondah arts advisory committee held on 29 August 2018

3.       maroondah partners in community wellbeing committee (MPIC) held on 11 September 2018

4.       Maroondah disability advisory committee (MDAC) held on 13 september 2018

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Councillors Quarterly Expense and Reimbursement Report - July to September 2018

Item 4

 

Purpose

To provide a report to the community on Councillor expenses.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community.

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an empowered community that is actively engaged in council decision making through processes that consider the needs and aspirations of all ages and population groups.  Council will provide strong and responsive leadership, ensuring transparency, while working with the community to advocate for and ‘champion’ local needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable.

Background

The Councillor Expenses, Support and Reimbursement Policy was adopted by Council on 27 March 2017.

In accordance with Section 75 of the Local Government Act 1989, Council is required to reimburse a Councillor for expenses incurred whilst performing his or her duties as a Councillor. Council is also required to adopt and maintain a Policy in relation to the reimbursement of expenses for Councillors. The Policy provides guidance for the payment of reimbursements of expenses and the provision of resources, facilities and other support to the Mayor and Councillors to enable them to discharge their duties.

 

Council also publishes in its Annual Report the details of the expenses, including reimbursement of expenses for each Councillor and member of a Council Committee paid by the Council. The details of the expenses for the past financial year are set out in the 2017/18 Annual Report.

Issue / discussion

This is a standard Governance reporting item.

Financial / economic issues

A budget of $102,000 in the 2018/2019 financial year exists for the expenses and reimbursement of Councillors. A budget of $12,000 is allocated to the Office of the Mayor for the provision of a vehicle for the November 2017 – November 2018 Mayoral term.

Councillor

TR

($)

CM

($)

CC

($)

IC

($)

CT

($)

CCA

($)

Total

July to Sept

($)

Tony Dib JP

 

0

0

0

253.75

0

0

253.75

Paul Macdonald

 

214.36

0

0

258.36

1,199.55

567.97

2,240.24

Kylie Spears

 

65.79

0

0

213.10

494.09

1,090.95

1,863.93

Nora Lamont

Mayor

0

3,000.00#

0

196.98

494.09

535.15

4,226.22

Samantha Mazzuchelli

 

0

0

0

209.38

0

0

209.38

Mike Symon

Deputy Mayor

 

45.45

92.04

0

212.63

1,639.96

421.82

2,411.90

Marijke Graham

 

252.25

0

0

199.50

885.27

399.76

1,736.78

Tasa Damante

 

0

0

394.92

202.83

450.00

414.69

1,462.44

Rob Steane

 

165.09

0

0

226.54

0

443.15

834.78

TOTAL

 

$742.94

$3,092.04#

$394.92

$1,973.07

$5,162.96

$3,873.49

$15,239.42

 

 

Legend: TR-Travel, CM-Car Mileage (# a budget allocation of $12,000 is allocated to the Office of the Mayor for the provision of a vehicle for the Nov 17 – Nov 18 Mayoral term), CC-Child Care, IC-Information and Communication expenses, CT- Conferences and Training expenses, CCA-Civic and Community Attendance

 

Note: No expenses were paid by Council including reimbursements to members of Council Committees during the year.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

Not Applicable

 

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL NOTES THE COUNCILLORS EXPENSE AND REIMBURSEMENT REPORT FOR JULY TO SEPTEMBER 2018

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Eastern Regional Libraries Corporation July - September 2018 report on the provision of library services

Item 5

 

Purpose

To outline the activity of this service for this period, given the significant partnership and service to Maroondah residents, ratepayers and visitors.

Strategic / policy issues

A safe, healthy and active community

A prosperous and learning community

A vibrant and culturally rich community

A clean, green sustainable community

An accessible and connected community

An attractive, thriving and well-built community

An inclusive and diverse community

A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision: Maroondah will be a vibrant and diverse City with a healthy and active community, living in green and leafy neighbourhoods which are connected to thriving and accessible activity centres contributing to a prosperous economy within a safe, inclusive and sustainable environment.

Key Directions 2017-2021:

1.3       Promote and facilitate safer cultures relating to issues of alcohol, drugs, tobacco, gambling, child abuse and family violence.

1.5       Facilitate the provision of affordable, accessible and responsive services, resources and initiatives that support the physical and mental health and wellbeing of the community.

1.6       Actively promote health and wellbeing principles and initiatives within the community.

2.15     Facilitate and encourage the provision of world-class life-long learning opportunities in Maroondah, from early learning through to adult and tertiary levels.

2.17     Facilitate and encourage places, spaces and programming that provide for a third place of community connection beyond home and work.

3.5       Support and celebrate the unique cultures of emerging communities in Maroondah.

Background

Maroondah City Council's library services are provided by the Eastern Regional Libraries Corporation (ERLC).  As part of a Regional Library Agreement, ERLC provides library services also to Knox City and Yarra Ranges Councils. The estimated population of its Member Councils (approximately 435,000) makes ERLC the largest public library service in Victoria.

 

Based on the results of the annual survey of Victorian Public Libraries 2017/18 (of which there are 47) ERLC is also number 1 based on:

·        Library Visits – 2,088,110

·        Turnover Rate (Physical Items) - each item in our collection goes out an average of 9.7 times per year. The average for Victoria is 5.3.

·        Loans — 3,586,530 - when you add together the number of loans of physical items (3,091,715) with the number of eLoans of Items (494,815)

The independent annual Syndicate Survey for 2016/17 (next biannual survey is 2018/19) shows that 57% of users rate ERLC's service as between 9 and 10 (where 10 is very satisfied). The overall rating was 8.5 out of 10 for the key areas of courtesy, helpfulness, knowledge, reference and information services, up on the 8.45 of 2016/17.

From the results of the annual survey of Victorian Public Libraries, these results were achieved where for ERLC the:

·        cost library service per capita is $23.64 (lowest in the State) compared to the State average of $40.95;

·        cost library service per visit is $4.78 compared to the State average of $6.57; and

·        number of Equivalent Full Time (EFT) staff is 0.21 compared to the State average of 0.29

Issue / discussion

Overall Maroondah library services are experiencing considerable growth. The major reason for this growth is the opening of the new Realm Library in October 2015.

 

During the temporary relocation of the Ringwood Library to Warrandyte Road, Ringwood Library lost its position at the highest ranked library branch in the Region for almost every service area. Since the opening of Realm, it has resumed its No 1 position in most service areas. Croydon library which gained some 'business' from the relocated library has maintained its very strong position in relation to the Region. Only Knox Library, which is based in a major Westfield Shopping Centre, comes between either Realm and Croydon being the No 1 or 2 library branch for the Region in almost all service areas.

Based on ERLC regional Year to Date (YTD) statistics, Realm and Croydon rank as follows.

Memberships YTD: Realm is ranked No 1 - 42,304, and Croydon No 3 – 26,318

Maroondah memberships have increased by 4.02% year to date.

 

 

2018/19

2017/18

Croydon

26,318

25,782

Realm

42,304

40,185

Maroondah Total

68,622

65,967

 

 

 

Visits YTD: Realm (No 1) and Croydon (No 3) with Visits having decreased by -0.40% in a YTD comparison. The overall decrease is a combination of a reduction of 8,545 visits for Croydon and an increase of 7,657 for Realm. This could be a result of new people counting systems introduced this quarter and will be monitored over the next few months for any significant variations.

 

 

2018/19

2017/18

Croydon

68,463

77,008

Realm

152,535

144,878

Maroondah Total

220,998

221,886

 

 

Loans YTD: Croydon is ranked No 1 – 138,763 and Realm No 3 – 109,193

Loans overall have increased by 5.95% in a YTD comparison.

 

 

2018/19

2017/18

Croydon

138,763

136,522

Realm

109,193

97,511

Maroondah Total

247,956

234,033

 

 

Public Enquiries: Realm is ranked No 2 – 10,637 and Croydon No 3 – 8,661.

Enquiries overall have increased by 29.50%.

 

 

2018/19

2017/18

Croydon

8,661

7,255

Realm

10,637

7,647

Maroondah Total

19,298

14,902

 

Public PCs Sessions: Realm is ranked No 1 — 10,814 and Croydon No 3 — 6,355.

Overall PC sessions are down YTD by 6.95%. This reflects the position across the region and the further growth in WiFi sessions.

 

 

2018/19

2017/18

Croydon

6,355

7,155

Realm

10,814

11,297

Maroondah Total

17,169

18,452

 

 

 

 

WiFi Sessions: Realm ranks 1 and Croydon ranks No 4 in the region after Rowville and Knox. Overall sessions are up by 19.38%.

 

 

2018/19

2017/18

Croydon

9,106

7,989

Realm

42,789

35,481

Maroondah Total

51,895

43,470

 

Programs & Events

Maroondah libraries have proved to be very popular for adult, children's and youth programs and events. Over 4,606 adults and 6,373 children/parents have attended various activities to date this year. Just some of these programs and events include: 

 

Children's and Youth Programs & Events

 

Children's & Youth Programs Attendances

 

Over 6,373 people attended 140 children’s and youth programs.

 

Programs for Adults/Juniors, Schools and Children which run at either or both locations include:

·        Pre-school activities

·        After School club

·        Tiny Tots

·        Toddlertime

·        Holiday programs

·        Teenage activities

·        Other group visits to library

·        Saturday story times

·        Festivals

·        External visits (to schools etc.)

·        School visits to Library

·        Pre-school visits to library

 

Storytimes

Storytime is popular at Realm and Croydon Library. 5,804 people have attended various activities to date this year.

Weekly Storytimes sessions are as follows:

 

 

 

Croydon*

Realm**

Tinytots

0 – 12 months

1

1

Toddlers**

1 – 3 years

1

1

Preschoolers

3 – 5 years

1

1

Family

1 - 5 years

 

1

Family Saturday

1 - 5 years

1

1

* Croydon’s Toddler’s storytime is also presented through Auslan once a month.

** Storytimes are so popular at Realm that a booking system has had to be introduced.

 

 

1000 Books Before School

1000 Books Before School is a state-wide reading program designed to build up children’s early literacy through a wide range of reading experiences. Parents register their children through their local library. Over 1,000 children have joined the program through ERLC and 18 children have completed 1000 books.

At mid-year the following milestones had been reached:

 

93 children reach the first milestone (100 books read)

48 children reach the second milestone (250 books read)

23 children reach the third milestone (500 books read)

18 children reach the fourth milestone (750 books read)

17 children reach the fifth milestone (1000 books read) 

 

Chinese Language Storytime

At the start of Term 3 a Chinese language storytime was introduced at Realm. The storytime is delivered by two experienced storytellers through their company ‘A Little Chinese Adventure’.

 

The response has been fantastic with over 30 families turning up to each session. The audience is predominantly Chinese parents and grandparents with their children. However, some non-Chinese families are bringing their children to experience storytime in another language.

 

This program has enabled us to enrich the literacy offerings at ERLC and extend our reach into the Mandarin speaking community.

 

 

 

Local Kindergartens, Playgroups and Child Care Centres

Youth Services Librarians visit many of the local kindergartens, playgroups and child care centres once a term to read stories and promote the library to mostly 3 and 4 year olds. Across Maroondah, 23 visits have been made year to date.

School Holiday Program

Some the events during the school holidays included:

 

The kids at Croydon Community Library had super crafty activities. Bugs galore and paper plate weaving activities produced some very colourful creations.

 

A wonderful chain reaction contraption made at Realm Library during school holidays. Children learned how to make Rube Goldberg machines, this one stops at a traffic light! 

 

STEAM Sessions

Steam activities in the last quarter included:

 

National Science Week 13–17 August

This year we made a big commitment to Science Week and designed a program of events for all ages across the branches.

 

Science Week Seed grant

ERLC was a successful applicant for a small Science Week Seed grant from The Royal Society of Victoria, which will allow us to purchase more equipment. RSV also sent Science Week t-shirts, caps and umbrellas which were given away to enthusiastic participants.

 

‘Breakfast with the Stars’.

The week began with the ‘Breakfast with the Stars’. The breakfast speakers were Victoria’s Lead Scientist Dr Amanda Caples and environmentalist (and scientist with dyslexia) Dr Grainne Cleary. The forum was well received by Councillors, students from local schools and Council and ERL staff.

 

Collections

 

Books/DVDs/ etc.

Approximately 75% of the collection is under 5 years old. On average each item year to date has been borrowed 2.73 times, which is greater than the regional average of 2.45.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JULY 2018 TO SEPTEMBER 2019

MAROONDAH

REGION

19. Library collection usage.

Numerator - Number of library collection item loans

289,070

954,689

Denominator - Number of library collection items

105,746

389,382

Loans per Item

2.73

2.45

20. Standard of library collection

Numerator - Number of library collection items purchased in the last 5 years

78,723

291,932

Denominator - Number of library collection items

105,746

389,382

% purchased in last 5 years

74.45%

74.97%

 

Digital Library Statistics Major Platforms - Year to Date

Based on the single metric of loans generated, our four major digital platforms would make this area our busiest ‘branch’ year to date.

 

Platform

 

YTD

Overdrive

eItems borrowed

111,504

Borrowbox

eItems borrowed

12,423

Rbdigital - OneClick

eAudiobooks borrowed

1,064

Rbdigital - Zinio

eMagazines borrowed

18,992

 

 

143,983

 

Together We Read

OverDrive (ERL’s major eBook provider) set up a special ‘Together We Read’ for Australia and New Zealand library members only.The book chosen was ‘The Love That I Have’ by James Moloney.

 

Members could read the same digital book at the same time without any wait lists or holds. Participating in this event allowed ERL to offer a new simultaneous use title community-wide at no cost. In addition to access to the book, members could visit the Together We Read discussion page to share their thoughts. Members also had access to OverDrive’s podcast interview with the author.

 

In the two week period that members had open access to the eBook it was downloaded 239 times.

 


 

BusyCode

Busy Code introduces Primary School aged children (7 -11) to coding and teaches them the fundamentals of how to create, run and debug simple programs. They have lots of fun making BusyCode’s ‘Beard Man’ walk and dance to a disco beat!

 

There are five areas in BusyCode - each progressing in difficulty. Within each area are three activity types - tutorials, challenges and projects.

 

Tutorials - simple and fun, introducing new programming concepts step by step.

Challenges – children are given problems to solve using the concepts that have been introduced in the tutorials.

Projects – open-ended tasks that let children experiment with the concepts they have learnt. Allowing them to be creative and see how the changes they make can alter the program.

 

Our Digital Literacy Officers have already been demonstrating this new Online Resource in local Primary Schools.

 

Storytime PADS – Engage. Entertain. Educate. – Croydon & Realm

ERL has purchased 4 Storytime PADS to complement the children’s PCs that we already offer in the branches. The content provided covers the ages 2 to 8. They provide a wide variety of ‘edutainment’ resources – including Busythings, ABC Kids videos, StoryBox Library, puzzles and animated picture books in a number of LOTE languages, including Mandarin Chinese.

 

The PADS located at Croydon and Realm and are already proving very popular with our younger members.

 

Partnerships

 

Authors and Mental Illness – Croydon Community School and Eastern Health

Students from Croydon Community School visited the Library to hear from authors with lived experience of mental illness. This event was organised in conjunction with Eastern Health Adult Mental Health Program for Families where a Parent has a Mental Illness. The speakers were:

·        David Miller, author of Big and me

·        Michelle Williams author of My happy sad Mummy

·        Kim Hodges, author of Girl on the edge and Girl over the edge

 

Library Bags

A new partnership with Coonara Community House sees some of our library bags being made by volunteers. Although a little more expensive that the usual bags, it is hoped that the fact they are made from recycled materials and by Coonara volunteers will help sales.

 

Libraries Change Lives

Libraries Change Lives is a collaboration between PLV, the peak body for Victoria’s public library services, and State Library Victoria.

 

Libraries Change Lives is a sector-wide advocacy campaign that aims to start a conversation about the value and impact of Victoria’s public libraries, and the role they play in healthy communities.

The three-year campaign will demonstrate the pivotal contribution libraries make to Victoria, while presenting opportunities to further their role in early years’ literacy, digital and STEM learning, the provision of shared community spaces and universal access to information and services. The State Government Election in November 2018 presents a key opportunity for the public library sector to start talking to all sides of politics.

 

Adult Programs Attendances YTD: 4,606 people have attended events year to date.

Programs which run at either or both locations are:

·        Author Talks/Workshops

·        Book chat/Book club

·        Family History

·        Monthly Clubs

·        Friendship Groups

·        External Visits

·        Military History

 

26:52 Reading Challenge – read 26 books in 52 weeks.

 

There has been a phenomenal response to the inaugural Reading Challenge – over 816 members had taken up the gauntlet and are reading books outside their comfort zone.

 

Some of the challenges are: ‘Read a book published before 1850’, ‘Read a book that is set in Asia’ and ‘Listen to an audiobook or eAudiobook’.

 

The oldest registered member is 83 years young and the youngest is 12 years old. Those who complete the challenge will go into the draw for a literary lovers prize pack.

 

14 have completed all of the challenges with another 100 or so getting close to finishing.... only another 76 days to go......

 


 

Bookchats

Croydon and Realm host two and one ‘chats’ respectively every month.

Bookclub Program

ERLC’s Bookclub program provides sets of 10 books for Bookclubs to borrow. Both Croydon and Realm have 37 Bookclubs respectively.

 

Currently ERLC has over 400 Bookclub sets. 50-70 new sets are added to the collection each year. Titles include classic and contemporary fiction, memoirs, biographies and general non-fiction. We welcome suggestions for titles from the Bookclubs as well as ERLC staff members.

 

The Bookclub fee for 2017 is $350 per Bookclub. This entitles the group to receive a Bookclub set, delivered to the branch of their choice, each month with a loan period of six weeks.

 

Author Talks

 

Caroline Jane Knight: Croydon Community Library

Caroline Jane Knight returned to ERLC, this time to the Croydon Community Library, for another sell-out talk on growing up in Jane Austen’s family home and the long shadow cast by her famous great-great-great-great-great aunt.

 

Ed Husain: Realm Library

British writer Ed Husain was in conversation with Tasneem Chopra as part of Melbourne Writers Festival Local Libraries program. His latest book ‘The house of Islam’ provided fertile territory for a discussion on the origins of Islam and its current place in the world.

 

Rosalie Ham: Realm's 'Brunch with an Author'

We were very lucky to get the inside scoop from Rosalie and see some wonderful photos of the filming of "The Dressmaker". Rosalie had the exciting experience of being cast as an extra and rubbing shoulders with the likes of stars Kate Winslet and Liam Hemsworth. Rosalie's latest novel "The Year of the Farmer" was hot off the press.

 

Sue Williams: Realm Library

Part of the ‘Brunch with an author’ series, Sue Williams, the creator of fish and chip shop owner and unlicensed private investigator Cass Tuplin and her home town of Rusty Bore (pop 147), discussed how crime fiction and comedy can be woven together and the trials and tribulations of creating a fictional Australian country town (without offending anyone).

 

Other Adult Events

 

Vivienne's Felted Balls Workshop: Croydon Community Library

A lot of laughs were heard from this friendly group of ladies who attended Vivienne's Felted Balls workshop at Croydon. They enjoyed learning a new craft with a beautiful selection of wool and each other’s company.

 

Dr. Rachael Livermore: Realm Library

An appreciative audience learned about the birth of galaxies in the early universe at this very special library event.

 

Mood-busting Bookchat: Realm Library

Realm Library's new wellness collection has inspired the launch a new bookchat, focused on books which are inspiring, uplifting and positive. These might be books that people turn to in tough times, books that are old favourites, or maybe books that are read by a cosy fireplace or while on a bright summer holiday.

 

 

 

Social & Technology Events

 

Genie Exchanges

Sessions were held at Croydon to provide opportunities to meet fellow genealogists in the local area. Research stories were swapped, genealogists helped each other and in turn were helped with their own research.

 

Ask our Experts Sessions

Croydon offers one hour appointments with ERLC specialised staff to receive help with:

·        Family History searching

·        Newspaper articles

·        Library databases

·        Research questions

 

Open Technology Q&A

Informal Q&A with ERLC’s technology team every second Wednesday.

 

Conversation Cafe

Every Friday at Realm there is an opportunity for our community members for whom English is their second language to meet over a cuppa.

 

TECHNOLOGY

 

Public PCs Reimaged

The Corporation’s new PC booking software, developed internally and known as PC Connect, is in its final stages of lab testing. It is being partnered with security and administration policy changes regarding how the public PCs clear themselves between user sessions. The new system will be faster and more accessible for members. This industry leading solution is also scheduled for by December.

 

RFID Software Upgrades

In early September the RFID software solution in use on all staff workstation PCs was replaced with a more modern suite. The new software is considerably faster for the team to use, easier to install and is no longer dependent on library management system (LMS) particulars. This affords the Corporation the flexibility to change LMS providers at any stage in the future without complex and costly RFID solution upgrades.


 

Website Hosting Migration

As more of the Corporation’s systems move into the cloud, the underling managed hosting environment has moved to its own dedicated virtual server hosted on state of the art infrastructure. Significant performance improvements have been observed however the main advantage will be its ability to support the Corporation’s growing cloud data storage requirements, as well as all the public PCs which will make constant connections in the near future. The migration process concluded in September.

Financial / economic issues

The Maroondah City Council contributes in the order of $2.5m for this service for services at Croydon and Realm per annum.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not applicable.

Social / community issues

As outlined under the Strategic/Policy Issues heading above, the library service is a very significant universal service for all members of the community. Council seeks to ensure increases in productivity and efficiencies don't impact on the services but continue to enhance the Maroondah residents’ library experience.

Community consultation

Not applicable.

Conclusion

Council's Library service provided by the Eastern Regional Library Service provides a highly valued universal service to the Maroondah Community at both Realm and Croydon sites as outlined. The first three months reporting in the 18/19 year demonstrates high membership, visits, loans, public enquiries, public pc activities, Wi-Fi, adult, children and youth program attendance and program events continue to be well received and attended by the Maroondah community. These figures are some of the highest for the region and demonstrates Council's continued investment in this service is reaping significant benefits and rewards for the community.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL NOTES THE EASTERN REGIONAL LIBRARIES CORPORATION REPORT JULY 2018 – SEPTEMBER 2018

 

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Outcomes of Maroondah Motions to the Municipal Association of Victoria State Council Meeting

Item 6

 

Purpose

To consider the outcomes of motions submitted by Council to the Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) State Council Meeting held on Friday 19 October 2018.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose in this report.

 

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs.

 

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

 

8.1       Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

The Municipal Association of Victoria is one of the local government sector peak body associations and together with local members of parliament, provides significant advocacy to both State and Federal Governments on behalf of Maroondah residents and ratepayers

 

The MAV State Council Annual Meeting was held on Friday 19 October 2018.

 

Council, at its meeting on 17 September 2018, resolved to submit the following motion:

 

Carparking Issue arising from Amendment VC148 as part of the Victorian Government’s Smart Planning Program

 

That the Municipal Association of Victoria calls upon the State Government to immediately make the application of the car parking rates specified in to the Victorian planning provisions, a voluntary inclusion by Councils rather than mandatory

Rationale:

 

Amendment VC148 introduced changes to the Victoria Planning Provisions (VPP) and all planning schemes on 31 July 2018 arising from the Victorian Government’s Smart Planning program. The program aim was to simplify and modernise Victoria’s planning policy and rules to make planning more efficient, accessible and transparent.

One of the more substantive changes arising from VC148 is the reduced car parking rates specified in the Victorian Planning Provisions at Clause 52.06 (Car parking). In particular, the introduction of significant car parking dispensations and reduced car parking rates for land uses and developments has been provided to automatically:

·        Reduce the car parking requirement for a new use in an existing building in the Commercial 1, Commercial 2 and Activity Centre Zones for up to 10 car parking spaces.

·        Reduce the car parking requirements for land identified within the Principal Public Transport Network Area as shown on the Principal Public Transport Network Area Maps (State Government of Victoria, 2018). This includes no visitor parking for developments that may be remote from train stations and regular multi-directional public transport, and only 3.5 cars to each 100m2 floor area for restaurants and convenience shops, regardless of patron and staff numbers.

The introduction of VC148 as a blanket reduction in the required amount of car parking fails to adequately recognise the enormous diversity of environments and activity centres across the State that are covered by the Principal Public Transport Network Area Maps, and the Commercial 1, Commercial 2 and Activity Centre Zones. For example, compare the myriad of access and transport opportunities of for those zones and areas in inner City Melbourne to those in the suburbs.  

The ability of these very different mapped locations to encourage alternate transport modes, public transport use, and cater for various rates of overflow car parking from private land therefore varies enormously across the State.

Moreover, the blanket planning control implemented by VC148 also fails to recognise that contemporary and best practice transport and car parking planning starts by first acknowledging that such strategies must be place based and not generic if they are to succeed, and in this regard Councils are best qualified to make these place making and changing decisions.

Issue / discussion

Due to a very similar motion put forward by Manningham City Council, the Council representatives from Maroondah and Manningham were willing to vote upon a consolidated motion rather than vote upon the two motions separately.

The consolidated motion, together, with the result of the deliberations of the State Council, is as follows:

Motion 37: Planning Provisions for Car Parking

 

Motion Carried (68% for and 32% against):

That the MAV advocate that the State Government review recent planning scheme amendments reducing car parking requirements within the Principal Public Transport Network Area, and restore to councils the discretion to vary parking requirements within their municipality

 

Financial / economic issues

Refer to rationale as highlighted under Background

Environmental / amenity issues

Refer to rationale as highlighted under Background

Social / community issues

Refer to rationale as highlighted under Background

Community consultation

Council, through various forums, consultations and strategies, has engaged the Maroondah community regarding these various issues.  This report further demonstrates Council’s preparedness to advocate to other spheres of government on behalf of Maroondah residents.

Conclusion

The three motions submitted by Maroondah indicates the willingness of Council to advocate in such forums on behalf of residents and ratepayers, in addition to demonstrating Council’s continued leadership on issues within the sector. 

 

 

Attachments

1.

MAV State Council Meeting 19 October 2018 - Outcomes

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT COUNCIL NOTES THE OUTCOMES OF THE MOTION SUBMITTED BY COUNCIL THAT WAS THE SUBJECT OF CONSIDERATION AND DEBATE AT THE MUNICIPAL ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA STATE COUNCIL MEETING HELD ON 19 OCTOBER 2018

  


DIRECTOR Operations, Assets & Leisure Adam Todorov

 

Maroondah Carols 2018

Item 1

 

PURPOSE

In order to facilitate the operations of the 2018 Maroondah Carols on Saturday 1 December, this report seeks formal Council endorsement to:

·        Advertise the Town Park precinct as a smoke free area on the above date; and

·        Prohibit dogs within the Town Park precinct on the above date.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A vibrant and culturally rich community

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be a creative cosmopolitan community recognised for its celebration and promotion of arts and culture.  There will be a broad range of engaging entertainment options, diverse cultural activities and the creation and display of traditional and contemporary forms of art.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

3.2     Provide a diverse range of engaging entertainment spaces, events and activities

3.3     Support festivals & events that celebrate local arts, diversity and produce.

Background

Smoke Free

 

Since 2013 Maroondah Festival has been a smoke free event after the community consultation in which 96% of participants in a survey responded positively to the ban. In 2014 Council extended this ban to the Maroondah Carols which was also received positively by the community.

 

Dog Free

 

The grand finale of the Maroondah Carols is a fireworks display. Unfortunately, many animals are terrified by fireworks displays, causing them to be distressed, upset and can indirectly pose risks to dog safety through damage of the ear canal, and by causing them to take flight to escape the loud noises, sometimes injuring themselves and others in the process.

 

Fireworks may also trigger an aggressive fear response in dogs putting the community around them at risk.

 

During fireworks, dogs should be kept indoors and in a comfortable hiding place to allow the dogs to feel safe.

 

Therefore, it is proposed that Council ban dogs from the 2018 Maroondah Carols. 

Issue / discussion

Smoke Free

 

It is proposed to promote the Maroondah Carols site as a smoke free event from 4.00pm to 10.00pm inclusive, on Saturday 1 December 2018.

 

Dog Free

 

It is proposed to ban dogs, with the exception of assistance dogs, at the Maroondah Carols site from 4.00pm to 10.00pm inclusive, on Saturday 1 December 2018.

 

To declare a defined area as 'dog free' Council may by resolution make an order under Part 26 - 2a of the Domestic Animals Act 1994 with the right to:

‘Prohibit the presence of dogs and cats in any public area of the municipal district of the Council.’

 

The Carols site includes the following areas:

·        Town Park including Athletics track; and

·        Fred Geale oval

The following process will be undertaken in order to ensure a safe Maroondah Carols and that the general public are aware that dogs are not to be brought to the event:

·        All promotion and marketing in the lead up to the 2018 Maroondah Carols will contain information indicating that it is a dog free event;

·        In the event that visitors bring their dogs to the 2018 event they will be handed a letter outlining the reasons behind the ban and asked to remove their dog from the site; and

·        If a dog is displaying a dangerous temperament and/or the owner refuses to follow the instruction, the owner will again be asked to remove the dog from the Carols site immediately and may be fined.

 

Two Officers nominated from Local Laws will be employed to patrol the Maroondah Carols between 4.00pm to 10.00pm on Saturday 1 December 2018 ensuring dogs are removed immediately by the owners.

Financial / economic issues

Financial implications of these two measures are minimal and will be met within budget.


Environmental / amenity issues

Maroondah Carols is promoted as a family celebration with expectations that over 6,000 people will attend the event.  Maintaining a safe environment for visitors is of paramount importance and actions such as the promotion of a smoke free and dog free event is a significant contributor to this end.

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

‘No Smoking’ and ‘No Dogs’ information will be included in Maroondah Carols advertising material.

Conclusion

The dog and smoke free areas are crucial to ensuring the safe conduct of the 2018 Maroondah Carols.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

That COuncil

1.       APPROVES THE PROHIBITION of SMOKING DURING THE MAROONDAH CAROLS ON SATURDAY 1 DECEMBER 2018 BETWEEN 4.00PM AND 10.00 PM

2.       APPROVES THE PROHIBITION OF DOGS DURING THE MAROONDAH CAROLS ON SATURDAY 1 DECEMBER 2018 BETWEEN 4.00PM AND 10.00PM EXCEPT IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS:

i.        NORTON ROAD (FROM MT DANDENONG ROAD TO LEIGH ROAD)

ii.       CIVIC SQUARE

3.       PROMOTES INFORMATION REGARDING a SMOKE FREE EVENT AND the prohibition of DOGs ON ALL MAROONDAH CAROLS MARKETING MATERIAL PRIOR TO THE EVENT

  


Acting DIRECTOR Strategy & Community chris zidak

 

Ringwood East Shopping Centre - Declaration of Special Rate Scheme

Item 1

 

Purpose

To report on the public exhibition period and formally declare a Special Rate Scheme to develop, encourage and promote business within the Ringwood East Shopping Centre.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area: A prosperous and learning community

Our Vision:

In 2040, Maroondah will be a thriving centre of economic activity and opportunity within the eastern region where the sustainability and growth of local businesses is supported. All community members, groups, education providers and local businesses will have access to a wide range of quality learning resources and facilities.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

2.7     Embrace a place-based approach to the development and revitalisation of neighbourhood centres that provide opportunities for local business and places for social connection and interaction.

2.14   Facilitate the enhancement and revitalisation of industrial and commercial precincts that maximise investment, promote diverse job opportunities and provide for value adding industries.

Priority Action 2018-2019:

Not Applicable

Background

Council received a petition from the Ringwood East Traders Association (RETA) on 16 March 2018, requesting that Council support the introduction of a new scheme.  The previous Special Rate Scheme for the Ringwood East Shopping Centre ended in 2012. 

 

It was proposed that the Special Rate Scheme be in place for five years and that the funds generated through this scheme would be primarily utilised for promotional events, advertising, security (including CCTV maintenance), the employment of a part-time Shopping Centre Co-ordinator and activities which aim to increase commerce, patronage, safety, visual appeal and vitality of the Centre. These services will only provide a ‘special benefit’ to the owners and the occupiers of the land and the commercial and business properties located in the Scheme area.

 

 

 

For this reason, it is proposed that the whole of the Special Rate would be levied against the retail, commercial and professional business properties located in the Scheme area.  It is considered that there are no other special benefits or community benefits arising from the proposed Special Rate Scheme.

 

The management of the funds generated by the proposed scheme is to be undertaken by the Committee of the RETA in accordance with a signed agreement with Council. The Special Rate Scheme will be levied on all rateable commercial properties in the designated area as indicated on the Plan (Attachment 1) and defined in the Recommendation.  The scheme will apply to 72 properties, be in place for five years and would raise $24,820.97 p.a.  A listing of the properties that are proposed to be included in the Scheme forms a part of the declaration and is contained in Attachment 2.

 

At the Council meeting held 21 May 2018, Council proposed to declare a Special Rate Scheme for the Ringwood East Shopping Centre and commenced public exhibition of the Scheme.  As required by the Local Government Act (‘the Act’), Council notified in writing all owners and occupiers of businesses within the specified area, and called for written submissions.  A public notice was also placed in the ‘Maroondah Leader’.

 

A summary of the issues raised in the submissions received, is contained within this report.  Submissions are also attached (Attachment 3).

 

Issue / discussion

In accordance with the provisions of Section 163(A) of the Act, a person may make a submission under Section 223 relating to a special rate and/or charge.

 

Following Council’s decision at the 21 May Council meeting to place the scheme on public exhibition, all affected owners and operators were informed of Council’s decision in writing, a public notice was placed and the opportunity to appear before a Committee of Council was provided. In accordance with the Local Government Act, a proposed scheme cannot proceed if a majority of objections are received following the public exhibition period.  The public exhibition process ceased on 13 July 2018.

 

The following is a summary of outcomes derived from the public exhibition process:

·        22 submissions were received. 

·        The submissions included 21 objections to the proposed scheme and 1 which was provided in support (on behalf of the RETA).

·        Of the total submissions that were an objection to the proposed scheme, 16 were provided on a generic pro-forma.

·        5 written objections were more detailed. 

·        All submitters were also provided with the opportunity to appear before a Committee of Council to further articulate their submission - all submitters declined this opportunity.

 

As an overview, the consultation process highlighted that 29% of contributors were opposed to the proposed scheme.  As a summary, objectors indicated the following reasons why they did not support the proposed scheme: perceived failure of the previous scheme (which ceased in 2012), lack of special benefit for their business, how the funds may be spent and the inability for benefits to be quantified for all contributors.

 

The following provides additional detail from submissions and key recommendations:

 

Non Retail Business Operation

 

Issue

 

Some submitters indicated that their business was a ‘non-retail’ entity or service-based business.  These businesses did not rely on passing trade, and therefore indicated that they did not significantly benefit from promotion and marketing activities which aim to attract more patrons to the Centre. 

 

Officer Response

 

Special Rate and Charge Schemes are a levy on rateable properties, not the use for which that property is being utilised.  Irrespective of tenancy, the levy relates to individual properties and the ultimate contributor will depend on lease arrangements. To reduce or exempt the contribution from a business, on the basis of the current tenancy, would be contrary to the basic principles of scheme development. 

 

Recommendation

 

There is scope, in some instances. to nominate a differential charge contribution based on the physical location of a business and the level of special benefit which may accrue to a tenant based on their positioning within a centre. As this scheme does not have a charge component, there is not the opportunity to differentiate contributors based on their location.

 

Variation - part Commercial operation

 

Issue

 

One submitter indicated that their business operation only encompassed a portion of the rateable property and therefore they should not be responsible for the full burden of the rate as it applied to the total CIV of the property.

 

Officer Response

 

Officers from the Business & Activity Centre Development team have liaised with colleagues from the Revenue & Property team and have been instructed that unless the property owner requests for the property to be re-valued as separate tenancies, the property will remain as one rateable property and lease arrangements will determine how the scheme is apportioned. Verbal discussions with the property owner have confirmed that this apportionment will be undertaken without any need for title changes.

 

 

Recommendation

 

No action required.

 

CCTV Funding

 

Issue

 

Some submitters expressed concern about the initial funding of the CCTV system and how this was and will continue to be funded.

 

Officer Response

 

The Ringwood East Shopping Centre CCTV system was funded by the ‘Safer Streets Programme’.  Application was made by Council, on behalf of the trading precinct, to purchase and install 7 cameras.  The ownership and ongoing maintenance of the system is vested with the RETA.

 

Recommendation

 

In response to concerns raised within submissions, the RETA will be encouraged to circulate information relating to how the system was funded, camera locations, location of the central recording device and the processes and protocols to both protect and access footage.

 

 

Economic Impacts

 

Issue

 

Some submitters indicated that they viewed scheme payments as a further impost on their business, with no positive reflection in their trading position. Preference for some operators to undertake their own marketing, rather than participate in Centre-wide initiatives, was also expressed. 

 

Officer Response

 

It is determined that all properties listed in the attached schedule will receive a special benefit through the implementation of this scheme.  Improved promotion and marketing and the creation of a more vibrant centre, will lead to increased patronage of the centre and increased demand for businesses to locate in the centre. 

 

It is recognised that businesses within the centre will undertake their own marketing effort and that additional benefits will accrue to the businesses within the centre, both individually and collectively, via a co-ordinated marketing campaign.

 


 

Recommendation

 

Discussions will be held with RETA to convey the concerns identified and reiterate the need for ongoing engagement with contributors and further refinement of targeted marketing activities which benefit all businesses.  This will include identifying quantifiable benefits and impacts of key events and promotional initiatives.

 

Activities of RETA

 

Issue

 

Some submitters raised concern about the activities of the Traders Association.  This included: the types of promotions undertaken in the past, the breadth of promotional activities and the inference that in the past they have benefited specific businesses, how the achievements or benefits of projects and activities were recorded and conveyed, and the level of interaction with all traders about current and future activities.  Some submitters also questioned the validity of the RETA as an incorporated body.

 

Officer Response

 

All activities conducted by RETA will be undertaken in accordance with an Agreement between the Association and Council.  This Agreement outlines the key areas of expenditure, auditing and reporting requirements.  There is scope to refine and improve this Agreement to ensure greater consultation and reporting of RETA activities.  Within the scope of the Agreement, there is the opportunity for all traders to have strong input into the activities of the RETA and therefore determine collectively how scheme funds should be best allocated.

 

The RETA, over the past decade, has experienced both operational and dormant phases.  Recent discussions with Consumer Affairs has confirmed that the Association has complied with all requirements to reinstate the Association.  

 

Recommendation

 

Discussions will be held with RETA to convey the concerns of some businesses and reiterate the need for ongoing consultation, engagement and involvement with contributors.  Additional emphasis will be given within the Agreement between Council and RETA to ensure more extensive reporting of outcomes from all initiatives and projects with an emphasis on developing, quantifying and improving all funded activities.

 

 

Instigation of Scheme Renewal

 

Issue

 

Some submitters queried how the scheme process was instigated and the role of Council.  Concern was also raised about the need for an additional rate, given that all operators or owners already incur Council Rates for their property. 

 


 

Officer Response

 

The request to instigate proceedings to commence a new scheme was made by the representative trader body - RETA. This process involved strong consultation with all business operators over an extensive period of time.  Section 163 of The Local Government Act gives Council the authority to commence proceedings and administer a scheme on behalf of RETA (an incorporated body) where it is determined that there is or will be a special benefit to those persons required to pay the Special Rate.  Scheme funds are not expended by Council and are very different in application compared to general rates.  Council administers the scheme and then, in accordance with an Agreement with an incorporated Traders Association, provides all collected funds to the Association.

 

Recommendation

 

Discussions will be held with RETA to convey the concerns of some businesses and reiterate the need for ongoing consultation, engagement and involvement with contributors in relation to how scheme funds are utilised and the benefits which accrue to precinct businesses.

 

The following provides an overview of the favourable submission received during the public exhibition period:

·        A strong RETA will be able to act as a unified ‘voice’ for the Centre and potentially attract additional funding from Council, and other sources, to beautify, identify and improve the Centre.

·        The centre has been able to attract considerable funding, particularly with respect to CCTV, which has enhanced the safety of patrons. The scheme will allow a sound maintenance regime to be implemented.

·        Scheme funds will enable traders to unite and promote the Centre - utilising digital, event-based activities and broad promotion to the surrounding community.

·        Access to joint funds will enable opportunities for the development of business skills through networking events and training.

All written submissions have been considered and it is recommended that no individual property exemptions be made to the proposed scheme.   It is proposed that objections received do not constitute a majority and the nature of objections articulated by submitters do not represent grounds which would warrant a variation or retraction of the proposed scheme.

Financial / economic issues

The RETA determined that the proposed scheme should be levied based on a proportional rate relating to the capital improved value (CIV) of individual properties (with the intention of raising $25,000 p.a).  The CIV of rateable properties was taken as at the most recent valuation (August 2016).  Since this time there has been a minor variation to one of the rateable properties and this has been reflected in a minor reduction in the total funds to be levied. The proposed scheme will therefore raise $24,820.97 p.a.

 

 

The calculation of the Special Rate includes:

·        A rate per contributor based on .000873209 cents in the dollar, of the CIV of the rated property.

The first instalment of the Special Rate is due and payable one month from the date of the final Council resolution or, if an appeal is lodged, one month after the Tribunal decision is handed down.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

The application of a Special Rate for the specified area will be of special benefit for those persons required to pay the levy, as it is anticipated that improved promotion and marketing and the creation of a more vibrant and safe shopping centre will lead to increased patronage of the Centre.

Community consultation

The RETA undertook significant consultation with all business operators within the Ringwood East Shopping Centre throughout the early petition phase.  This initial consultation, whilst not a requirement of the Local Government Act, is a requirement of Council’s ‘Promotional Special Rate and/or Charge Scheme Policy’ and is recognised as best practice when proposing a new scheme.

 

All businesses were hand-delivered individual ‘petitions’ outlining the proposal for a new scheme and the opportunity to express support, objection or indifference to a proposed scheme.  The initial correspondence was followed by visits from representatives of the RETA to businesses that had not expressed a definite view. 

 

Following the extensive initial community consultation, individual petitions from 43 businesses (of a total of 72) were received from the RETA, in support of the proposed scheme.  In addition to the support demonstrated by this petition, the following is a summary of the information gathered throughout the initial consultation phase:

·        43 businesses demonstrated their support for the proposed scheme indicated by signing individual petitions.

·        15 businesses expressed that they did not support the renewal of the scheme (this information was expressed both in writing and verbally).

·        Petitions from 14 properties were not received as the properties were either vacant, the tenants of the properties were unable to be contacted or the tenants were ambivalent with regard to the outcome of the proposed Scheme.

 

The initial consultation represented a significant positive response and provided a strong platform for Council to proceed to the next step in the process and consider submissions following a public exhibition period of the proposed scheme.

 

The public exhibition period resulted in twenty-two written submissions, consisting of twenty-one submissions against the proposed scheme and one in favour (representing 29% objection).  In accordance with the Act, all submitters were then invited to provide a verbal submission before a Committee of Council - all submitters declined this opportunity.  The very nature of the public exhibition process therefore indicates that 71% of potential contributors were either in support of the proposed scheme, or were not significantly aggrieved to object throughout this process. A full overview of the public exhibition outcome/s is provided in the ‘Issue/Discussion’ element of this report.

 

If after consideration the decision is made to proceed, and the Scheme is declared and levied, those liable for payment have the opportunity of further appeal to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal.

 

This must be done within one (1) month of the date of issue of a Council levy notice.

 

Information outlining Council’s declaration of the scheme, the manner of payment, how an appeal can be made, and the grounds for appeal, will be attached to the Council levy notice.

Conclusion

Extensive consultation has been undertaken as part of the process for initiating the Ringwood East Shopping Centre Special Rate Scheme.  Consideration of all submissions has been undertaken and no changes to the proposed scheme are recommended.

 

It is determined that the Ringwood East Shopping Centre Special Rate Scheme is a positive initiative which will enable businesses within the Centre to promote the unique qualities of the precinct and collectively enhance the viability of the Centre.  It is further considered that all rateable properties within the designated area will derive a special benefit from the expenditure of Special Rate Scheme funds.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Special Rates Scheme - Ringwood East - Attachment No. 1 - Explanatory Map to Part 3 iv "The Area"

2.

Special Rates Scheme - Ringwood East - Attachment No. 2 - Explanatory Schedule to Part 3

3.

Special Rate Scheme - Ringwood East - Attachment 3:  Public Exhibition submissions

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 


 

RECOMMENDATION

That

1.       council notes the submissions received following exhibition of the proposed RINGWOOD EAST SHOPPING CENTRE SPECIAL rate scheme

2.       council having undertaken the necessary statutory procedures, and considering all written submissions, DECLARES A SPECIAL RATE SCHEME FOR THE RINGWOOD EAST SHOPPING CENTRE

3.       the following special rate be declared:

i.        A SPECIAL RATE IS DECLARED FOR THE PERIOD COMMENCING ON THE DAY WHICH COUNCIL ISSUES A NOTICE LEVYING PAYMENT OF THE SPECIAL RATE AND CONCLUDING ON THE FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF THAT DAY.

ii.       THE SPECIAL RATE IS DECLARED FOR THE PURPOSE OF DEFRAYING ANY EXPENSES IN RELATION TO THE PROMOTION, ADVERTISING, MARKETING AND DEVELOPMENT OF BUSINESSES WITHIN THE RINGWOOD EAST SHOPPING CENTRE WHicH PROJECT:

-      COUNCIL CONSIDERS THERE IS OR WILL BE A SPECIAL BENEFIT TO THOSE PERSONS REQUIRED TO PAY THE SPECIAL RaTE (AND WHO ARE DESCRIBED IN SUCCEEDING PARTS OF THIS RESOLUTION)

-      ARISES OUT OF COUNCIL’S FUNCTION OF PLANNING FOR AND PROVIDING SERVICES AND FACILITIES FOR THE LOCAL COMMUNITY AND THE ENCOURAGEMENT OF COMMERCE

iii.      THE TOTAL

-      COST OF PERFORMING THE FUNCTION DESCRIBED IN PART ii OF THIS RESOLUTION BE RECORDED AS $124,104.85  (over a 5 year period) AND

-      AMOUNT FOR THE SPECIAL RATE TO BE LEVIED BE RECORDED AS $124,104.85  OR SUCH OTHER AMOUNT AS IS LAWFULLY LEVIED AS A CONSEQUENCE OF THIS RESOLUTION

iv.      THE FOLLOWING BE SPECIFIED AS THE AREA FOR WHICH THE SPECIAL RATE IS SO DECLARED:

                   THE AREA WITHIN MUNICIPAL DISTRICT OF COUNCIL HIGHLIGHTED IN     THE PLAN ATTACHED TO THIS RESOLUTION (“THE AREA”)

 

 

 

v.       THE FOLLOWING BE SPECIFIED AS THE LAND IN RELATION TO WHICH THE SPECIAL RATE SO DECLARED:

                   ALL LAND WITHIN THE AREA PRIMARILY USED OR ADAPTED OR      DESIGNED TO BE USED FOR COMMERCIAL PURPOSES

 

vi.      THE FOLLOWING BE SPECIFIED AS THE CRITERIA WHICH FORM THE BASIS OF THE SPECIAL RATE SO DECLARED:

                   OWNERSHIP OF ANY LAND DESCRIBED IN PART 3iv OF THIS     RESOLUTION

 

vii.     THE FOLLOWING BE SPECIFIED AS THE MANNER IN WHICH THE SPECIAL RATE SO DECLARED WILL BE ASSESSED AND LEVIED:

-      A SPECIAL RATE PER PROPERTY BASED ON .000873209 CENTS IN THE DOLLAR OF THE CAPITAL IMPROVED VALUE OF THE RATED PROPERTY

viii.    HAVING REGARD TO THE PRECEEDING PARTS OF THIS RESOLUTION BUT SUBJECT TO SECTION 166(1) OF THE ACT, IT BE RECORDED THAT THE OWNERS OF THE LAND DESCRIBED IN PART 3IV OF THIS RESOLUTION WILL PAY THE SPECIAL RATE IN THE AMOUNTS SET OUT IN THE TABLE ATTACHED TO THIS RESOLUTION IN THE FOLLOWING MANNER:

PAYMENT ANNUALLY BY A LUMP SUM ON OR BEFORE

-      ONE MONTH FOLLOWING THE ISSUE BY COUNCIL OF A NOTICE LEVYING PAYMENT UNDER s 163(4) OF THE ACT OR

-      ONE MONTH AFTER THE DATE OF ANY DETERMINATION BY THE VICTORIAN CIVIL AND ADMINISTRATIVE APPEALS TRIBUNAL FOLLOWING THE HEARING OF ANY APPLICATION FOR REVIEW UNDER SECTION 185 OF THE ACT

WHICHEVER DAY LAST OCCURS OR

PAYMENT BY FOUR INSTALLMENTS TO BE PAID BY THE DATES WHICH ARE FIXED BY THE COUNCIL IN THE NOTICE LEVYING PAYMENT UNDER S 163(4) OF THE ACT.

ix.      COUNCIL WILL, SUBJECT TO THE ACT, REQUIrE A PERSON TO PAY INTEREST ON ANY SPECIAL RATE WHICH THAT PERSON IS LIABLE TO PAY AND HAS NOT BEEN PAID BY THE DATE SPECIFIED FOR ITS PAyMENT.

x.       COUNCIL CONSIDERS THAT THERE WILL BE A SPECIAL BENEFIT TO THE PERSONS REQUIRED TO PAY THE SPECIAL RATE BECAUSE THERE WILL BE A BENEFIT TO THOSE PERSONS THAT IS OVER AND ABOVE, OR GREATER THAN, THE BENEFIT THAT IS AVAILABLE TO PERSONS WHO ARE NOT SUBJECT TO THE PROPOSED SPECIAL RATE, DIRECTLY AND INDIRECTLY, as a result of the expenditure proposed by the special rate, in that the:

-        viability of the precinct as a business, commercial,   retail and professional area; and

-        value and use, occupation and enjoyment of the         properties included in the scheme,

will be maintained and enhanced through increased economic activity.

xi.      COUNCIL FURTHER CONSIDERS, AND FORMALLY DETERMINES FOR THE PURPOSES OF SECTIONS 163(2)(A), (2A) AND (2B) OF THE ACT, THAT THE ESTIMATED PROPORTION OF THE TOTAL BENEFITS OF THE SCHEME TO WHICH THE PERFORMANCE OF THE FUNCTION OR THE EXERCISE OF THE POWER RELATES (INCLUDING ALL SPECIAL BENEFITS AND COMMUNITY BENEFITS) THAT WILL ACCRUE AS SPECIAL BENEFITS TO ALL OF THE PERSONS WHO ARE LIABLE TO PAY THE SPECIAL rate IS IN A RATIO OF 1:1 (OR 100%). THIS IS ON THE BASIS THAT, IN THE OPINION OF COUNCIL, THE COMMUNITY BENEFIT IS NIL BECAUSE EXPENDITURE OF THE SPECIAL RATE IS MARKETING, PROMOTION, ADVERTISING AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT RELATED AND WILL ACCORDINGLY ONLY BENEFIT THE OWNERS AND OCCUPIERS OF THOSE PROPERTIES INCLUDED IN THE SCHEME THAT ARE PRIMARILY USED, ADAPTED OR DESIGNED TO BE USED FOR COMMERCIAL PURPOSES

xii.     THE SPECIAL RATE SO DECLARED WILL REQUIRE THE PREPARATION OF A FUNDING agreement BETWEEN COUNCIL AND THE RINGWOOD EAST TRADERS ASSOCIATION TO FORMALISE THE ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS OF THE SPECIAL RATE, SUCH AGREEMENT BEING TO ENSURE THAT AT ALL TIMES, AND AS A PRECONDITION TO THE PAYMENT OF ANY FUNDS BY COUNCIL TO THE TRADERS’ ASSOCIATION, COUNCIL IS, AND REMAINS, LEGALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR APPROVING, DIRECTING AND CONTROLLING THE EXPENDITURE OF THE PROCEEDS OF THE SPECIAL rate IN ACCORDANCE WITH ITS OBLIGATIONS UNDER THE ACT TO DO SO

4.       council writes to all submitters informing them of council’s decision

5.       council authorises the chief executive officer to levy the special rate in accordance with section 163(4) of the local governmeNT act 1989

 

 


acting DIRECTOR Strategy & Community chris zidak

 

Formal Consideration of Annual Report 2017/18 and Our Achievements document

Item 2

 

Purpose

To formally consider the Annual Report 2017/18 pursuant to the Local Government Act 1989 and associated regulations and note the Our Achievements summary document.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered. Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparency and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1 Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

8.2 Ensure responsible and sustainable management of Maroondah’s resources, assets, infrastructure and natural environment

Priority Action 2018-2019:

Not applicable

Background

Under Section 131 of the Local Government Act 1989 (the Act), Council is required to prepare and submit an Annual Report to the Minister for Local Government within three months of the end of each financial year. The 2017/18 Annual report was submitted to the Minister on 30 September 2018.

 

Section 134 of the Act also requires Council to hold a meeting to consider the report within one month of submission to the Minister. This meeting is required to be an open meeting and at least 14 days’ notice must be given. Such notice was given in The Age newspaper on 19 September 2018.

Issue / discussion

Council endorsed the Annual Report 2017/18 for submission to the Minister at its meeting held on 17 September 2018 and a copy of the report was subsequently forwarded to the Minister for Local Government on 30 September 2018.

 

The necessary statutory advertising has been undertaken and copies of the report have been made available from Council Service Centres and Council’s website.

 

 

Key features of the Annual Report as required by section 131 of the Act include the following:

·        A report of Council’s operations during the financial year

·        Audited financial statements for the financial year

·        Performance Statement prepared under Section 132

·        Report on the Performance Statement prepared under Section 133

·        Inclusion of Council results relating to the Local Government Performance Reporting Framework for 2017/18

The report demonstrates Council’s ongoing commitment to the Maroondah community and highlights a range of achievements. During 2017/18, Council:

·        Completed the design and commenced construction of the $16.5m HE Parker Multi Sport Complex

·        Opened the all abilities playground at Ringwood Lake Park

·        Adopted a Climate and Risk Adaption Strategy 2018-2022

·        Prepared an Affordable and Social Housing Policy

·        Upgraded the Croydon Maternal and Child Health Centre

·        Adopted a Gender Equity Policy

·        Launched Council’s new website

·        Advocated for the removal of the level crossing at Coolstore Road in Croydon

·        Implemented additional female changing facilities at local sporting venues

·        Commenced transitioning services in response to the National Disability Insurance scheme and My Aged Care reforms

·        Commenced the construction of the new Croydon Town Square

·        Worked in partnership to update the structure plan for the Ringwood Metropolitan Activity Centre

A summary of Council’s achievements within the Annual Report 2017/18 can be found in the attached Our Achievements 2017/18.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

 

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Pursuant to Section 131 of the Act:

·        Following the submission of the Annual report to the Minister, Council must give public notice that the Annual Report has been prepared and can be inspected at Council Offices

·        Section 134 of the Act also requires Council to hold a meeting to consider the report within one month of submission to the Minister. This meeting is required to be an open meeting and at least 14 days’ notice of the meeting must be given.

In accordance with the provisions of the Act, such public notice was published in The Age newspaper on 19 September 2018.

 

Copies of the endorsed Annual Report were also made available for inspection at the Council Service Centres and Council’s website.

Conclusion

The Annual Report 2017/18 confirms that Council has made significant advances towards achieving the community aspirations relating to community service delivery, environmental enhancement, economic development, infrastructure development and civic administration and leadership, in addition to its statutory requirements under section 131 of the Act.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Maroondah City Council Annual Report 2017/18

2.

Our Achievements 2017/18 Financial Year

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATIONs

 

That Council

1.       formally endorses the maroondah city council annual report 2017/18

2.       notes that the relevant statutory requirements have been met

3.       notes the summary document - Our Achievements 2017/18

 


acting DIRECTOR Strategy & Community chris zidak

 

Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018/19) - Quarter 1 progress report

Item 3

 

Purpose

To provide an update on the progress made towards implementation of Year 2 priority actions identified in the Council Plan 2017-2021, as at the end of September 2018.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our future together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

Our Vision:  In the year 2040, Maroondah will be an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered. Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1 Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

8.2 Ensure responsible and sustainable management of Maroondah’s resources, assets, infrastructure and natural environment

8.4 Foster a Council culture of innovation, cooperation, commitment, communication and continuous improvement that positions Maroondah as a leader in local government

Priority Action 2018-2019:

Not Applicable

Background

The Council Plan 2017-2021 is Maroondah City Council’s key medium term strategic document that sets key directions and priority actions to work towards the long-term community vision outlined in Maroondah 2040: Our future together.

 

The Council Plan plays a vital role in shaping Maroondah’s future over a four year period. It identifies both challenges and opportunities for our community at local and regional level within the context of the community’s long-term community vision, Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together. It also forms the basis for Council to make decisions regarding resources and priorities in response to community needs and aspirations.

 

The Council Plan is implemented through a service delivery planning process, and outcomes are measured and reported regularly. Achievements are reported back to Council and the community through the Maroondah City Council Annual Report at the end of each financial year.

 

Issue / discussion

Within the Council Plan, there are a range of priority actions identified that work towards delivery of the Maroondah 2040 Community Vision. These actions are updated annually to ensure the Plan continues to be aligned with Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together, the community’s long-term vision, and is responsive to community needs and expectations.

 

The Council Plan is divided into eight future community outcome areas, each with a set of four-year key directions (strategies), four-year priority actions, strategic indicators and supporting strategies and plans. The priority actions identified work towards the achievement of the key directions, and ultimately toward the outcomes and visions outlined in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together.

 

The attached report identifies the progress made by Council in delivering the 2018/19 priority actions identified in the Council Plan 2017-2021.

 

As at 30 September 2018, there was 1 action complete, 37 in progress, 1 deferred until 2019/20 (similar work to this action is being undertaken in 2018/19), and 1 not started (planned to commence in 2019).

 

Quarterly reports on priority action progress will be provided to Council throughout the financial year. At the end of this financial year, a final progress report on Council’s achievements relating to these Council Plan priority actions will be included in the Annual Report 2018/19.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

The attached report identifies that Council is making excellent progress in working toward the delivery of the 2018/19 priority actions identified in the Council Plan 2017-2021.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2) Quarter 1 Progress Report

 

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That council notes the progress made towards the delivery of the counCil plan 2018/19 priority actions

  


DIRECTOR Development & Amenity Andrew Fuaux

 

Maroondah Public Lighting Policy

Item 1

 

Purpose

The purpose of this report is to present the Maroondah Public Lighting Policy to Council for consideration and to seek endorsement to place the Policy and the supporting documents on public exhibition.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A safe, healthy and active community.

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be a safe, healthy and active community with local opportunities provided for people of all ages and abilities to have high levels of social, emotional and physical wellbeing.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

1.2     Work in partnership to address community safety issues, with a focus on activity centres, public spaces, roads and public transport.

Outcome Area:  A clean, green and sustainable community.

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be a green leafy community with high levels of waste diversion and sustainable approaches to infrastructure development, urban design and management of natural resources.  Our community will be resilient and have the knowledge, capacity and resources to make sustainable lifestyle choices.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

4.11   Strive to become a carbon neutral Council by implementing energy efficient initiatives and embracing clean energy solutions.

Outcome Area:  An accessible and connected community.

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an accessible community for all ages and abilities with walkable neighbourhoods, effective on and off-road transport networks, and access to a range of sustainable transport options.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

5.2     Work in partnership to provide improved accessibility and safety for transport users across all modes.

5.4     Work in partnership to provide a safe and efficient integrated transport network that enhances liveability, encourages a shift in travel modes and promotes Maroondah as a 20 minute city.

5.6     Advocate for and encourage the use of sustainable transport by enhancing local access to public transport, supporting behaviour change initiatives and enhancing the pedestrian and cycling network, including the provision of on-road bicycle lanes.

5.9     Promote streetscapes that encourage social interaction, physical activity and connection to the natural environment.

5.10   Work in partnership to improve walkability within and between neighbourhoods and activity centres through effective urban design, open space planning, wayfinding signage, improved public lighting and accessible infrastructure.

5.11   Enhance and promote Maroondah’s walking and cycling shared path network ensuring connecting with the wider Metropolitan Melbourne tail network.

Outcome Area:  An attractive, thriving and well built community.

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an attractive community with high quality residential and commercial areas incorporating infrastructure that meets the needs and aspirations of all ages and abilities.  A diverse range of housing options will be available and thriving activity centres will provide a broad range of facilities and services that meet community needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

6.4     Facilitate, lead and educate the community in the use of environmentally sustainable design across all forms of infrastructure to limit carbon emissions and reduce resource consumption.

As noted above, the Maroondah Public Lighting Policy overlaps a number of themes within the Maroondah 2040 framework and in some cases can be linked back to a number of directions within those themes.

Background

The Maroondah Public Lighting Policy provides guidance on the design, installation and management of public lighting within the City of Maroondah.

 

The development of Public Lighting Policy was identified within the following Council strategies and plans:

·        Maroondah Carbon Neutral Strategy and Action Plan 2014/15-2020/21

·        Maroondah Sustainability Strategy 2016-2020

·        Maroondah Physical Activity Strategy 2015-2020

 

In order to assist with the development of a Public Lighting Policy, Council officers engaged Ironbark Sustainability to develop a Public Lighting Position Paper and Public Lighting Guidelines.

 

The Public Lighting Position Paper determines the position on lighting technical matters whilst the Public Lighting Guidelines determine the requirements for specific lighting elements such as poles, lamps and timers.

 

The Public Lighting Policy will apply to lighting for Council managed roads, Council Reserves, Council car parks and adjacent to Council buildings.  The Policy will not apply to internal building lighting, sports ground lighting and sports facility lighting.

 

The Council Action Plan has developed a number of actions to assist Council officers to implement the policy positions contained within the policy and focus on operation, maintenance and asset renewal of existing lighting applications and capital works associated with new public lighting infrastructure.

Issue / discussion

Public lighting plays an important role in the safety and amenity of the community and helps to make public spaces more useable and enjoyable for all.  By providing public lighting Council can reduce the risk of accidents and injuries and the hours that the community activities can be extended.

 

Lighting of roads plays an important part in the function of the road at night and other times during the day when visibility is low.  In the past, a general approach was applied to lighting where lighting was typically provided on every second power pole on roads in urban areas, which was consistent with lighting schemes adopted by most councils at the time.  Whilst for reserves and car parks, lighting was typically applied in response to requests from the community or user groups, which lead to a non-uniform approach to lighting with significant variations between sites.

 

Public lighting on roads, and within some reserves and car parks, is typically unmetered, where it is operated and maintained by the distribution service provider, which for Council is AusNet Services, with Council paying a tariff for operation costs.  A recent shift within the industry has seen distribution service providers shifting public lighting from the unmetered network grid onto metered supplies, transferring the ownership of the lighting to councils and with it on-going operation and maintenance responsibilities.

 

The transfer of non-road public lighting to metered supplies presents opportunities for Council to be more flexible and innovative with new lighting schemes, where Council can implement lighting controls, such as timers or dimming, to reduce running costs and greenhouse gas emissions.

 

The presence of public lighting can have a high influence in facilitating transportation mode shift and can assist in encouraging community members to change their travel behaviour, such that, cycling and walking (including to public transport) become regular forms of travel.

 

In addition, there are public health and social benefits that can be derived through increased participation in physical activity and that, similar to transportation mode shift, the presence of public lighting can have a high influence in encouraging participation in physical activity in the outdoor realm.

 

Public lighting can also help Council achieve it’s goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2020, through the replacement of energy intensive incandescent lighting to more efficient lighting alternatives such as LED and fluorescent lighting. 

 

The Public Lighting Policy will provide direction for Council to implement best practice asset management for Council owned maintenance and repair procedures not only assist in providing a high level of service to the public but also contribute to extending the serviceable life of an asset, thus lowering the capital required for asset renewal projects over time.

 

The Public Lighting Policy recommends the adoption of 9 Policies which are listed below:

 

Policy 1 Council will engage a third-party designer to review plans proposed by developers for metered and unmetered lighting installations.

 

By reviewing lighting designs, future lighting installation would be implemented to appropriate standards using the most efficient street lighting layout as required under the lighting guidelines.

 

Policy 2 – Council will not stock decorative (non-standard) luminaires and poles for maintenance of unmetered public lighting.

 

Storage of decorative lighting elements impacts on Council’s Operations team due to the space requirements to store these items.  In addition, these items could remain in storage for lengthy periods of time where installations would occur outside of the warranty period.   As such, when a decorative light or pole is replaced by AusNet Services as a result of damage or failure, it will be replaced with an AusNet standard item and Council officers will liaise with AusNet for this to be changed to decorative lighting infrastructure.

 

Policy 3 – Council will undertake proactive maintenance of metered public lighting assets that includes visor cleaning and either annual operation audits or four-yearly condition assessments. 

 

Undertaking proactive maintenance ensures that public lighting continues to operate efficiently and allows the condition of the assets to be routinely monitored.

 

Policy 4 – Council will continue to replace unmetered mercury vapour street lights with more efficient LED street lights.  Council will proactively explore additional renewal opportunities to achieve environmental benefits and cost savings and will consider options for the replacement of non-standard unmetered street lighting with standard street lighting.

 

Replacing older street lights with LED street lights assist Council with its goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2020.

 

Policy 5 – The use of solar lighting will be permitted only where grid connecting lighting is not considered viable.

 

Solar lighting typically has higher capital costs and maintenance / replacement costs due to the solar panels and batteries and would only be considered where the cost to install grid connected electricity is high.

 

Policy 6 – Characteristic data will be collected by Council for any new non-standard unmetered street lighting assets that are installed.  Characteristic data relating to existing non-standard unmetered street lighting will be collected opportunistically during bulk LED street upgrade works.

 

Collecting data for non-standard unmetered street lighting assets allows Council officers to review and monitor this lighting infrastructure and liaise with AusNet Services regarding replacement of these assets were and when required.

 

Policy 7 – Council will determine the locations and times of operations for metered public lighting assets, as well as the type of control that should be installed, such as dimmers, switches or sensors.

 

Using controls on metered public lighting assets reduces the lighting operating costs and energy consumption which helps Council achieve its target of becoming carbon neutral.  In addition, the use of controls helps to prevent undesirable activity in these areas at night.

 

Policy 8 – Council will require contractors tendering or quoting for public lighting works to demonstrate best-practice recycling and waste disposal standards.  Where relevant this will include the requirement for contactors to provide evidence of appropriate recycling or disposal of materials.

 

Encouraging a high level of recycling helps to reduce the amount of waste that is sent to landfill aids in carbon reduction and reduces costs and resource use which provides positive benefits to the environment.

 

Policy 9 – This policy and the accompanying Public Lighting Guidelines will be subject to review every three to five years.

 

Reviewing the Policy and supporting documents ensures that the documents are up to date with industry standards and best practice.

Financial / economic issues

Through the actions identified in the Public Lighting Policy, Council will continue the program of replacing old inefficient street lights with more energy efficient alternatives, which provides on-going savings to Council through reduced electricity costs for lighting. 

 

In addition, the use of lighting controls, such as dimming, switching and sensors, further reduces energy consumption and therefore the overall lighting operating costs by providing flexibility for lighting schemes to dim lighting levels at times when usage is low and switch off lighting when it is not required.

 

Improved asset management of Council owned public lighting will also result in efficiency gains and cost savings.

Environmental / amenity issues

The Maroondah Public Lighting Policy will assist Council to become carbon neutral through the continuation of the street light bulk replacement program where energy intensive street lights are replaced with more energy efficient lighting alternatives.  Additionally, the use of lighting controls on lighting schemes further reduces energy consumption by allowing lights to be dimmed or switched off when not required further reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

 

The presence of public lighting can have a high influence in facilitating transportation mode shift and can assist in encouraging community members to change their travel behaviour, such that, cycling and walking (including to public transport) become regular forms of travel, thereby reducing the community’s dependence on car based travel.  As more members of the community migrate to sustainable transport modes and the use of private car for transport reduces, there will be corresponding reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and congestion on roads within Maroondah.

Social / community issues

The presence of public lighting can have a high influence in encouraging participation in physical activity in the outdoor realm.  When lighting is provided on local residential streets and in parks and reserves, the community’s perceptions of safety within these areas at night are increased.  This can therefore lead the creation of vibrant and active public open space areas strengthening the community’s connections and having a positive influence on independent mobility within different demographics of the community.

 

The use of controls on lighting schemes can help to prevent undesirable activity in these areas at night, where lighting within parks and reserves can be switched off at night thereby discouraging the use of these areas.   Discouraging the use of these areas late at night can help to reduce vandalism to Council assets and reduce Council’s costs with regard to maintenance and repair where vandalism has occurred.

Community consultation

Commencing community consultation on the Maroondah Public Lighting Policy, including the supporting documents, will provide the community an opportunity to understand Council’s future direction for public lighting.   The Maroondah Public Lighting Policy and supporting documents will be placed on Council website and Council will formally call for submissions.

 

In addition, Council officers will also notify key community and industry groups that the Maroondah Lighting Policy has been made available on Council’s website for consultation and will specifically invite submissions.  The key groups that may be contacted include:

·        A night sky observers / amateur astronomers group

·        A leisure / bushwalking group

·        A bicycle user group

·        A community safety group

·        A natural environment group

·        Industry groups

·        An electrical distribution business

 

It is expected that generally the community will support the Maroondah Public Lighting Policy given that Council regularly receives request from members of the community to provide additional street lighting in residential streets and light paths within parks and reserves.

Conclusion

As stated in the report, the introduction of a Maroondah Lighting Policy will provide guidance on the design, installation and management of public lighting within the City of Maroondah. 

 

The policy will provide a framework with regard to lighting areas within the municipality which can lead to providing more transport options for members of the community as they travel within the municipality and support the use of local residential streets, parks and reserves for physical activity.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Maroondah Public Lighting Policy & Action Plan

2.

Maroondah Public Lighting Policy - Public Lighting Position Paper

3.

Maroondah Lighting Policy - Public Lighting Guidelines

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL

1.       CONSIDERS public lighting policy and the supporting documents, the public lighting position paper, Action plan and public lighting guidelines

2.       REsolves to commence public consultation on the policy and supporting documents, including VIA COUNCIL WEBSITE, SOCIAL MEDIA AND INVITING key interest groups TO MAKE A WRITTEN SUBMISSION.  And FURTHERMORE, ensure A COPY of these documents is ON PUBLIC EXHIBITION AT THE CITY OFFICES, BRAESIDE AVENUE RINGWOOD, CUSTOMER SERVICE CENTRES, and REALM

3.       considers the outcomes of the community consultation at a future meeting of council

4.       considers the endorsement of the maroondah public lighting policy and action plan at a future meeting of council

 


DIRECTOR Development & Amenity Andrew Fuaux

 

Petition - Heathmont Village Shopping Centre - Request for two 15 minute Parking Bays

Item 2

 

Purpose

The purpose of this report is for Council to receive a petition, containing 172 signatures, for the conversion of two 1P parking bays to two 15 minute parking bays outside 194 Canterbury Road, Heathmont, within the Heathmont Village Shopping Centre car park.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  An Accessible Community

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an accessible community for all ages and abilities with walkable neighbourhoods, effective on and off-road transport networks and access to a range of sustainable transport options.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

Work in partnership to provide improved accessibility and safety for transport users across all modes.

Background

Council received the petition on 8 October 2018.  The petition contained 172 signatures, for the conversion of two 1P 8:30am - 6pm Monday to Saturday parking bays to two 1/4 P 8:30am - 6pm Monday to Saturday parking bays outside 194 Canterbury Road, Heathmont, within the Heathmont Village Shopping Centre car park.

 

The prayer of the petition is as follows:

 

“We the undersigned residents of Heathmont and frequent visitors to the Heathmont Village Shopping Centre would like the use of 2 x ’15 minute’ parks to be created outside 194 Canterbury Road Heathmont. This will allow short term access to the western end of the car park.”

Issue / discussion

The location of the requested parking modification at 194 Canterbury Road, Heathmont (within the Heathmont Village Shopping Centre Car Park) is shown in Figure 1 and 2 below.

 

Figure 1 – Melways extract showing request location

 

 

Figure 2 – Frontage view of the proposed restrictions

 

The proposed 15 minute parking spaces as per Figure 2 is located along the frontage of a florist and café.  Both these land uses generate short term trips for instance patrons picking up flowers/giftware and customers/Uber drivers picking up a coffee/takeaway order;

 

The existing parking restrictions along this southern section of the car park is shown in Figure 3.

 

Figure 3 – Aerial photograph of existing parking restrictions

Noting there are only two short term car spaces within this area of the car park (30 minute parking) on the north-eastern side, Council Officers consider the conversion of two 1P parking bays to 15 minute parking bays on the south-western side to be warranted.

Short term parking provides parking opportunities for shorter trips (i.e. food/beverage pickup, deliveries etc), and adds value to commercial precincts.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Shop traders that generate parking demands greater than 15 minutes may object to the conversion of 1 hour parking to 15 minute parking.

 

Shop customers that require parking longer than 15 minutes may object to the conversion of 1 hour parking to 15 minute parking.

 

 

Community consultation

Council Engineers will notify Heathmont Village Shopping Centre traders of the proposed parking modifications.

 

Shop traders will be informed as part of the notification that Council will only consider altering parking restrictions near Heathmont Village Shopping Centre if there is significant trader support demonstrated by a joint letter, a formal submission through a representative body (i.e. Traders Group) or a community petition.

Conclusion

It is recommended that Council receives and notes the petition containing 172 signatures requesting the provision of two 15 minute parking bays outside 192 Canterbury Road, Heathmont within the Heathmont Village Shopping Centre.  Noting the level of support for the prayer of the petition, it is recommended that Council endorses the conversion if two 1P parking bays to 15 minute parking.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That council

1.       receives the petition containing 172 signatures

2.       Agrees to convert two one hour parking spaces to two 15 minute parking spaces

3.       advises the lead petitioner accordingly