2014 Maroondah Logo RGB.jpg

 

 

Councillor

(as addressed)

 

 

The next Council Meeting will be held in the Council Chamber, Braeside Avenue, Ringwood, on Monday 27 August 2018, commencing at 7:30pm and your presence is requested.

 

 

Yours faithfully

SKozlows.jpg

 

Steve Kozlowski

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

Note:

This meeting is being streamed live on the internet and recorded.

Every care is taken to maintain privacy and attendees are advised they may be recorded.

 

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Council Chamber
is fitted with a Hearing Aid Induction Loop

 

Switch Hearing Aid to ‘T’ for Reception

 

City Offices

Braeside Avenue, Ringwood, 3134

Postal

PO Box 156, Ringwood 3134

DX 38068, Ringwood

Telephone

1300 88 22 33

 

 

Facsimile

Email

Web

 

Service Centres

Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS): 131 450

National Relay Service (NRS): 133 677

(03) 9298 4345

maroondah@maroondah.vic.gov.au

www.maroondah.vic.gov.au

 

Croydon: Civic Square

REALM: 179 Maroondah Hwy, Ringwood

 


 

 


ORDER OF BUSINESS

1.       Prayer

2.       Acknowledgement of Country

3.       Apologies

4.       Declaration of Interests

5.       Confirmation of Minutes of the Ordinary Council Meeting held on Monday 16 July 2018.

6.       Public Questions

7.       Officers’ Reports

Director Corporate Services

1.       Attendance Report                                                                                                    5

2.       Reports of Assembly of Councillors                                                                         7

3.       Councillor Representation Reports                                                                        10

4.       Sale of Discontinued Right of Way at 3A Dunn Street Ringwood East                 12

5.       Declaring Council Land between 18 and 20-22 Morgan Avenue Croydon a Road 17

6.       Councillors Quarterly Expense and Reimbursement Report - April to June 2018 and Financial Year 2017/18                                                                                           21

7.       Governance Matters                                                                                               24

8.       2018 General Valuation Analysis and Adoption                                                     26

9.       Approval in Principle of 2017/2018 Annual Financial Report & Annual Performance Statement                                                                                                                35

10.     Audit & Risk Advisory Committee Report                                                               40

11.     The Maroondah Foundation - New Board Member                                               42

Director Operations, Assets & Leisure

1.       Petition - Croydon Light Harness Club                                                                   44

2.       Capital Works Report: Fourth Quarter 2017/2018                                                 47

Director Strategy & Community

1.       Maroondah Planning Scheme Amendment C104: Heritage Overlay 14 Wonga Road Ringwood and 46-48 Dickasons Road Heathmont-Exhibited Amendment           53

2.       Maroondah Affordable and Social Housing Policy                                                 59

3.       Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017/18) Progress Report - as at 30 June 2018 63

4.       Local Government Performance Reporting Framework - Quarter 4 Results, 2017/18                                                                                                                                66

5.       Draft Ringwood Metropolitan Activity Centre Masterplan                                      69

Director Development & Amenity

1.       Smokefree Public Places - Proposed Local Law 14 (Amending Local Law)         76

8.       Motions to Review

9.       Late Item

10.     Requests / Leave of Absence

11.     In Camera

Director Corporate Services

1.       Instruments of Appointment and Authorisation

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Attendance Report

Item 1

 

Purpose

To provide an opportunity for Councillors to report on Council activities undertaken since the last Ordinary Meeting of Council and forthcoming ward activities.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

Not Applicable

Issue / discussion

It is intended that the Mayor and Councillors be given the opportunity to present a verbal or written report updating Council on the activities they have undertaken in their role as Councillors and forthcoming ward activities.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

It is appropriate that Councillors formally report to Council upon the activities they have undertaken in their role as Councillors.

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE REPORTS AS PRESENTED BY

COUNCILLORS

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Reports of Assembly of Councillors

Item 2

 

Purpose

To present the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings at the City Offices Ringwood, usually two weeks prior to the formal Council Meeting, and to note the issues discussed.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered. Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

 

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

An Assembly of Councillors, as defined under the Local Government Act 1989 [s.3], is a planned or scheduled meeting, comprising at least five (5) Councillors and one (1) member of Council staff, that considers matters that are intended or likely to be:

 

·        the subject of a decision of the Council; or

·        subject to the exercise of a delegated function, duty or power of Council

Examples of an Assembly of Councillors may include:

 

·        Councillor Briefings (which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings),

·        On-site inspections,

·        Consultative Meetings with residents, developers, consultants,

·        Panel Hearings conducted under s223 of the Act,

·        Meetings with local organisations, Government Departments, statutory authorities, and local politicians

Issue / discussion

As part of decision making processes at Maroondah, it is essential that Councillors are briefed on a range of issues which come before Council for consideration. As a means of providing this information, Assembly of Councillors briefings are conducted.

 

Assemblies are also attended by Council Officers, and sometimes other specific advisors, to provide Councillors with a detailed knowledge and understanding of issues under consideration to a level of detail that would inhibit timely decision-making, that would not be possible in an open Council meeting, where decision-making related debate is governed by strict meeting procedures.

 

The intent of this report is to present the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings, and to note the items discussed.  This information is already available to the public upon request in accordance with the Local Government Act [s.80A].

 

This report and attachments formally table the information items previously covered by Councillors.

 

The ‘Public Record’ of the Assembly of Councillors briefings held on 16 July 2018 and 6 August 2018 is attached for information.

 

The items contained therein were noted.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

Assembly of Councillors briefings are important forums for advice and discussion, on what are often complex issues facing the municipality, in the lead up to formal decisions being made by Councillors at Council Meetings.  At Assemblies, or outside them, Councillors also have the opportunity of requesting additional information to assist in the decision making process.

 

It is appropriate that the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings at the City Offices Ringwood, usually two weeks prior to the formal Council Meeting, be noted at a formal meeting of Council.


 

 

Attachments

1.

2018 July 16 - Assembly of Councillors Public Record

2.

2018 August 06 - Assembly of Councillors Public Record

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE PUBLIC RECORD OF THE ASSEMBLY OF COUNCILLORS BRIEFINGS HELD ON 16 JuLY 2018 and 6 AUGUST 2018

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Councillor Representation Reports

Item 3

 

Purpose

To receive and note the following meeting minutes.

·        Melbourne Metropolitan Local Government Waste (MMLGW) Forum held on 9 August 2018

·        Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee (MDAC) Meeting held on 26 July 2018

·        Maroondah Community Safety Committee (MCSC) Meeting held on 23 July 2018

·        Maroondah Environment Advisory Committee (MEAC) Meeting held on 5 June 2018

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

 

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable.

Background

As part of Council's commitment to the principles and practice of good governance, it is appropriate that Councillors and the Community are formally updated on the actions and activities of the various organisations bodies/advisory groups upon which it is represented.

Issue / discussion

Council is represented on numerous Boards and Organisations. Appointments are made annually by Council at the commencement of the new Mayoral term.

 

Cr Symon is Council’s representative at the Melbourne Metropolitan Local Government Waste (MMLGW) Forum Meeting.

 

Crs Dib and Spears are Council’s representatives at the Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee (MDAC) Meeting.

 

Crs Lamont, Steane and Macdonald are Council’s representatives at the Maroondah Community Safety Committee (MCSC) Meeting.

 

Crs Graham, Macdonald and Marks are Council’s representatives at the Maroondah Environment Advisory Committee (MEAC) Meeting.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

It is appropriate that Councillors and the Community are formally updated on the actions and activities of the various organisations bodies/advisory groups upon which Council is represented.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Melbourne Metropolitan Local Government Waste Forum Minutes - 9 August 2018

2.

Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes - 26 July 2018

3.

Maroondah Community Safety Committee Meeting Minutes - 23 July 2018

4.

Maroondah Environment Advisory Committee Minutes - 5 June 2018

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES the MINUTES of the following:

1.       Melbourne MetropolItan local government waste (mmlgw) forum held on 9 August 2018

2.       Maroondah disability advisory committee (MDAC) meeting held on 26 july 2018

3.       Maroondah Community Safety Committee (MCSC) meeting held on 23 July 2018

4.       Maroondah environment advisory committee (MEAC) meeting held on 5 june 2018

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Sale of Discontinued Right of Way at 3A Dunn Street Ringwood East

Item 4

 

Purpose

To authorise commencement of the legislative procedures to the Local Government Act 1989 (Act) to consider the sale of the discontinued right of way (DROW) known as 3A Dunn Street Ringwood East, as contained in certificate of title, volume 11261 folio 290 – Lot 1 TP 947659U (Land) to the owners of 49 Eastfield Road and 46 Grey Street Ringwood East.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community.

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered. Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes, and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive, and accountable.

8.2     Ensure responsible and sustainable management of Maroondah resources, assets, infrastructure, and natural environment.

Background

Council resolved to discontinue the right of way on 19 July 2010 and was published in the Government Gazette on 20 January 2011.

 

The DROW has been enclosed by the property owners at 46 Grey Street, 3 Dunn Street, and 49 Eastfield Road Ringwood East.

 

In January 2017 Council received a request from the owner of 51 Eastfield Road to purchase the northern section of the DROW adjacent to his property.

 

A request was also received from a Planning company acting on behalf of a prospective purchaser for 49 Eastfield Road, enquiring on the process to purchase the DROW, which had been enclosed by the previous owner. The company was aware of their client’s encroachment of the DROW and of the interest 51 Eastfield Road had in purchasing.

 

In August 2017, expression of interest letters were sent to all adjoining property owners and given to 11 October 2017 to respond.

 

 

 

 

The interested property owners were;

·        46 and 48 Grey Street Ringwood East

·        47A, 49, and 51 Eastfield Road Ringwood East

Councils contract Valuers, Westlink Consulting Pty Ltd, provided a value of the land at $350 per sqm.

Where dual interest was expressed for the same parcel of land, further letters were sent to those owners, requesting them to provide a once only bid over the market value of $350 sqm.

The property boundaries between Grey Street and Eastfield Road are not in line with each other, therefore each property owner would be purchasing different quantities of square metre of land;

·        46 Grey Street owners ‘competed’ with 47A Eastfield Road.

·        48 Grey Street owners ‘competed’ with both 47A & 49 Eastfield Road.

·        49 Eastfield Road owners ‘competed’ with 51 Eastfield Road and 48 Grey Street.

The bids received from the dual interested parties were as follows;

·        46 Grey Street owners offered $400 sqm compared to 47A Eastfield Road offer of $759 sqm for the same portion

·        48 Grey Street owners offered $356 sqm compared to 47A Eastfield Road owners offer of $759 sqm & 49 Eastfield Road owners offer of $351 sqm

·        49 Eastfield Road owners offered $800 sqm compared to 51 Eastfield Road owners offer of $751 sqm

In January 2018, it was brought to Council’s attention that incorrect information relating to adverse possession and compulsory creation of carriageway easement claims was circulating in the neighbourhood.

Legal advice from Council’s solicitors, was sought and subsequently further letters with accurate information were sent to all adjoining property owners, providing them with the opportunity to reconfirm their position.

The advice provided by Council’s solicitors reflected on the following issues;

·        To be successful in an adverse possession claim, the owners would need to establish that they were in continuous and exclusive possession of the land for at least 30 years prior to Council obtaining title, provided that the former road was not a public highway at common law or a public road under the Road Management Act (2004), and

·        Owners would need to demonstrate that the compulsory creation of carriageway easement is necessary and not just desirable or convenient.

Only property owners at 49 & 51 Eastfield Road and 46 Grey Street reconfirmed their bids;

·        49 Eastfield Road offered $802 sqm compared to 51 Eastfield Road offer of $751 sqm

·        46 Grey Street offered $350 sqm

No response was received after letter and reminder emails were sent to 47A Eastfield Road.

The DROW contains a storm water drain, Yarra Valley Water sewer drain (shaded pink on the attached diagram) and a private drain that services 50 & 50A Grey Street (shaded yellow on the attached diagram).

Access will continue through a creation of an easement in favour on Council and Yarra Valley Water and the owners of 50 & 50A Grey Street.

Issue / discussion

Council’s Surveyors have provided the dimensions of land as outlined in the following paragraph.

The current status including land dimensions and associated cost to owner is as follows;

·        Owners at 49 Eastfield Road are recommended to purchase the land

-        that adjoins the side boundary at 51 Eastfield Road for $802 sqm – 91 sqm of land - $72,982 + GST

-        at the rear of their property at adjoins 48 & 50A Grey Street for $350 sqm – 88 sqm of land, $30,800 + GST

-        that lies between 48 Grey Street and 47A Eastfield Road for $350 sqm – 19 sqm for a total of $6,650 + GST

·        Owners at 46 Grey Street are recommended to purchase the land at the rear of their property that adjoins 47A Eastfield Road for $350 sqm – 56 sqm of land - $19,600 + GST

·        The owner at 3 Dunn Street has been notified that they will be required to restore their boundary fence to the correct title boundary should these sales proceed.

No response has been received from the owner at 3 Dunn Street in relation to the sale or the removal of the fence.

Hence, the total monies for the sale of the land will be $130,032 + GST.

Financial / economic issues

The legal and disbursement costs associated with the sale of the DROW land, would be funded by the purchasers in line with Council policy, estimated at $10,000 per property owner. The costs associated with Council’s administration in dealing with property matters are contained within the current budget.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not applicable

Social / community issues

Not applicable

Community consultation

Before proceeding with the sale of the land, Council must give public notice of the proposed sale in accordance with Section 223 of the Act. The Act provides that a person may, within 28 days of the date of the public notice, lodge a written submission regarding the proposed sale of land.

 

Where a person has made a written submission to Council requesting that he or she be heard in support of the written submission, Council must permit that person to be heard before a meeting of Council or the Committee which has delegated authority to hear those submissions, giving reasonable notice of the day, time, and place of meeting.

 

After hearing any submissions made, Council must determine whether or not to proceed with the sale.

Conclusion

It is proposed that Council should commence the statutory procedures pursuant to Section 189 and 223 of the Act, to consider selling the Land to the property owners of 46 Grey Street and 49 Eastfield Road Ringwood East, as outlined above in this report, subject to satisfactory completion of those procedures.

 

 

Attachments

1.

DROW 3A Dunn Street Ringwood East - Drainage Map - Council Report

2.

DROW 3A Dunn Street Ringwood East - Diagram area to be sold - Council Report

3.

DROW 3A Dunn Street Ringwood East - MCC Title Plan - Council Report

4.

DROW 3A Dunn Street - Draft Subdivision - Council Report

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council acting under section 189 of the local government act 1989 (The Act) resolves that:

1.       the statutory procedures be commenced to the sale of the discontinued right of way at 3a dunn street ringwood east, as depicted in attachments 1, 2, 3 & 4 of this report

 

2.       public notice be given in accordance with sections 189, 207a and 223 of the act and with council policy; such notice to state that council proposes to sell the land to the owners of 46 grey street and 49 eastfield road ringwood east for agreed market value

3.       in accordance with section 223 of the act:

i.        a committee comprising ward councillors lamont (mayor), symon and mazzuchelli be appointed to hear any persons wishing to be heard in support of their submission, on a date to be determined;

ii.       considers all written submissions, including a written report on the proceedings of any committee hearing conducted, following which it shall determine whether or not to sell the land as proposed; and

iii.      the director corporate services be authorised to undertake the administrative procedures necessary to enable council to carry out its functions under section 223 of the act in relation to this matter

4.       should no submissions be received, council further resolves that:

i.        having followed all the required statutory procedures pursuant to section 189, 207A and 223 of the act, land comprising of lot 1 title plan 947659u be sold to the owners of 46 grey streEt and 49 eastfield road ringwood east for agreed market value;

ii.       council, yarra valley water and the owners of 50 and 50a grey street ringwood east be granted an easement over their assets and future assets as a condition of sale of lot 1 title plan 947659u

5.       the chief executive officeR, or any other person with the necessary delegation, sign any transfer of land and other documents required to be signed in connection with the sale of the land to the owners of 46 grey street and 49 eastfield road ringwood east

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Declaring Council Land between 18 and 20-22 Morgan Avenue Croydon a road

Item 5

 

Purpose

To authorize the commencement of the legislative requirements to declare Council land (Land) as contained in certificate of title, volume 11818 and folio 430 (Lot 1 PS 743325B) road under section 11 (1) of the Road Management Act 2004 (RMA).

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community.

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered. Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes, and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive, and accountable.

8.2     Ensure responsible and sustainable management of Maroondah resources, assets, infrastructure, and natural environment.

Background

Council received a request from the owner of 20-22 Morgan Avenue Croydon in June 2013, to purchase part of the right of way that ran between 17 and 19 Cass Avenue to between 18 and 20-22 Morgan Avenue Croydon. At the time, Council advised that the land was not available for sale.

 

This right of way, previously known as R1 LP 12823, was later discontinued and in October 2014, Council resolved to sell part of the discontinued right of way (DROW) to the owners of 17 Cass Avenue Croydon.

 

The section of the DROW between 18 and 20-22 Morgan Avenue, was asphalted some time ago, and it is unsure as to who may have constructed the driveway that leads to the rear of the property of 18 Morgan Avenue.

 

The owners of 18 Morgan Avenue have been using the Land to access the carport at the rear of their property, since purchasing in 1993, with this being the only vehicle entry point.

 

In July 2016, Council received a request from the owner’s representative of 20-22 Morgan Avenue, to purchase this Land.

 

Council wrote to the owners of 18 Morgan Avenue, advising them of the interest expressed by 20-22 Morgan Avenue and whether they also had an interest to purchase, however they objected to the sale of the Land to anyone on the grounds that they have always used the Land as a driveway and have been sole users.

 

A Licence Agreement was provided to both owners for the use of the Land, however both did not agree to the liability insurance and maintenance clauses. Council’s solicitors advised that these were standard clauses in protecting Council and its assets.

 

3 options were presented to both owners;

·        Accept Licence Agreement in its current state

·        Sell the Land to 18 Morgan Avenue as having been the sole user of the Land

·        Declare the Land a Public Highway

Both owners responded to the 3rd option as a favourable preference to provide them with access rights over the Land.

Issue / discussion

Council’s solicitors, were again consulted on providing advice on whether Council can declare the Land to be a road for the purposes of the RMA or the Local Government Act 1989 (Act) and the process required on the basis that the road had already been discontinued in 2014.

 

The advice contained the following information:

·        For the Land to be recreated as a road at law, Council must declare the land to be a ‘road’ under section 11 (1) of the RMA. This requires Council to;

-        Consider a report and resolve that the Land be declared as a road under section 11 of the RMA; and

-        Publish a notice in the Victoria Government Gazette, declaring the Land to be a road under section 11 of the RMA

·        Upon publication of the notice in the Government Gazette, the Land becomes a road for the purposes of the RMA and is dedicated to the public as a public highway within the meaning of the common law (section 11(4) of the RMA)

·        This process does not create a ‘public road’ for the purposes of the RMA. To create the road as a ‘public road’, Council must;

-        Consider whether the Road is ‘reasonably required for general public use’ and if it considers that it is, make a resolution to that effect, and

-        Include the Road on Council’s register of public roads under section 17(3) of the RMA.

·        Once the road is on the register, Council has a statutory duty to regularly inspect and maintain the road to the standard prescribed by Council’s road management plan.

·        As the land only benefits the adjoining owners, it does not appear that the Road is reasonably required for general public use at this time.

This ‘road’ will be regarded as an access road only that benefits 2 property owners, and will be maintained by Council to its current condition.

The ‘road’ will not be placed on Council’s public road register as it is not reasonably required for general public use.

The Land contains a 300 mm Council storm water drain, a Yarra Valley Water sewer and a gas main. Easements would continue in favour of Council and the statutory authorities.

Financial / economic issues

Not applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not applicable

Social / community issues

Not applicable

Community consultation

Not applicable

Conclusion

It is proposed that Council consider declaring the Land known as 20A Morgan Avenue Croydon to be a road under the RMA, to provide continued vehicular access to the owners of 18 Morgan Avenue and now vehicular access to the owners of 20-22 Morgan Avenue.

 

 

Attachments

1.

DROW Morgan Avenue - Council Title Plan - PS 743325

2.

Aerial 20A Morgan

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That council acting under section 11 (1) of the road management act (2004)

1.       declareS the land adjoining 18 and 20-22 morgan avenue croydon, being the whole of the land contained in the certificate of title volume 11818 folio 430 (land) to be a road for the reason that;

i.        the land is currently required for vehicular access to the rear of 18 morgan avenue croydon by the owner, and

ii.       the owner of 20-22 morgan avenue croydon wishes to use the land for vehicular access

2.       directs that a notice pursuant to section 11 (1) of the Road management act (2004) be published in the victoria government gazette

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Councillors Quarterly Expense and Reimbursement Report - April to June 2018 and Financial Year 2017/18

Item 6

 

Purpose

To provide a report to the community on Councillor expenses.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community.

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an empowered community that is actively engaged in council decision making through processes that consider the needs and aspirations of all ages and population groups.  Council will provide strong and responsive leadership, ensuring transparency, while working with the community to advocate for and ‘champion’ local needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable.

Background

The Councillor Expenses, Support and Reimbursement Policy was adopted by Council on 27 March 2017.

In accordance with Section 75 of the Local Government Act 1989, Council is required to reimburse a Councillor for expenses incurred whilst performing his or her duties as a Councillor. Council is also required to adopt and maintain a Policy in relation to the reimbursement of expenses for Councillors. The Policy provides guidance for the payment of reimbursements of expenses and the provision of resources, facilities and other support to the Mayor and Councillors to enable them to discharge their duties.

 

Council also publishes in its Annual Report the details of the expenses, including reimbursement of expenses for each Councillor and member of a Council Committee paid by the Council. The details of the expenses for the financial year are set out in the 2017/18 Annual Report.

Issue / discussion

This is a standard Governance reporting item.

Financial / economic issues

A budget of $102,000 in the 2017/2018 financial year exists for the expenses and reimbursement of Councillors. A budget of $12,000 is allocated to the Office of the Mayor for the provision of a vehicle for the November 2017 – November 2018 Mayoral term.

Councillor

TR

($)

CM

($)

CC

($)

IC

($)

CT

($)

CCA

($)

Total

April to June

($)

YTD

Total

July to June

$

Tony Dib JP

 

338.73

0

0

*586.81

0

0

*925.54

*9,549.63

Paul Macdonald

 

1,205.96

0

0

*632.44

2,280.82

145.30

*4,264.52

*6,077.89

Kylie Spears

 

663.53

0

0

*580.08

2,126.64

50.60

*3,420.85

*4,459.63

Nora Lamont

Mayor

0

3,000.00#

0

*583.68

0

48.30

*3,631.98

*9,090.29

Samantha Marks

 

0

0

0

*558.10

0

0

*558.10

*754.16

Mike Symon

Deputy Mayor

 

0

54.60

0

*580.59

540.00

0

*1,175.19

*10,394.66

Marijke Graham

 

779.48

0

0

*592.44

1,715.89

164.00

*3,251.81

*5,637.06

Michael Macdonald

 

0

0

0

*554.30

0

0

*554.30

*1,467.13

Rob Steane

 

735.99

0

0

*607.08

1,385.39

99.30

*2,827.76

*7,157.20

TOTAL

 

$3,723.69

$3,054.60#

0

*$5,275.52

$8,048.74

$507.50

$20,610.05

$52,880.54

 

Legend: TR-Travel, CM-Car Mileage (# a budget allocation of $12,000 is allocated to the Office of the Mayor for the provision of a vehicle for the Nov 17 – Nov 18 Mayoral term), CC-Child Care, IC-Information and Communication expenses (* includes annual data plan), CT- Conferences and Training expenses, CCA-Civic and Community Attendance

 

Note: No expenses were paid by Council including reimbursements to members of Council Committees during the year.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

Not Applicable

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL NOTES THE COUNCILLORS EXPENSE AND REIMBURSEMENT REPORT FOR APRIL TO JUNE 2018 AND FINANCIAL YEAR 2017/18

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Governance Matters

Item 7

 

Purpose

To appoint formal Council representation to the Eastern Transport Coalition for the period August 2018 to November 2018, and consider rescheduling the October Ordinary Meeting of Council from 22 October to 29 October 2018.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose in this report.

 

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs.

 

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

 

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Issue / discussion

Council, at its meeting on 21 November 2017, as part of its annual review of Committee representation, appointed Cr Michael Macdonald as its representative to the Eastern Transport Coalition, with Cr Kylie Spears and the Transport & Sustainability Planner and/or Team Leader Strategic Planning & Sustainability as substitute representatives.

 

The Eastern Transport Coalition is one of a number of external Committees which have external key stakeholders/advisors as active participants.

 

Following the recent resignation of Michael Macdonald as a Councillor for the Wyreena Ward, effective 13 July 2018, it is necessary for Council to now review its representation on the Eastern Transport Coalition for the remaining period up until November 2018.

 

It is also necessary to consider rescheduling the October Ordinary Meeting of Council from 22 October to 29 October 2018, due to operational commitments.

Financial / economic issues

Not applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not applicable

Social / community issues

Not applicable

Community consultation

Not applicable

Conclusion

That Council considers appointing its representative to the Eastern Transport Coalition, for the remaining period up until November 2018 and rescheduling the October Ordinary Meeting.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT

 

1.       COUNCILLOR …………………………….BE APPOINTED AS COUNCIL’S REPRESENTATIVE TO THE EASTERN TRANSPORT COALITION, WITH CR SPEARS AND THE TRANSPORT & SUSTAINABILITY PLANNER AND/OR TEAM LEADER STRATEGIC PLANNING & SUSTAINABILITY TO REMAIN AS SUBSTITUTE REPRESENTATIVES, FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 2018 TO NOVEMBER 2018

 

2.       THE OCTOBER ORDINARY MEETING OF COUNCIL BE RESCHEDULED FROM 22 OCTOBER TO 29 OCTOBER 2018

 

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

2018 General Valuation Analysis and Adoption

Item 8

 

Purpose

The purpose of this report is to advise the outcome of the 2018 General Property Revaluation, confirm or amend the estimated valuation and rate in the dollar data used in the preparation of the 2018/2019 Budget documentation and recommend the adoption of the resulting valuations.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that consider the needs and aspirations of all ages and population groups. Council provides strong and responsive leadership; ensures transparency, while working with the community to advocate for and ‘champion’ local needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

8.2     Ensure responsible and sustainable management of Maroondah’s resources, assets, infrastructure and natural environment

8.3     Provide community inspired leadership in democratic governance

Background

In 1994 all metropolitan Councils were required to conduct revaluations every four (4) years, as at a date known as the “relevant date”. Values for the 1996 General Valuation were set at the relevant date of June 30, 1994.

 

From 2000, the State Government amended general valuations to be conducted every two years and in accordance with best practice standards determined by the Valuer General Victoria.

 

The reduction in the period between general valuations is intended to mitigate against abrupt changes in property valuations and reduce rating fluctuation levels.

 

The date appointed for determining value levels for the 2018 General Valuation was
1 January 2018, which means that the values are based on the prevailing market conditions at this date.

 

The process of the General Valuation involved updating the database of all attributes, completing an analysis of property sales, deriving levels of value and the application of those levels to individual properties. This process is accompanied by physical inspections of a third of all residential properties in Maroondah, all commercial and industrial properties, and any properties that were sold since 1 January 2016.

Issue / discussion

The following analysis of the 2018 General Property Revaluation has been prepared.

 

Overall Capital Improved Valuation Movements

 

Council’s Capital Improved rating base has increased from $32.294 billion (based on all assessments currently rated, and valued as at January 2016) to $38.149 billion. This represents an overall increase of $5.855 billion or approximately 18.1%.

 

There has been a significant increase in values across Maroondah since the last revaluation.

 

Valuation fluctuations have no bearing on the total rate revenue collected by Council.  Council determines the amount to be raised by rates as part of its budget considerations.  Property valuations merely determine the amount each property is required to pay to generate the total amount determined by Council.

 

Capital Improved Valuation Movements by Property Type

 

Analysis of the movement in Capital Improved Value has been separated into five major property types – residential, commercial/retail, industrial, vacant land, and those on the cultural and recreational rate.

 

The following table depicts the movement in total Capital improved Valuations between January 2016 and January 2018:

 

Table 1: Movement in Total Capital Improved Valuations by Property/Rate Types

 

Property Type

Number of Assessments

Total 2016 CIV

Total 2018 CIV

Increase

%

Residential

45,362

$27,825,925,000

$33,284,835,000

$5,458,910,000

19.6%

Commercial

2,204

$2,812,848,000

$3,085,688,000

$272,840,000

9.7%

Industrial

1,967

$1,450,521,291

$1,539,304,500

$88,783,209

6.1%

Vacant Land

237

$190,525,000

$224,840,000

$34,315,000

18.0%

Cult/Rec

3

$14,710,000

$14,990,000

$280,000

1.9%

Total

49,773

$32,294,529,291

$38,149,657,500

$5,855,128,209

18.1%

 

“Total 2018 CIV” is the total value of current rateable properties as at June 2018, based on the level of value at 1 January 2018.

 

Shift in the Rating Base

 

Measuring the shift in the rating base involves weighting each of the property types to determine the relative movement. The following redistributive effects have been derived in this manner.

 

 

 

 

 

Table 2: Effective Movement in Rating Liability (all other factors equal)

 

Property Type

Number of Assessments

Total 2016 CIV

Total 2018 CIV

Redistribution Effect (%)

Residential

45,362

$27,825,925,000

$33,284,835,000

1.1%

Commercial

2,204

$2,812,848,000

$3,085,688,000

-0.6%

Industrial

1,967

$1,450,521,291

$1,539,304,500

-0.5%

Vacant Land

237

$190,525,000

$224,840,000

0.0%

Total

49,770

$32,279,819,291

$38,134,667,500

 

*Total CIV excludes properties assessed on cultural-recreation rates

 

The implication of this table is that, if all other factors stayed the same (i.e. there was no rate in the dollar change), the portion of the total rates residential ratepayers would change by 1.1%.

 

The re-distribution effect on the rating burden is a natural outcome of the general revaluation and is the intended consequence of a property valuation based taxation system.

 

Shift in the Rating Base by Suburbs

As indicated above, the aggregated total can tend to hide movements between different geographic areas. The following table reveals the extent of movements in total capital improved valuations for each suburb:

 

Table 3: Total Capital Improved Valuation Movements by Suburb

 

Suburb

Number of Assessments

Total 2016 CIV

Total 2018 CIV

Increase

%

Bayswater North

4,530

$2,628,013,215

$3,086,306,500

$458,293,285

17.4%

Croydon

12,866

$7,035,126,883

$8,559,691,000

$1,524,564,117

21.7%

Croydon Hills

1,698

$1,147,201,165

$1,382,620,000

$235,418,835

20.5%

Croydon North

3,093

$1,869,598,441

$2,314,799,000

$445,200,559

23.8%

Croydon South

2,025

$1,259,240,160

$1,490,140,000

$230,899,840

18.3%

Heathmont

3,917

$2,710,445,000

$3,207,055,000

$496,610,000

18.3%

Kilsyth

863

$471,346,277

$569,740,000

$98,393,723

20.9%

Kilsyth South

1,198

$831,519,770

$966,462,500

$134,942,730

16.2%

Park Orchards

20

$30,500,000

$35,235,000

$4,735,000

15.5%

Ringwood

9,534

$7,161,855,776

$8,123,516,500

$961,660,724

13.4%

Ringwood East

4,528

$2,936,083,000

$3,491,680,000

$555,597,000

18.9%

Ringwood North

3,592

$2,768,893,441

$3,237,000,000

$468,106,559

16.9%

Vermont

160

$111,430,000

$129,215,000

$17,785,000

16.0%

Warranwood

1,645

$1,255,264,775

$1,463,587,000

$208,322,225

16.6%

Wonga Park

104

$78,011,388

$92,610,000

$14,598,612

18.7%

Total

49,773

$32,294,529,291

$38,149,657,500

$5,855,128,209

18.1%

 

The increase in values has been relatively consistent across all the suburbs within Maroondah.

 

 

Capital Improved Valuation Movement by Suburb for each Property Type

A further breakdown of the aggregate totals is provided in the following tables, which identify the movements in value for each property type in each suburb:

 

Table 4: Residential

 

Suburb

Number of Assessments

Total 2016 CIV

Total 2018 CIV

Increase

%

Bayswater North

3,591

$1,778,345,000

$2,201,655,000

$423,310,000

23.8%

Croydon

12,042

$6,504,305,000

$7,953,380,000

$1,449,075,000

22.3%

Croydon Hills

1,693

$1,145,840,000

$1,380,880,000

$235,040,000

20.5%

Croydon North

3,012

$1,823,490,000

$2,260,160,000

$436,670,000

23.9%

Croydon South

1,852

$1,063,380,000

$1,288,255,000

$224,875,000

21.1%

Heathmont

3,793

$2,625,195,000

$3,109,370,000

$484,175,000

18.4%

Kilsyth

758

$372,925,000

$468,005,000

$95,080,000

25.5%

Kilsyth South

957

$631,470,000

$758,750,000

$127,280,000

20.2%

Park Orchards

20

$30,500,000

$35,235,000

$4,735,000

15.5%

Ringwood

7,923

$4,904,595,000

$5,663,355,000

$758,760,000

15.5%

Ringwood East

4,362

$2,819,280,000

$3,357,125,000

$537,845,000

19.1%

Ringwood North

3,494

$2,699,150,000

$3,143,625,000

$444,475,000

16.5%

Vermont

158

$110,465,000

$128,020,000

$17,555,000

15.9%

Warranwood

1,604

$1,238,995,000

$1,444,425,000

$205,430,000

16.6%

Wonga Park

103

$77,990,000

$92,595,000

$14,605,000

18.7%

Total

45,362

$27,825,925,000

$33,284,835,000

$5,458,910,000

19.6%

 

There has been an overall valuation increase of 19.6% in the residential sector – which comprises residential house, units, rental flats and residential allotments with unit development potential.

 

There has been a significant increase in residential values across Maroondah since the last revaluation driven largely by a strengthening of the market.

 

The graph following shows the movement in median sale prices for both residential dwellings and units since the start of 2015.

Median House and Unit Sale Price Movement

 

Table 5: Commercial & Retail

 

Suburb

Number of Assessments

Total 2016 CIV

Total 2018 CIV

Increase

%

Bayswater North

122

$208,370,000

$221,571,000

$13,201,000

6.3%

Croydon

510

$385,806,000

$441,831,000

$56,025,000

14.5%

Croydon North

47

$33,999,000

$39,109,000

$5,110,000

15.0%

Croydon South

56

$23,305,000

$25,975,000

$2,670,000

11.5%

Heathmont

110

$69,715,000

$80,390,000

$10,675,000

15.3%

Kilsyth

15

$10,140,000

$11,405,000

$1,265,000

12.5%

Kilsyth South

61

$57,835,000

$59,775,000

$1,940,000

3.4%

Ringwood

1,047

$1,851,253,000

$1,994,832,000

$143,579,000

7.8%

Ringwood East

149

$108,250,000

$124,190,000

$15,940,000

14.7%

Ringwood North

70

$56,245,000

$77,540,000

$21,295,000

37.9%

Vermont

1

$740,000

$935,000

$195,000

26.4%

Warranwood

16

$7,190,000

$8,135,000

$945,000

13.1%

Total

2,204

$2,812,848,000

$3,085,688,000

$272,840,000

9.7%

Retail across Maroondah has strengthened in the tightly-held prime retail strips of Heathmont, Ringwood North, Railway Avenue in Ringwood East and Main Street in Croydon. Increases have also been evident within secondary and neighborhood retail strips.

There has been nominal rental growth with existing leases increasing at fixed rates or CPI, and new leases showing minimal movement from those levels. The sales activity remains from a mixture of both owner-occupiers and investors.

The prime Ringwood commercial locations along Maroondah Highway have significantly increased in value since the last revaluation due to the Ringwood Activity Centre zoning overlay and the recent completion of the redevelopment of Eastland Shopping Centre and Ringwood Train Station.

Maroondah has a limited amount of premium or A-grade office premises outside of those around the Ringwood Law Courts on Ringwood Street and newer office building developments along Maroondah Highway and New Street. There remains reasonable demand from owner-occupiers for smaller office space in the local/neighbourhood locations across Maroondah.

 

Table 6: Industrial

 

Suburb

Number of Assessments

Total 2016 CIV

Total 2018 CIV

Increase

%

Bayswater North

789

$604,898,215

$626,195,500

$21,297,285

3.5%

Croydon

243

$103,145,883

$112,685,000

$9,539,117

9.2%

Croydon South

104

$157,390,160

$160,360,000

$2,969,840

1.9%

Kilsyth

88

$87,316,277

$89,145,000

$1,828,723

2.1%

Kilsyth South

174

$130,119,770

$135,302,500

$5,182,730

4.0%

Ringwood

529

$360,132,776

$407,269,500

$47,136,724

13.1%

Other Suburbs

40

$7,518,210

$8,347,000

$828,790

11.0%

Total

1,967

$1,450,521,291

$1,539,304,500

$88,783,209

6.1%

Maroondah consists of mainly older industrial areas and estates, with the exception of the Merrindale Estate which has been developing from the early 1990’s. Merrindale industrial estate In Croydon South comprises a range of concrete panel factories and warehouses, interspersed with vacant industrial allotments.

Industrial in Ringwood and Croydon are predominantly older and there are more ‘service’ based industrial premises (i.e. mechanics, shop fitters and cabinet makers) with properties in Bayswater North and Kilsyth South predominantly used for manufacturing and warehousing. It is also worth noting that although Ringwood is located closest to the Eastlink freeway, the roadways are not ideal for large truck movement and many of the developments have access issues.

Table 7: Vacant Land

 

Suburb

Number of Assessments

Total 2014 CIV

Total 2016 CIV

Increase

%

Bayswater North

27

$35,210,000

$35,670,000

$460,000

1.3%

Croydon

71

$41,870,000

$51,795,000

$9,925,000

23.7%

Croydon Hills

3

$1,310,000

$1,700,000

$390,000

29.8%

Croydon North

22

$9,135,000

$12,140,000

$3,005,000

32.9%

Croydon South

13

$15,165,000

$15,550,000

$385,000

2.5%

Heathmont

10

$11,135,000

$12,665,000

$1,530,000

13.7%

Kilsyth

2

$965,000

$1,185,000

$220,000

22.8%

Kilsyth South

5

$2,750,000

$3,265,000

$515,000

18.7%

Ringwood

35

$45,875,000

$58,060,000

$12,185,000

26.6%

Ringwood East

11

$7,655,000

$9,305,000

$1,650,000

21.6%

Ringwood North

18

$10,455,000

$12,470,000

$2,015,000

19.3%

Vermont

1

$225,000

$260,000

$35,000

15.6%

Warranwood

19

$8,775,000

$10,775,000

$2,000,000

22.8%

Total

237

$190,525,000

$224,840,000

$34,315,000

18.0%

Table 8: Cultural/Recreational Rate

 

Suburb

Number of Assessments

Total 2016 CIV

Total 2018 CIV

Increase

%

Bayswater North Tennis Club

1

$1,190,000

$1,215,000

$25,000

2.1%

Heathmont Bowls Club

1

$4,175,000

$4,405,000

$230,000

5.5%

Eastwood Golf Course

1

$9,345,000

$9,370,000

$25,000

0.3%

Total

3

$14,710,000

$14,990,000

$280,000

1.9%

 

Maroondah currently has three properties on the cultural and recreation rate.

 

Budget Confirmation of Valuation Data

 

The preparation of budget documentation is undertaken in February/March. The Stage 4 (residential component) of the revaluation is due to be lodged with the Valuer General’s Office by the 31 March. Given the timing requirements of the budget, Council is required to use estimated valuations that will not be confirmed until Stage 5 of the revaluation process which is not due to be submitted to the Valuer General under Valuation Best Practice guidelines until 30 April 2018.

 

Upon checking the results of Stage 5 of the revaluation the following minor adjustments outlined in table 9 are required to the Rating information that forms part of the adopted budget. There is no material change to any expenditure or income totals adopted as part of the budgetary process. The refinement of this data will flow through to the adopted budget documentation where applicable.

 

Table 9 – Rate in the Dollar 18/19 Budget Adjustment

 

Category

Rate in the Dollar

Commercial Rate

 

0.228367 cents in the dollar of Capital Improved Value

Industrial Rate

 

0.228367 cents in the dollar of Capital Improved Value

Vacant Land Rate

 

0.285459 cents in the dollar of Capital Improved Value

Other Land Rate

 

0.190306 cents in the dollar of Capital Improved Value

 

The following table identifies the impact for the rating of cultural and recreational lands in line with Council’s adopted rating strategy.

 

 

 

Land

$

Heathmont Club Inc.

5,448.90

Bayswater North Tennis Club

1,502.90

Eastwood Golf Club

11,590.55

Financial / economic issues

The property general valuation will impact on the distribution of rating liability across the municipality. However, movements in individual property values do not translate directly into corresponding shifts in rating liability. As Council adjusts the Rate in the Dollar after a revaluation to achieve a given sum of total rate revenue.

 

The nexus between the Rate in the Dollar and the rate liability is thus broken each time a General Revaluation occurs.

 

Hence, the impact on individual, rate payments will only be determined once a new rating structure has been settled.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Consultation has occurred, through Council’s budgeting processes, in the application of the new valuations in the context of determining the total revenue to be raised.

Conclusion

The 2018 General valuation has been completed in accordance with relevant legislation and Council can proceed to adopt the valuation for rating purposes.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That council

1.       having caused a valuation of all rateable property within its municipal district to be made and returned in accordance with section 13dc of the valuation of land act 1960, hereby determines to adopt that valuation for the purpose of making its rate

2.       notes the changes that have occurred in valuation levels between varying property types and varying suburbs

3.       as a result of the confirmation of the stage 5 valuation figures further determines that those figures in the adopted 2018/19 budget document be amended to reflect the Rate in the dollar amounts as outlined in table 9 of this report in line with the refinement of the valuation

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Approval in Principle of 2017/2018 Annual Financial Report & Annual Performance Statement

Item 9

 

Purpose

To receive and consider the recommendation of the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee in relation to the Annual Financial Report, and the Annual Performance Statement for the year ended 30 June 2018 (termed collectively as ‘the Documents’), to give approval in principle to the Documents, to authorise two Councillors to sign the Forms of Certification for the Documents and to authorise the Principal Accounting Officer to make non-significant changes to the Documents prior to certification.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

Approval in Principle

 

Section 132 (2) of the Local Government Act 1989 (the Act) provides that a Council must not submit its Annual Financial Report and Annual Performance Statement to the Auditor-General unless it has passed a resolution giving its approval in principle to that Report. The major element in the approval process adopted by Council is the consideration of the Documents by Council’s Audit & Risk Advisory Committee.

 

At its meeting on 15 August 2018 the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee conducted a review of the Documents. The Committee sought and received responses from both the Auditor-General’s contractor and Council’s Principal Accounting Officer in respect of the Documents and then resolved as follows:

·        The Annual Finance Report and Performance Statement including closing report be received and noted.

·        The Audit and Risk Advisory Committee recommends that Council record its approval ‘in principle’ to the annual financial report and financial statement (the statements) for the year ended 30 June 2018; and that subject to the review of the final version of the financial report and the performance statement, Council authorise the:

-        Chief Executive Officer to send the statements to the Auditor-General;

-        Chief Executive Officer, the Mayor and a Councillor to certify the final version of the statements;

-        Manager Finance & Governance to implement any non-material changes to the statements as recommended by the Auditor-General, and provide a summary of any such changes to the Audit and Risk Advisory Committee at its next meeting. Any material changes will be discussed with the Chair of the Audit and Risk Advisory Committee prior to being presented to Council.

 

Council officers will address the matters raised by the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee partly in consultation with the Auditor-General Victoria.

 

The next actions as per the Auditor-General in respect of the finalisation of the Documents and the production of the Annual Report are:

·        Submission of the ‘approved in principle’ Documents to the Auditor-General

·        Notification to Council of any amendments of significance agreed with the Auditor

·        The certification of the Documents (as amended if required) by two designated Councillors; and

·        Issue of the Auditor-General’s report on the Documents.

The approval in principle of the Documents as sought by the recommendation in this report is a crucial component in the path to achievement of these target milestones. The Documents have been previously distributed to Councillors.

 

Certification

 

Sections 132 (5) of the Act provides that Council must authorise two Councillors to certify the Documents in their final form after any changes recommended, or agreed to, by the Auditor-General have been made.

 

In addition to the certification by Councillors, the Local Government (Finance and Reporting) Regulations 2004 require that Annual Financial Report be certified by the Chief Executive Officer and the Principal Accounting Officer, and the Annual Performance Statement be certified by the Chief Executive Officer.

 

Treatment of Changes to the Approved Report

 

In the event that changes are required to be made to the Documents under Section 132 (5) of the Act, the Auditor-General has recommended that certifying officers:

·        Formally draw Council’s attention to significant changes prior to the certification of the Documents; and

·        Process non-significant changes without further formal approval.

Significant changes will cover amendments involving material movements to either the financial or performance results or status of Council, the statements of accounting policy and/or the manner of presentation of the Documents.

Issue / discussion

Performance for 2017/18

 

The Financial Statements for 2017/18, which have been prepared based on the Australian equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards (AIFRS), disclose a surplus for the period of $12.588m. This compares with anticipated Adopted Budget surplus of $6.590m. Comments on the major reasons for this increase in performance against the budgeted surplus and other significant factors affecting Council’s financial position are provided below:

·        Statutory Fees and Fines: $0.696m

-        Favourable variance in this category relates mostly to an increase in the volume and complexity of the planning applications, with the individual statutory planning application fees increasing by $452k.

·        Grants Operating: $1.949m

-        Favourable variance is a result of the Victorian Grants Commission bringing forward the half payment of the estimated 2018-19 Financial Assistance Grant of $0.552m and Melba Multi Sport Complex $0.707m which was not budgeted for.

·        Grants Capital: $1.554m

-        Relates to grants received in relation to East Ringwood Pavilion $0.95m, CCTV $0.506m (RMAC, East Ringwood and Croydon), Roads to Recovery $0.387k and Springfield Sporting Pavilion $0.25k

·        Contributions – Non-Monetary $1.890m

-        Council received title to Land for four reserves in a development in Bayswater North. These donated assets were not budgeted.

·        Other Expenses ($4.084m)

-        The major contributors to the unfavourable variance are Roads $1.4m, Footpaths $0.564m and Parks $0.560.

·        Capital Expenditure for the year totalled $25.543m against a budget for the year of $27.254m.

After allowing for the financial effect of the above movements and adjustments, Council has performed well in relation to actual achievements against its 2017/18 Adopted Budget. In addition, the levels of assets and liabilities as recorded in the Balance Sheet are substantially in line with the projections contained in Council’s Annual Budget and Long Term Financial Strategy.

 

Council’s overall financial status remains strong with a total net equity of $2.145b, current assets of $61.882m, cash and investment assets (including Other Financial Assets) of $51.769m and a working capital ratio of 2.04:1.

 

The Auditor-General’s contractor (HLB Mann Judd Chartered Accountants) has reported to the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee that their audit procedures conducted to date have not identified in the Documents any items of a nature that should give rise to undue concern by Council.

Financial / economic issues

The audit, scrutiny and certification of the Documents are an integral part of overall financial stewardship and control. The results of that audit and scrutiny reveal that the financial status of Council as at 30 June 2018 is healthy and provides a solid foundation for the achievement of targets in its 2018/19 Budget.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

When subsequently published in Council’s Annual Report, the Annual Performance Statement will provide the community with details of a wide range of service performance and financial performance measurements arising from the Local Government Performance Reporting Framework and which have been audited. Additional indicators within this framework are also included in Council’s Annual Report.

Community consultation

The Documents will form a major component of Council’s 2017/18 Annual Report.

 

Under Section 133 of the Act, Council must give public notice that:

·        The Annual Report has been prepared;

·        The report of the Auditor under Section 9 of the Audit Act 1994 has been received; and

·        These documents can be inspected at the Council Offices during normal working hours.

In accordance with the Section 133 and in due course, a public notice will be placed in ‘The Age’ newspaper and the local press and copies of the Annual Report will be made available for public inspection at all Council’s Service Centres, Libraries and on the homepage.

 

Section 134 of the Act provides that the Annual Report must be considered at a meeting of Council. The Act also stipulates that the meeting must be advertised, must be held within one month of submission of the Report to the Minister, and must be kept open to the public while the Report is discussed.

Conclusion

Council can duly consider the approval in principle and subsequent certification of the Documents with the knowledge that the Documents as tabled have been the subject of both audit by the Auditor-General’s contractor and also of detailed examination and scrutiny by Council’s Audit & Risk Advisory Committee.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Financial Statements - 2017-18

2.

2018 - Audit Documents - Performance Statement - Final

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL

1.       APPROVES IN PRINCIPLE THE 2017/18 ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT AND ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 132(2) OF THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT 1989

2.       AUTHORISES THE MAYOR COUNCILLOR LAMONT AND COUNCILLOR SYMON AS AUDIT AND RISK ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBERS, TO SIGN THE CERTIFICATION OF THE 2017/18 ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT AND THE ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 132(5) OF THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT 1989

3.       AUTHORISES MR ANTONIO ROCCA AS PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING OFFICER TO MAKE, WITHOUT FURTHER FORMAL NOTIFICATION TO COUNCIL, NON-MATERIAL CHANGES TO THE 2017/18 ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT AND ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT WHICH HAVE PREVIOUSLY BEEN APPROVED IN PRINCIPLE BY COUNCIL IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 132(5) OF THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT 1989

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Audit & Risk Advisory Committee Report

Item 10

 

Purpose

To report to Council on the outcomes of the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee Meeting held on 15 August 2018.

Strategic / policy issues

The Local Government Act 1989 prescribes that Council must establish an Audit & Risk Advisory Committee and that such Committee will be advisory in nature. The Audit & Risk Advisory Committee provides a mechanism for Council to strategically examine various aspects of the Council operations to ensure risk management, legal compliance, financial control and governance measures are in place.

Background

Council’s Audit & Risk Advisory Committee consists of both Council and external representatives. The Mayor Nora Lamont, and Deputy Mayor Mike Symon, are Council representatives on the Committee.

 

The external members are Dr John Watson (chair), Mr Bruce Potgieter and Mr Michael Ulbrick.

 

The Audit & Risk Advisory Committee Charter requires that this Committee report to Council on the findings and recommendations from its meetings. This report provides a summary of matters under consideration by the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee of the meeting held on Wednesday 15 August 2018.

Issue / discussion

The Audit & Risk Advisory Committee refers the following items to Council for information.

 

Annual Financial Report and Annual Performance Statement for the Year Ended 30 June 2018

 

The Annual Financial Report and Annual Performance Statement for the Year Ended 30 June 2018 were presented for the consideration and approval in principle of the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee. An overview of the Statements was provided and answers given to a number of queries (attached). The Committee resolved unanimously as follows:

 

The Audit & Risk Advisory Committee has received and noted the Financial Statements, and the Performance Report from management and the Closing Report to the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee from the External Auditor. The Audit & Risk Advisory Committee recommends that Council receives and adopts the Financial Statements and Performance Report for the year end 2017/2018, subject to the resolution of any outstanding items in Appendix A of the Closing Report to the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee in consultation with the Auditor-General, Victoria and the minor enhancements as suggested by the members of the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee.

 

The Committee determined to advise Council that, following detailed examination and scrutiny of the Statements by the Committee, it approved in principle the report. This item is listed separately on the 27 August 2018 Council Notice Paper.

FINANCIAL / ECONOMIC ISSUES

Council’s budget provides for the operation of the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee and for the completion of the year end financials.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

This report provides a summary of the outcomes of the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee meeting held on Wednesday 15 August 2018.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Audit & Risk Advisory Committee - 2017-18 Financial Statements Queries and Analytics - August 2018

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE REPORT FROM THE AUDIT & RISK ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON Wednesday 15 AUGUST 2018

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

The Maroondah Foundation - New Board Member

Item 11

 

Purpose

The purpose of this report is to appoint a new Member to The Maroondah Foundation to fill a vacancy that currently exists.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area: A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision: Maroondah will be a vibrant and diverse city with a healthy and active community, living in green and leafy neighbourhoods which are connected to thriving and accessible activity centres contributing to a prosperous economy within a safe, inclusive and sustainable environment.

Key Directions 2018-2019:

 

8.9     Create opportunities for shared decision making through active community involvement.

 

8.11   Foster a Council culture of collaboration and partnerships with individuals, community groups, businesses, service providers and other levels of government.

 

8.13   Encourage individuals, groups and organisations to proactively connect with and contribute to their local community.

 

8.14   Work in partnership to deliver services that recognise and are responsive to the interests and needs of the community.

Background

The Maroondah Foundation was established in May 2015, as a Public Ancillary Trust through which donors, be they individuals, families, businesses, community groups or local governments can fulfil their philanthropic interests. Contributions to The Maroondah Foundation are invested and funds available from these contributions and interest earned on investments can then be distributed to Maroondah charities.

 

The Constitution of Maroondah Foundation Trustee Limited Item 18 provides for Directors. The current Directors are existing members of the Maroondah City Council, with the expectation that all or a majority of the Directors will be members of Maroondah City Council.

 

Due to the recent resignation of Councillor Michael Macdonald from Council a single vacancy has been created on the Board. It is appropriate to consider the appointment of Cr Tasa Damante to a position of Director on the Board.

 

 

 

Issue / discussion

As noted in the Constitution of Maroondah Foundation Trustee Limited (Item 19.1.5), the office of a Director will be vacated if:

 

in the case of a Director who was appointed at a time when he or she was a member of Maroondah City Council, the Director ceases to be a member of Maroondah City Council by reason of the expiry of his term of office as a Councillor and in addition is not re-elected.

 

Following the resignation of Councillor Michael Macdonald effective on July 12, 2018, Cr Tasa Damante was elected to Council via a countback held by the VEC on July 16, 2018.

 

Item 18.3 of the Constitution of Maroondah Foundation Trustee Limited states that new or additional Directors of the Company are appointed by the Board with the prior approval of Maroondah City Council.

 

It is proposed that Cr Tasa Damante be appointed as a Director of The Maroondah Foundation Trustee Limited.

Financial / economic issues

Given that this is a governance matter, there are no financial or economic issues associated with this item.

Social / community issues

Given that this is a governance matter, there are no social or community issues associated with this item.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT COUNCIL APPOINTS CR TASA DAMANTE AS A DIRECTOR OF THE MAROONDAH FOUNDATION TRUSTEE LIMITED

 

  


DIRECTOR Operations, Assets & Leisure Adam Todorov

 

Petition - Croydon Light Harness Club

Item 1

 

Purpose

The purpose of this report is for Council to receive a petition containing 560 signatures in response to Council’s proposed Eastfield Park Enhancement Plan draft concept.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in the Maroondah 2040:  Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report:

 

Outcome Area:  Safe, healthy and active community

 

Vision Statement:  In 2040 Maroondah will be a safe, healthy and active community with local opportunities provided for people of all ages and abilities to have high levels of social emotional and physical wellbeing.

 

Key Directions 2018 - 2019

 

1.21   Support and empower local community groups, sporting clubs and special interest groups across Maroondah.

Background

Council received a petition on Monday 16 July 2018 containing 560 signatures.

 

The prayer of the petition is as follows:

 

“We the undersigned, petition the Mayor and Councillors of the Maroondah City Council to: Allow the Croydon Light Harness Club to permanently remain at Eastfield Park and continue using the stabling and trotting track facilities located there.”

Issue / discussion

Council has recently released the Eastfield Park Enhancement Plan draft concept seeking feedback from the Maroondah community.  The design was based on community and stakeholder consultation, detailed site investigations and previous Council strategic planning outcomes.  The draft concept did not include provision for the Croydon Light Harness Club.

 

The Eastfield Park Enhancement Plan draft concept proposes:

·        A new facility for the Mullum Mullum Indigenous Gathering Place;

·        Additional sports fields and improved facilities for cricket, football and soccer;

·        A new pavilion;

·        Picnic facilities;

·        Water play area;

·        Roll play area;

·        Boardwalks and improved walking trails;

·        Wetlands and storm water harvesting;

·        Improved lighting;

·        Playground enlargement and upgrade.

·        Additional car parking; and

·        Repositioning and widening of the road entry;

Financial / economic issues

The Eastfield Park Enhancement plan is a draft concept only. Any future works would be subject to Council’s established planning and budgetary processes.

Environmental / amenity issues

The draft concept plan included additional car parking to service the proposed community facilities and to cater for increased usage by both sporting groups and the general community.  The current one-way road to Bensons Oval would be widened to allow for two-way traffic.

 

A draft Landscape Plan was developed for the site, with the retention of open space and protection of native vegetation being a high priority.

 

The draft design indicated that some trees/vegetation may need to be removed. Should this occur, Council would be required to apply for a planning permit to remove the trees, and would ensure offset planting within Eastfield Park is undertaken as part of the future development of the Park. This would be in addition to the extensive natural enhancements proposed.  Any tree that is approved for removal would be subject to an inspection for potential habitat locations, including nests and hollows.  In the event that any active or potentially active habitat is identified a suitably qualified wildlife/habitat specialist would be engaged to instruct their recovery and protection.

 

Where possible, the trunks of large pine trees which are recognised as suitable for timber harvesting, would be integrated into the landscape design as features or habitat.  Where native trees require removal their timber would be located in adjacent bushland reserves for the provision of habitat.

 

Water sensitive urban design would see low scale garden beds built within the carparks, to retain and filter water before making its way to storm water drains and Tarralla Creek. Trees would be planted within these garden beds to break up the space and provide a green canopy, providing added benefits such as heat banks and urban cooling.


 

Social / community issues

The plan considered the needs of a number of key groups including community groups; sporting clubs; families; and general users of Eastfield Park.

 

The proposed plan includes lighting for the dog park, all sports grounds and car parks, as well as ambient lighting throughout the park (including walking tracks) to increase public safety.

Community consultation

The Eastfield Park Enhancement Plan draft concept community consultation period commenced on 28 May 2018 and closed on 15 July 2018.  Residents of surrounding streets received information about the Eastfield Park Enhancement Plan draft concept and community consultation via letter box drops. Community feedback on the draft concept was invited via surveys, both hard copy and on line, and a number of drop-in information sessions were arranged and held.

Conclusion

It is recommended that Council receives and notes the petition containing 560 signatures, relating to the Croydon Light Harness Club’s future with regard to the Eastfield Park Enhancement Plan draft concept.

 

The feedback received from the community regarding the Eastfield Park Enhancement Plan draft concept is currently being collated.  Council officers will consider the prayer of the petition and results of the feedback received on the Eastfield Park Enhancement Plan draft concept in a report to be presented to a future meeting of Council.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Eastfield Park Landscape Plan - Draft Concept

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That

1.       COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE PETITION containing 560 signatures, RELATING TO the ongoing presence of the croydon light harness club at eastfield park, croydon

2.       OFFICERS PREPARE A REPORT ON THE MATTER RAISED IN THE PETITION, AND IN RESPONSE TO THE GENERAL FEEDBACK RECEIVED IN RELATION TO THE PROPOSED eastfield park enhancement plan, FOR CONSIDERATION AT A FUTURE MEETING OF COUNCIL

3.       THE LEAD PETITIONER IS ADVISED ACCORDINGLY

 


DIRECTOR Operations, Assets & Leisure Adam Todorov

 

Capital Works Report: Fourth Quarter 2017/2018

Item 2

 

Purpose

To present the financial and operational status of major Capital Works projects for the final quarter of the 2017/2018 financial year.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable.

Background

Council, as part of its Adopted Budget 2017/2018, allocated $27.25M to Capital Works projects.  In addition, Council obtained external State and Federal grants totalling an additional $2.5M.

 

Capital Works programs status reports are prepared by management and reviewed monthly at the Capital Works Implementation Group (CWIG) and presented quarterly to the Audit and Risk Advisory Committee (ARAC).

 

Provided in this report is an overview of Capital Expenditure on Council’s major projects for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018.

 

The report also includes the $4.3M that was carried forward into the 2017/2018 financial year.

Issue / discussion

The following is a summary of the status of Council’s major construction project areas and financial position for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CAPITAL PERFORMANCE – TWELVE MONTHS ENDING 30 JUNE 2018

 

YTD

YTD

YTD

Forecast

Amount

Adopted

Forecast Budget

Actual *

Bud Var

Budget **

Carried Forward

Budget

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

Classification

Buildings1

8,328

4,841

3,488

8,328

1,369

4,630

Roads2

5,135

3,996

1,139

5,135

318

3,807

Footpaths and Cycleways3

2,622

2,879

(257)

2,622

(400)

2,745

Carparks4

854

754

100

854

16

445

Drainage5

1,578

1,484

94

1,578

(20)

2,440

Waste Management

72

40

31

72

22

50

Other Capital Roads & Drainage6

1,778

937

841

1,778

1,012

825

Recreational Leisure and Community Facilities7

2,939

2,442

497

2,939

213

2,446

Parks and Open Space8

3,792

2,327

1,465

3,792

1,264

2,121

Fixtures, Fittings and Furniture

46

37

10

46

6

60

Plant, Machinery and Equipment9

3,752

2,621

1,131

3,752

774

3,552

Computers and Telecommunications10

1,485

647

838

1,485

506

920

Property Sales

0

44

(44)

0

0

0

Building Renewal11

2,523

3,874

(1,351)

2,523

(800)

3,213

Total capital works

34,903

26,922

7,981

34,903

4,279

27,254

* YTD Actual expenditure includes Carried Forwards

** Forecast Budget expenditure includes Carried Forwards

 

Explanation of variations between forecast budget and adopted budget:

·        1 Buildings – The $3.7M variation between the adopted $4.6M and forecast $8.3M budgets is due primarily to:

-        $1.4M carried forward from 16/17, which includes: HE Parker Sporting Redevelopment ($359K); Town Park Floodlights ($269K); Public Toilet Improvement Program ($154K); Bedford Park Scout Hall ($150K); and Ringwood Lake Storeroom ($120K) projects;

-        $1.5M for HE Parker Sporting Pavilion Redevelopment ($450K of a total of $500k funded from the Federal government); and

-        $750k grant from Department Sport & Recreation for the HE Parker Multi Sports Complex

·        2 Roads – The $1.3M net variation between the adopted $3.8M and forecast $5.1M budgets is due primarily to:

-        $318K carried forward from 16/17 which includes: $100K Depot Paved Roadway; $100K for Heathmont Road Reconstruction; and $146K in the Roads to Recovery Program;

-        $387K Contribution from Yarra Ranges Council for the Roads to Recovery project at Lincoln Road;

-        $155K grant (of a total $1.2M) from the Federal Government (via the Victorian Department of Transport) for Heathmont Shopping Centre Access Improvement works;

-        $116K for Heathmont Road Indented Parking brought forward from 18/19 (Commercial Centres Upgrade Budget); and

-        $76K grant from VicRoads for Main Street Pedestrian Safety Improvements.

·        3 Footpaths & Cycleways – The $123K net variation between the adopted $2.7M and forecast $2.6M budgets is due primarily to:

-        $400K being allocated within the 17/18 financial year, but being completed and spent in the 16/17 financial year; and

-        $31K for Disability Footpath Access brought forward from 18/19.

·        4 Carparks – The $400k net variation between the adopted $0.4M and forecast $0.8M budgets is due primarily to:

-        $16K being carried forward from 16/17; and

-        $200K being brought forward for the Knaith Road Reserve Carpark from the 18/19 financial year (Commercial Centres Upgrade Budget).

·        5 Drainage – The $900K net variation between the adopted $2.4M and forecast $1.5M budgets is due primarily to $500K drainage works that were completed in 16/17 and brought forward from the 17/18 financial year.

·        6 Other Capital Roads and Drainage – The $975K net variation between adopted $825K and forecast $1.8M is due primarily to $1.0M carried forward from the 16/17 financial year, which relates to:

-        $578K Ringwood Metropolitan Activity Centre Improvements;

-        $118K Commercial Centres Upgrade Program;

-        $261K Street Lighting Improvements; and

-        $44K Street Furniture Renewal.

·        7 Recreational Leisure and Community Facilities – The $500K net variation between adopted $2.4M and forecast $2.9M budgets is due primarily to:

-        $213K carried forward from 16/17, which includes: $101K Dorset Golf Dam Desilting; $41K Sportsfield Lighting Renewal; and $41K Tarralla Creek Path & Land Acquisition;

-        $75K grant from Department Sport & Recreation for Belmont Park Lighting; and

-        $15K contributions each for Great Ryrie PS Netball Court Resurfacing and Manson Reserve Lighting.

·        8 Parks and Open Space – The $1.6M net variation between adopted $2.1M and forecast $3.7M budgets is due primarily to:

-        $1.3M carried forward from 16/17 which includes: $787K Croydon Town Centre; $165K East Ringwood Reserve Carpark & Landscaping; $121K Reserves Bridge Replacements; $91K Ringwood Lake Playspace; and $80K Ringwood Lake Masterplan.

-        $100K Grant for Croydon Town Square from the Department of Health & Human Services (for the Changing Places facility).

·        9 Plant, Machinery and Equipment – The $200K net variation between adopted $3.5M and forecast $3.7M budgets is due primarily to $774K carried forward from 16/17, which includes: $663K in Plant & Fleet and $123K Leisure Facilities Equipment Replacement.

·        10 Computers and Telecommunication – The $480K net variation between adopted $920K and forecast $1.4M budgets is due to $506K carried forward from the 16/17 financial year.

·        11 Building Renewal – The $700K net variation between adopted $3.2M and forecast $2.5M budgets is due partly to $800K allocated to 17/18 projects which have been completed and spent in 16/17, and to the budget being segregated to individual major facility improvement projects (ie, Croydon Sporting Pavilion, Bedford Park Scout Hall, Jubilee Park Sporting Pavilion, etc).

Financial / economic issues

CARRIED FORWARDS

Council has spent $26,964,612 (77%) of its forecast budget of $34,903,407 at the end of the 2017/2018 financial year, with $7,938,795 being carried forward into the 2018/2019 financial year.  A large proportion of these funds are due to ongoing major projects such as the Croydon Town Square Development, H E Parker Sporting Pavilion Redevelopment, Bill Wilkins Lodge Redevelopment and the Upgrade of Lincoln Road, Croydon.

 

PROJECT STATUS

The status of the individual projects at 30 June 2018 is provided as an attachment to this report.

 


CAPITAL WORKS YTD – EXPENDITURE (CUMULATIVE)

*YTD Actual expenditure includes Carried Forwards   

**Forecast Budget expenditure includes Carried Forwards and future years’ projects brought forward

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

Council has allocated $27.25M to Capital Works for 2017/2018, with $4.3M carried forward from 2016/2017. An additional sum of $2.5M was been received via State and Federal Government grants. Variations between adopted and forecast budgets are noted.

 

As at the end of June 2018, Council has spent approximately 77% of the total capital works budget.  Based on the current status of some major projects (including the Croydon Town Square development, HE Parker Multisports Complex redevelopment, HE Parker Sporting Pavilion redevelopment, and the Silcock Sporting Pavilion redevelopment), Council is carrying forward $7.9M into the 2018/19 financial year.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Carried Forwards from 2017/2018 to 2018/2019

2.

Capital Works Project Status at 30 June 2018

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE REPORT ON THE PROGRESS AND STATUS OF CAPITAL WORKS PROJECTS FOR THE PERIOD 1 JULY TO 30 JUNE 2018

  


DIRECTOR Strategy & Community Phil Turner

 

Maroondah Planning Scheme Amendment C104: Heritage Overlay 14 Wonga Road Ringwood and 46-48 Dickasons Road Heathmont-Exhibited Amendment

Item 1

 

Purpose

The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s adoption of Amendment C104 to the Maroondah Planning Scheme.

STRATEGIC POLICY ISSUES

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  An attractive, thriving and well-built community.

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an attractive community with high quality residential and commercial areas incorporating infrastructure that meets the needs and aspirations of all ages and abilities.   A diverse range of housing options are available and thriving activity centres provide a broad range of facilities and services that meet community needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

6.10 Develop and implement an urban form that enhances the desirable attributes of Maroondah to protect and value ridgelines, vegetation, neighbourhood character, local history and cultural heritage.

Priority Action 2018-2019:

One of the Council Plan’s priority actions 2017-2021 is to undertake a municipal wide review of Council’s neighbourhood character and heritage controls.

The Amendment is consistent with the following:

·        Ministerial Direction on the Form and Content of Planning Schemes under section 7(5) of the Planning and Environment Act 1987;

·        Ministerial Direction No. 9 – Metropolitan Planning Strategy (Plan Melbourne 2017-2050): Direction 4.4 Respect Melbourne’s heritage as we build for the future;

·        The directions and initiatives in the Metropolitan Strategy, as it will help to conserve a part of Maroondah’s and Melbourne’s heritage;

·        Ministerial Direction No 11 – Strategic Assessments of Amendments;

·        The objectives of the State Planning Policy Framework. Clause 15.11;

-        Plan Melbourne 2017-2050 Metropolitan Planning Strategy;

-        The Municipal Strategic Statement (MSS)- Clause 15.03-1 – Heritage conservation;

-        Clause 21.04 – Heritage;

Background

The Amendment proposes to introduce heritage controls to 14 Wonga Road Ringwood and 46-48 Dickasons Road Heathmont. These two properties were assessed as satisfying the necessary threshold for the inclusion of heritage controls.

 

The properties were nominated by their respective owners who are long- time residents of Maroondah.

 

Council’s Heritage Advisor assessed both properties, prepared heritage citations, advised they are of local significance and recommended that a heritage overlay be applied.

 

14 Wonga Road, Ringwood

 

The house at 14 Wonga Road, Ringwood was designed by James Earle in early 1952. Earle was working for architects Muir and Shepherd at the time. He was a notable designer of fine modernist residences, churches and schools and a key figure in municipal planning and landscape architecture in Victoria until retirement in 2007. The house is adapted to its sloping site and oriented north east toward hill and mountain views. It is a lightweight structure with a brick garage under one end, and is clad in stylish wide weatherboards mitred at the corners.

 

The House is significant for architectural and historical reasons at the Local level. It is of architectural significance as an early example of a Modernist house in Maroondah with a high level of intactness. It has historical significance as one of a small number of architect designed Modernist houses that form a minor but highly significant part of the massive post WW2 growth in the suburbs forming the City of Maroondah.

 

46-48 Dickasons Road, Heathmont

 

46-48 Dickasons Road, Heathmont is a simple, elegant rectangular building with a low-pitched gable roof of aluminium with wide eaves on the north and south sides. The house is in good condition and largely intact externally including the north facing entrance deck with steel balustrading and stairs down to the undercroft. The original deck on the south side has been extended sympathetically. Internally, there are minor modifications but the layout and detailing is mostly original.

 

The House is significant for architectural, historical and social reasons at the Local level.  The property is architecturally significant as fine, virtually intact example of a Modernist house in Victoria, and for its simple yet elegant design by notable architects Phyllis and John Murphy. Their residential work was considered “contemporary, elegant and timeless”.

It is historically significant as one of a small number of architect designed Modernist houses that form a minor but highly significant part of the massive post WW2 growth in the suburbs forming the City of Maroondah, and as a house designed by John and Phyllis Murphy.

 

The house and land are socially significant for its Conservation Covenant which protects Bush nature reserve, once part of the original site, now a community environmental resource, well known and regularly visited by friends’ groups, students and environmentalists.

 

The garden is also of aesthetic and historical significance as a decorative, blended native and exotic garden developed and curated by the original owners of the house, over a period of some 55 years.

 

A copy of the citations is included in Attachments 1; 2 and 3 of this report.

 

Authorisation Conditions

 

A request for authorisation under section 8a of the Planning and Environment Act 1987 was made by Council to the Minister for Planning on 9 November 2016. In a letter dated 24 March 2017, the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) advised that it authorised Council to prepare the Amendment subject to conditions, in particular, that the citations prepared in support of the Amendment must be included in the review and update of the 2003 Maroondah Heritage Study and that the review may be undertaken in stages.

 

Further information was also required in relation to the following:

·        Plans for the houses;

·        Clear reference to determining factors for the curtilages surrounding each house;

·        Any reference to the thematic history;

·        Historic information associated with the building; details of the conservation covenants, comments and desirability of tree controls;

·        For 46-48 comment on a suitable replacement material for the asbestos sheeting.

In a letter dated 19 May 2017, Council provided the additional information to the Department.

 

In a letter dated 29 March 2018, the Department advised that it was then appropriate for the Amendment to proceed to exhibition.  It also indicated that Council should:

·        Consider further addressing the issue of potential future subdivision of the sites and how the heritage aspect of the dwellings would be protected;

·        During the Amendment process, Council should demonstrate that there is sufficient strategic justification to apply the heritage overlay tree controls over all trees of the site, Council, should also consider whether specific trees should be nominated for their heritage significance and whether there should be exemptions which would enable specific trees to be removed without a permit.

In light of the Department’s conditions relating to the Amendment, and subsequent advice as to the timing for the additional information to address the issues, Council proceeded to exhibition of the Amendment. Of relevance, the citation for 46-48 Dickasons Road, Heathmont and the plans notating the significant trees have been updated to address the issues raised by the Department.

 

At is meeting on 22 August 2016 Council resolved to seek authorisation to prepare the Amendment.

 

The supporting documents to Amendment C104 are included in Attachment 4.

Issue / discussion

Following the advice from the Department to proceed to exhibition, the Amendment was advertised in accordance with the requirements of the Planning and Environment Act 1987.

 

No objections were received during the consultation process.

 

Council’s detailed response to the issues raised by the Department at the authorisation stage are outlined below:

·        Potential future subdivision of the sites and protection of heritage aspects.

-        The land at Lot 1 46 Dickasons Road is protected by a conservation covenant (the home block) which precludes its future subdivision. Lot 2 of 46-48 Dickasons Road was donated to the Victorian Conservation Trust (now Trust for Nature);

-        The purpose of the Covenant is to preserve the natural interest and beauty of the Lot 1 land and its value as a protective buffer for the Reserve;

-        The citation has been revised to clarify the effect of the conservation covenant and its restrictions on future subdivision of the land.

·        Strategic justification to apply the heritage overlay tree control.

-        The Department queried the heritage controls on the site should apply to all of the trees, especially considering that the site is also the subject to a Significant Landscape Overlay. It recommended that Council consider whether specific trees should be nominated for their heritage significance and whether there should be exemptions which would enable specified trees to be removed without the need for a permit;

-        The citation has been amended to indicate the horticultural significance at the local level of the Garden at Lot 1, 46 Dickasons Road Heathmont. The garden referred to as the Dexter’s arboretum in the initial citation prepared prior to exhibition, includes a range of shrubs and variously sized trees of notable interest, some rare. The garden is relatively uncommon in Maroondah and provides a unique suburban landscape setting of aesthetic and horticultural significance for the many native and exotic plantings listed in the “Tree and Garden Inventory, May 2018”. It is also of historical significance for its development by the original owners of the house over a period of 55 years;

-        The blended native and exotic garden has an attractive informal layout. It contains an extensive range of trees and shrubs, most having decorative form, foliage, or flowers. They range from those that have grown to be very large significant canopy trees, as in the case of the Scarlet Oak (Quercus coccinea) planted in the 1960’s and numerous Corymbia species, including Lemon Scented Gum (C. citrodora) and Spotted Gum (C. maculata), planted in the 1960’s and 70’s.  There are other examples of plants which have their own horticultural significance as they represent mature examples of these species, eg Crepe Myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica), planted in the 1960s; and native Coast Banksia (Banksia integrifolia) planted in the 1970s. It also contains a range of smaller trees and shrubs, such as the slow growing White Gum (Eucalyptus sp) planted in 1990, Camellias and Banksia Rose (Rosa banksiae 'Lutea') planted in the 1980s.

Attachment 1 includes the Garden Plan and Tree and Garden Inventory, May 2018 is attached.

Financial / economic issues

The cost of preparing the Amendment is included within Council’s existing budget.

Environmental / amenity issues

The Amendment will have a positive environmental impact on both properties proposed to be included within the Heritage Overlay.

Social / community issues

The social and economic effects of the Amendment will be positive as it will assist with conserving buildings and surrounds that are of local social and historical significance.

Community consultation

Public notification of this Amendment took place between 28 May 2018 and 2 July 2018 through the following methods:

·        A Notice in the Government Gazette; GG 22 on 31 May 2018;

·        Notice in Maroondah Leader, 29 May 2018;

·        Letters to relevant stakeholders;

·        Letters to prescribed Ministers;

·        Letters to relevant authorities including Melbourne Water, Trust for Nature Victoria;

·        Amendment documents were made available at Council offices, libraries and on Council’s website and Maroondah’s Have Your Say Portal.

Following public notification, no submissions were received.

Conclusion

The proposed introduction of the heritage controls will assist with the management of the places at 14 Wonga Road and Ringwood; and 46-48 Dickasons Road, Heathmont to ensure that their local heritage significance is protected. The Amendment has the support of both landowners with no objections received by Council.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Amendment C104 Adoption Citations Attachment 1 Council report

2.

Amendment C104 Adoption Plan of Dexter's Garden Attachment 2

3.

Amendment C104 Adoption Tree and Garden Inventory Attachment 3

4.

Amendment C104 Adoption Attachment 4

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council

1.       ADOPTS AMENDMENT C104 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE ATTACHED AND SUBMITS THE AMENDMENT TO THE MINISTER FOR PLANNING FOR CONSIDERATION AND APPROVAL

2.       Informs the property owners of 14 wonga road ringwood and 46-48 dickasonS road heathmont of Council’s decision

 


DIRECTOR Strategy & Community Phil Turner

 

Maroondah Affordable and Social Housing Policy

Item 2

 

Purpose

To seek formal Council adoption of the Maroondah Affordable and Social Housing Policy 2018 following a four-week period of public exhibition, undertaken in accordance with Council’s Community Engagement Policy 2015 and the Right to Make Submission (S.223) under the Local Government Act 1989 (“the Act”).

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  An attractive, thriving and well-built community

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an attractive community with high quality residential and commercial areas incorporating infrastructure that meets the needs and aspirations of all ages and abilities. A diverse range of housing options will be available and thriving activity centres will provide a broad range of facilities and services that meet community needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

7.5     Advocate and promote the provision of a diversity of affordable housing options to suit a range of lifestyle needs and life-stage requirements.

1.15   Advocate and promote the increased provision of affordable housing options in accessible locations.

7.6     Work in partnership to break cycles of poverty and socio-economic disadvantage, particularly within marginalised communities.

6.8     Encourage and support the provision of a diverse range of housing across Maroondah, that meets the needs of current and future residents.

6.7     Plan and facilitate the development of a community where everyone can live, work and play locally.

Priority Action 2018-2019:

Develop a Council policy position on affordable and social housing.

Background

One of the 2018/19 priority actions identified within the Council Plan 2017-2021 involves the development of an Affordable and Social Housing Policy. This new Policy was an identified action within the Maroondah Housing Strategy (2016), which acknowledged that Council has a role to play in the affordable and social housing space.

This new Affordable and Social Housing Policy has been prepared to help Council better understand affordable and social housing issues, establish closer relationships and ongoing sharing of information with the local service sector, and clarify Council’s policy position in responding to affordable and social housing issues.

To inform development of this Policy, Council commissioned SGS Economics and Planning to develop a discussion paper to canvass issues, policy options and practical steps that Council can take to effect change in the supply of social and affordable housing. The report considered a broad range of evidence on current challenges and the identification of a range of policy options.

In developing this Policy, Council consulted with key stakeholders through a range of interviews, focus groups and a Maroondah Affordable and Social Housing Forum. The outcomes from these engagement activities helped to inform the selected policy directions.

Issue / discussion

The background research and stakeholder consultation identified that:

·        There is a lack of suitable affordable accommodation for single persons in Maroondah;

·        There is a lack of public housing in the City of Maroondah compared to other regions;

·        Many people are on the waiting list for social housing and move in between shortterm accommodation options while waiting;

·        Services available for those at risk of homelessness or those who need support are not readily available and/or are not up to date;

·        The current Commonwealth tax system is having a detrimental effect on homelessness rates in Maroondah;

·        The negative perception of social housing in the local community often prevents affordable housing projects from getting off the ground;

·        There is a spectrum of policy options available in which Maroondah Council could potentially play in promoting social and affordable housing in the City.

 

From this work, a new Maroondah Affordable and Social Housing Policy 2018 was developed that highlighted four priority areas where Council can play a role, along with a number of more specific policy directions. These priority areas are:

1.       Facilitate effective planning direction and innovative support;

2.       Play a key facilitation and brokerage role to support the delivery of increased affordable and social housing in Maroondah;

3.       Work in partnership to advocate for increased investment and support for affordable and social housing;

4.       Apply a proactive approach to encouraging greater investment and supply of social and affordable Housing.

 

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

The City of Maroondah has traditionally been an affordable location. It has historically allowed key workers to live near their place of employment, older residents to age in place and young adults to purchase in the area. The incidence of housing stress and after housing cost poverty was comparatively favourable in a metropolitan context. Things have changed.

Analysis of historic census data by SGS indicates that 1 in 10 households in Maroondah require assistance to avoid serious or severe housing stress. Excluding those lowincome households in the City who already have the security of social housing, there are over 4,000 Maroondah households requiring significant housing assistance.

Whilst a permanent stock of social housing equating to 10% of all dwellings in Maroondah would enable the community to meet most needs, at present the current stock equates to approximately 2.5% of all dwellings in the municipality.

Community consultation

To inform development of the Draft Affordable and Social Housing Policy 2018, two focus groups were held at Maroondah City Council with various stakeholders including Community Housing Ltd – Eastern Metropolitan, Anchor Inc., EACH, Eastern Affordable Housing Alliance, Eastern Domestic Violence Service, Maroondah Community Assist, Safe Futures Foundation, Salvation Army Community Connections, Croydon Partners in Community Safety, EastCare Gateways Program (Salvos), Uniting Care Harrison, and Wesley Homeless and Support Service.

Interviews were undertaken with representatives from Housing Choices Australia, Common Equity Housing, Community Housing Institute Australia and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).

In addition, a major Affordable and Social Housing workshop was held in March 2018 with a wide range of local stakeholders that discussed priority issues in social and affordable housing, the drivers behind these issues, and the potential role of Council in addressing the problems in question.

Input from these focus groups, interviews and the forum helped to inform the development of the Policy and the establishment of associated policy directions.

At its meeting on 25 June 2018, Council resolved to place the Draft Affordable and Social Housing Policy 2018 on public exhibition for a period of 28 days, from 29 June to 27 July, in accordance with Section 223 of the Act.

 

The process involved:

·        Public exhibition of the Draft Maroondah Affordable and Social Housing Policy 2018 on Council’s website, Council Service Centres and local libraries.

·        Newspaper advertisements seeking comments or feedback from the community on the Draft Maroondah Affordable and Social Housing Policy 2018.

No submissions were received.

Conclusion

In summary, this Policy will enable Council to play an increased role in facilitating affordable and social housing. Preparation of the Policy has involved considerable background research and consultation. Following a period of public exhibition, Council adoption of this policy is sought.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Maroondah Affordable and Social Housing Policy - August 2018

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL ADOPTS THE MAROONDAH AFFORDABLE AND SOCIAL HOUSING POLICY 2018

 


DIRECTOR Strategy & Community Phil Turner

 

Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017/18) Progress Report - as at 30 June 2018

Item 3

 

Purpose

To provide an update on the progress of priority actions identified in the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017/18) as at 30 June 2018.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community.

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that consider the needs and aspirations of all ages and population groups. Council will provide strong and responsive leadership, ensuring transparency, while working with the community to advocate for and ‘champion’ local needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive, and accountable;

 

8.2     Ensure responsible and sustainable management of Maroondah’s resources, assets, infrastructure, and natural environment;

 

8.3     Foster a culture of innovation, cooperation, commitment, communication, and continuous improvement that positions Maroondah City Council as a leader in local government.

Priority Action 2018-2019:

Not Applicable

Background

The Council Plan 2017-2021 is Maroondah City Council’s key medium-term strategic document that sets key directions and priority actions to work towards the long-term community vision outlined in Maroondah 2040: Our future together.

 

The Council Plan plays a vital role in shaping Maroondah’s future over a four-year period. It identifies both challenges and opportunities for our community at local and regional level within the context of the community’s long term community vision, Maroondah 2040: Our future together. It also forms the basis for Council to make decisions regarding resources and priorities in response to community needs and aspirations.

 

The Council Plan is implemented through a service delivery planning process, and outcomes are measured and reported regularly. Achievements are reported back to Council and the community through the Maroondah City Council Annual Report at the end of each financial year.

Issue / discussion

Each year, Council presents to the community an updated set of key directions and priority actions for implementing the four-year Council Plan. This helps to ensure that the Council Plan continues to be aligned with Maroondah 2040: Our future together, the community’s long-term vision, and is responsive to community needs and expectations. The review also helps to ensure that all Council planning, strategies, policies, and processes take their lead from the key directions outlined within the Plan.

 

The Council Plan is divided into eight future outcome areas, each with a set of four-year key directions (strategies), annual priority actions, strategic indicators and supporting strategies and plans. The priority actions identified work towards the achievement of the key directions, and ultimately toward the outcomes and vision outlined in Maroondah 2040: Our future together.

 

The attached report identifies the progress made by Council this financial year in working towards the delivery of the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017/18) Priority Actions.

 

Some of the key Council Plan priority action achievements in 2017/18 have included:

·        Completion of the major upgrade to the playspace at Ringwood Lake Park;

·        Completion of the reconstruction of the sportsfield at Jubilee Park;

·        Completion of the installation of 21 CCTV cameras in Croydon Town Centre;

·        Development of a Gambling Policy, an Affordable and Social Housing Policy and a Gender Equity Policy;

·        Adoption of a Climate Change and Adaption Strategy;

·        Completion of design works for the $16.5m HE Park Multi Sports Complex;

·        Improvement of both pedestrian and vehicle access at Heathmont Shopping Precinct;

·        Completion of the design and commenced construction of the new Croydon Town Square.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

 

 

Community consultation

Council will report to the Maroondah community on the implementation of the Council Plan priority actions for 2017/18 in the Maroondah City Council Annual Report 2017/18. The Annual Report will also report on Council’s progress in relation to the community outcomes and key directions identified in Maroondah 2040: Our future together. The Annual Report is scheduled to be presented to Council in September 2018 before being released to the Maroondah community.

Conclusion

The attached report identifies that Council has made excellent progress during the financial year in the delivery of Council Plan priority actions for 2017/18.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1  2017/18) progress report 30 June 2018

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL notes the progress made towards the delivery of COUNCIL plan 2017/18 priority actions as at 30 june 2018

 


DIRECTOR Strategy & Community Phil Turner

 

Local Government Performance Reporting Framework - Quarter 4 Results, 2017/18

Item 4

 

Purpose

To provide a report of Council’s Local Government Performance Reporting Framework (LGPRF) service performance results for the 2017/18 full financial year (1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018).

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community.

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that consider the needs and aspirations of all ages and population groups. Council will provide strong and responsive leadership, ensuring transparency, while working with the community to advocate for and ‘champion’ local needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable;

 

8.2     Ensure responsible and sustainable management of Maroondah’s resources, assets, infrastructure and natural environment;

 

8.3     Foster a culture of innovation, cooperation, commitment, communication and continuous improvement that positions Maroondah City Council as a leader in Local Government.

Priority Action 2018-2019:

Not Applicable

Background

The LGPRF is a mandatory reporting system developed by Local Government Victoria which was introduced in 2014 to ensure all Victorian Councils are measuring and reporting on their performance in a consistent way.

 

The LGPRF is a State Government initiative aimed at ensuring transparency and accountability of the local government sector performance to ratepayers and to provide a meaningful set of information to the public.

 

The Framework is made up of service performance, financial performance and sustainability measures, along with a governance and management checklist. Together these components build a comprehensive picture of local government performance.

 

These measures are reported in Council’s Annual Report each year via the Report of Operations and Performance Statement sections as required by the Local Government (Planning and Reporting) Regulations 2014 and associated elements of the Local Government Act 1989.

 

These financial year results are publicly released on the Victorian Government’s ‘Know Your Council’ website in November each year. This site provides information on the sector and enables users to benchmark the relative performance of Councils on LGPRF indicators.

Issue / discussion

Maroondah City Council continues to monitor LGPRF indicator results on a quarterly basis for service performance indicators and annually for financial performance and sustainable capacity indicators.

 

A report that outlines LGPRF service performance indicator results for the full 2017/18 financial year (1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018) is attached to this Council Report.

 

The majority of indicators are within the ‘expected range’ as defined by the framework for the year. For the two indicators outside the expected range, the variation is a positive result.

 

Maroondah City Council will continue to monitor its performance against LGPRF indicators and report on its performance quarterly to ensure accountability and transparency.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

LGPRF service performance indicators for 2017/18 are presented in the attached report. These annual results will be published in Council’s Annual Report and on the Victorian Government ‘Know Your Council’ website in November 2018.

 

 

Attachments

1.

2017-18 LGPRF Service Performance Results - FULL YEAR

 

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That council notes the locAl government performance reporting framework service performance indicator results for the 2017/18 FINANCIAL yeAR

 


DIRECTOR Strategy & Community Phil Turner

 

Draft Ringwood Metropolitan Activity Centre Masterplan

Item 5

 

Purpose

To adopt the Draft Ringwood Metropolitan Activity Centre Masterplan for Community Consultation.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area: 

·        A prosperous and learning community;

·        A clean, green and sustainable community;

·        An accessible and connected community;

·        An attractive, thriving and well-built community;

Our Vision: 

Maroondah will be a vibrant and diverse city with a healthy and active community, living in green and leafy neighbourhoods which are connected to thriving and accessible activity centres contributing to a prosperous economy within a safe, inclusive and sustainable environment.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

2.2     Promote and leverage the strategic location of Ringwood as the Metropolitan Activity Centre for the outer eastern region;

 

2.3     Promote the diversification and localisation of Maroondah’s economy to stimulate job growth and encourage the community to work, shop and live locally;

 

4.3     Build the capacity of households and businesses to behave more sustainably, reduce waste and minimize consumption of natural resources;

 

4.10   Encourage increased green spaces within activity centres that link the built environment to the natural landscape;

 

4.13   Advocate for increased stormwater harvesting and greywater reuse by households and businesses;

 

5.1     Work in partnership to provide improved accessibility and safety for transport users across all modes;

 

5.4     Work in partnership to provide a safe and efficient integrated transport network that enhances livability, encourages a shift in travel modes and promotes Maroondah as a 20-minute city;

 

5.6     Advocate for and encourage the use of sustainable transport by enhancing local access to public transport, supporting behavior change initiatives and enhancing the pedestrian and cycling network, including the provision of on-road bicycle lanes;

 

6.1     Encourage high quality urban design that provides for a healthy, attractive and desirable built form;

 

6.2     Work in partnership to ensure development considers urban design principles that enhance the connection between the built environment and the natural environment;

 

6.3     Work in partnership to deliver distinctive and high quality architecture through the use of urban design guidelines and principles;

 

6.7     Plan and facilitate the development of a community where everyone can live, work and play locally;

 

6.8     Encourage and support the provision of a diverse range of housing across Maroondah, that meets the needs of current and future residents;

 

6.9     Encourage high density development in activity centres where there is access to high quality facilities, services and amenities;

 

6.10   Develop and implement an urban form that enhances the desirable attributes of Maroondah to protect and value ridgelines, vegetation, neighbourhood character, local history and cultural heritage.

Priority Action 2018-2019:

Update the Ringwood Metropolitan Activity Centre Masterplan

Background

Plan Melbourne (2017) is the State Government’s strategy to guide the growth of metropolitan Melbourne over the next 35 years and is built on a vision for Melbourne to “continue to be a global city of opportunity and choice”.

 

Plan Melbourne recognises Metropolitan Activity Centres (including Ringwood) and Employment Clusters as the cornerstone of establishing more jobs, housing and services in the suburbs. The ‘polycentric city’ concept encourages planning for more jobs close to where people live and vice versa.  Activity centres should be planned to provide good access to a range of major retail, community, government, entertainment, cultural and transport services, with a focus for higher density development.

 

Ringwood is identified as one of nine Metropolitan Activity Centres (MAC) in Plan Melbourne, and therefore is a focus for growth.

 

A masterplan aspires to create a framework to enable the delivery of a centre that has a diverse and well-connected communities that are rich in local jobs, transport, services, culture and affordable housing.  Protecting valuable natural and historical features, as well as using land more efficiently, are also important factors of masterplans.

 

In 2004 Maroondah City Council adopted the Ringwood Transit City Urban Design Masterplan (the 2004 Masterplan) which has facilitated development for more than 10 years.  The 2004 Masterplan identified Council’s vision for Ringwood and set in place a planning framework to encourage the realisation of its vision.

 

The 2004 Masterplan promoted Ringwood as a key commercial, retail, industrial and residential location, strategically located within the expansive transport network of eastern Melbourne, the gateway to the Yarra Valley.

 

The Masterplan has served Ringwood well over the past decade, with most actions being implemented.  It has helped to cement Ringwood’s role as a key outer eastern destination, providing for broad community needs, while retaining its natural assets and landscape character and identity. This success can be attributed to the consistent application of its vision and quality of its supporting guidelines.

Issue / discussion

A review of the 2004 Ringwood Transit City Masterplan has been undertaken.  The aim of the draft Masterplan is to reinforce development and economic growth that responds to a changing market and ensures the future success of the Ringwood MAC.

 

The draft Ringwood MAC Masterplan study boundary applies to all land shown in Figure 1.  It includes:

·        To the north, the Bypass from EastLink to Mt Dandenong Road;

·        To the east, Ringwood Lake and Bedford Park to Pitt Street;

·        To the south, Bedford Road, to Station Street then following the properties to the rear of Station Street through to Wantirna Road.  The boundary then follows the train line to New Street, then along Molan Street to Heatherdale Road (Municipal boundary);

·        To the West, the boundary follows Heatherdale Road to Maroondah Highway then the eastern side of EastLink through to the Bypass.

 

Figure 1: Ringwood Metropolitan Activity Centre Study Boundary

 

The Ringwood Metropolitan Activity Centre (MAC) benefits from:

·        Planning policy support for higher order commercial and employment uses;

·        Significant activity generators in Eastland Shopping Centre, Realm and Costco;

·        A large and established residential base within proximity of the centre;

·        Continued momentum in residential and retail development, supporting both short term and long term employment;

·        Unique town centre fundamentals including an established boulevard, diverse range of uses, walkable areas and other strong urban design characteristics.

The land use planning controls for Ringwood MAC have been effective in enabling an increase in housing development. The drivers for apartment development include: transport links, infrastructure, established housing prices and improved amenity, consistent with Plan Melbourne. There is a growing demand for apartments in Ringwood MAC.

 

The high level of capacity created through the significant investment in the public realm (eg Realm and the Town Square, Train Station Interchange) provides Council with the opportunity to emphasise the value of urban design. Strong urban design codes also leverage the existing high quality public realm core that has been developed within Ringwood MAC.

 

The high quality public realm and presence of a strong retail core, means that Ringwood MAC is increasingly attractive for both commercial and residential development.

 

The Draft Masterplan does not seek to make changes to the current land use patterns within Ringwood MAC.  Rather to enhance and improve the existing planning controls to continue to encourage quality development within Ringwood MAC.

The draft Ringwood MAC Masterplan includes detailed Urban Design Guidelines.  The objectives of these guidelines are:

·        To define the standard of urban design for Ringwood MAC that will contribute to wellbeing and liveability and ensure that future urban design is consistently high across Ringwood MAC;

·        To ensure the future development of Ringwood MAC in both the public and private realm has a focus on human scale, ensuring a positive experience when interacting with any aspect of Ringwood MAC;

·        To ensure the design and operation of development has positive environmental impacts;

·        To provide clear strategic direction and certainty of future development outcomes to both the local community and to investors;

·        To understand and respond to the unique characteristics of Ringwood MAC, the role they play, and how they function to support improved development outcomes;

·        To be sympathetic to Maroondah’s 2040 Community Vision that has a focus for a ‘clean, green and sustainable community’ and ‘an attractive and thriving and well-built community’;

·        To ensure the heritage values of Ringwood MAC are considered as the centre continues to grow.

The Draft Ringwood MAC Masterplan is attached in Attachment 1.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

The draft Ringwood MAC Masterplan is consistent with key directions included within the Maroondah Housing Strategy to plan for increased housing densities within the Ringwood MAC and to continue to protect neighbourhoods, ridgelines and vegetation.

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Community consultation and stakeholder engagement was undertaken in the preparation of this draft Masterplan and was done in two phases as follows:

 

Phase One:

·        To engage and consult with the Maroondah community to ensure the review of the Ringwood Masterplan is consistent with needs and aspirations;

·        To inform and educate around the role of the Metropolitan Activity Centre; background, progress to date and future opportunities and directions.

 

The community was engaged in three ways; a visual display; Vision exercise and an online survey. The engagement activities were advertised through Council’s website, Maroondah Focus and Maroondah City Council Facebook.

 

A visual display was at Realm and provided information on what has happened within Ringwood MAC since the 2004 Masterplan was developed.  The vision exercise asked the community to use three words to describe their vision for the Ringwood Metropolitan Activity Centre in 2030. The online survey also included a vision question and focused on the following themes:

·        Land use;

·        Urban design;

·        Transport and movement.

 

Phase Two

 

This phase focused on how the residential and commercial areas of Ringwood MAC will continue to develop over the next ten years to achieve quality urban environments. Two activities were conducted:

·        Interviews with major land owners within the study area;

·        Community mapping workshops were held with residents living in the study area.

 

Broader community consultation is proposed on the draft Ringwood MAC Masterplan from Monday 3 September 2018 to Monday 8 October 2018.

Conclusion

The Draft Ringwood MAC Masterplan is consistent with Plan Melbourne and Maroondah 2040 as a focus for growth.  This will enable Council to continue to protect neighbourhoods, ridgelines and vegetation outside of the activity centre.

 

The Draft Ringwood MAC Masterplan outlines how Council will work towards facilitating development and set in place a planning framework to implement into the Maroondah Planning Scheme.

 

It is accordingly recommended to adopt the Draft Ringwood MAC Masterplan for community consultation.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Draft Ringwood MAC Masterplan

 

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council adopts the draft ringwood metropolitan activity centre masterplan for community consultation

  


DIRECTOR Development & Amenity Andrew Fuaux

 

Smokefree Public Places - Proposed Local Law 14 (Amending Local Law)

Item 1

 

Purpose

To initiate the statutory procedures for Maroondah City Council to give notice of its intention to Publicly Exhibit for consultation, proposed Local Law No. 14 to amend Local Law No. 11 to insert a new clause that will prohibit smoking of tobacco products in certain prescribed public places being Ringwood Town Square and Croydon Town Square

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area: 

·        A safe, healthy and active community

·        A thriving and well-built community

·        An attractive community

·        An empowered community

Our Vision: 

Maroondah is a safe, healthy and active community with local opportunities provided for people of all ages and abilities to have high levels of social, emotional and physical wellbeing.

Maroondah is an empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that consider the needs and aspirations of all ages and population groups. Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparency, while working with the community to advocate for and ‘champion’ local needs.

Key Directions 2018 – 2019:

A safe, healthy and active community

1.6     Actively promote health and wellbeing principles and initiatives within the community

1.10   Embrace a preventative evidence-based approach to addressing issues of chronic and communicable disease, food safety, and public health

A thriving and well-built community

6.13   Coordinate and advocate for the increased utilisation, longevity and availability of fit-for-purpose public, private and not-for profit buildings and spaces that can act as key places for neighbourhood connection

 

An attractive community

6.6     Facilitate a vibrant day and night-time economy through development of high quality public spaces that incorporate diverse food, entertainment and cultural precincts

An empowered community

8.9     Create opportunities for shared decision making through active community involvement

8.10   Work in partnership to advocate for and champion the needs and aspirations of the community to other levels of government, service providers and the business sector

8.11   Foster a Council culture of collaboration and partnerships with individuals, community groups, businesses, service providers and other levels of government

Maroondah Health and Wellbeing plan 2017-2021

1.1.5  Develop a Tobacco Control Strategy that includes legislative requirements and health promotion activities such as investigating the feasibility of localised smoking bans in public places

In considering the issue of smoking in public places, it is important to note relevant legislation which creates an opportunity for local government to contribute to the safety of public places which support social health and wellbeing – especially those within Council control. Of particular interest are the Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008 and the Tobacco Act 1987.

Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008

The function of a Council under this Act is to seek to protect, improve and promote public health and wellbeing within the municipal district by:

(a)     Creating an environment which supports the health of members of the local community and strengthens the capacity of the community and individuals to achieve better health

(b)     Initiating, supporting and managing public health planning processes at the local government level

(c)     Developing and implementing public health policies and programs within the municipal district. (Public Health and Wellbeing Act 2008, Sect 24)

Background

Since 1 August 2017, under the Tobacco Act 1987, smoking is now banned in outdoor dining areas, including food premises, food fairs and community events. There is strong community support for these changes. This complements previous reforms banning smoking from areas such as playgrounds, some beaches, outdoor swimming pools, underage sporting events and entrances to schools and childcare centres.

 

Given the new requirements of the Act, Council has conducted consultation to gauge the community sentiment to establish Ringwood Town Square, and later, Croydon Town Square as smoke free public places.

 

In consultation undertaken in 2017, (with 1596 responses) over 90% of respondents supported Ringwood Town Square being smoke free.

 

In consultation undertaken in 2018, (with 700 responses), 86.3% of respondents supported Croydon Town Square being smoke free.

 

At an Ordinary Council meeting on 23 April 2018, Council endorsed the drafting of a proposed Local Law that prohibits smoking of tobacco products in certain prescribed public places being Ringwood Town Square and Croydon Town Square.

 

The proposed Local Law also includes a process that governs how Council can prescribe other public places where it determines smoking could be prohibited. Thereby allowing community input into areas of public interest that could be later prescribed as smoke free.

 

When reviewing, or developing a Local Law, it is industry best practice in Victoria to also develop and publish a Local Laws Community Impact Statement. This industry standard tool Local Government Victoria’s Guidelines for Local Laws Manual was used to consider and develop the Community Impact Statement (See Attachment 1).

 

The Community Impact Statement includes a range of information relating to the Council’s reasons for seeking to adopt the Local Law, how community and/or businesses may be affected by the Local Law, anticipated costs and what regulatory approach will be used.

Issue / discussion

Maroondah City Council’s Local Law 11 came into effect on 1 January 2016. 

 

The objectives of this Local Law are to:

·        provide for and assure equitable, orderly and enjoyable use by people of community facilities, including roads;

·        protect Council Property and other community assets from loss or unnecessary or avoidable damage;

·        support provision by Council of a safe, clean and healthy environment in areas under its control and management; and

·        provide generally for the peace, order and good government of the Municipal District.

 

The Proposed Local Law 14 (General Amendment) (See Attachment 2) will amend Council’s current Local Law 11. These amendments include changes to:

·        Clause 6.1 – to insert new definitions in relation to tobacco as per the Tobacco Act;

·        Clause 39A – a new clause that details the parameters of the smoking ban; and

·        Schedule 2 – a new schedule that details in two parts: the prescribed smoke-free areas by plan layout (see Attachment 3 and 4) and the guidelines for prescribing a smoke free area.

Financial / economic issues

The potential cost implications could include:

·        The design, development and installation of signage and butt out bins.

·        The designation of a safe and comfortable area for those people wanting to smoke where applicable.

·        Staff resources for the development and presentation of community/traders’ educational sessions. This is already incorporated in the day to day business.

·        Development, design and printing of educational materials.

·        Media releases and positive messaging.

 

The introduction of a designated smoke free area in both Ringwood and Croydon Town Square and other public places, in support of other positive health promotion initiatives have the potential to impact on smoking rates.

 

This would suggest that illnesses/disease connected with smoking would decrease, providing a positive financial impact on the overall health system and economy.

Environmental / amenity issues

The potential of increased cigarette butt litter has been considered.

Social / community issues

Smoke-free laws are good for business. Objective, peer-reviewed studies have consistently found that smoke-free laws have a neutral or positive impact on businesses, including those in the hospitality or catering sector.

 

This is also reflected in the results of Council’s recent consultations, whereby the majority of respondents indicated they would be more likely to visit, shop or attend events in both Town Squares if they were smoke free.

Community consultation

In consultation undertaken in 2017, (with 1596 responses) over 90% of respondents supported Ringwood Town Square being smoke free.

 

In consultation undertaken in 2018, (with 700 responses), 86.3% of respondents supported Croydon Town Square being smoke free.

 

Consultation activities included, an online survey for community and businesses, direct engagement activities and Facebook posts.

A drop-in session was held at Realm and was open to businesses in Ringwood Town Square to provide any feedback, support, or concerns they may have about the proposal.

 

Meetings with Eastland (QIC), Realm, Croydon Main Street Traders Association and Council officers have occurred regarding the proposal.

 

In developing the Local Law, undertaking Public Exhibition will be required for a period of at least four (4) weeks. As part of exhibiting the proposed Local Law a formal submission process will be available in accordance with the legislative requirements prescribed under section 223 of the Local Government Act 1989.

 

However, the community consultation process for the proposed Local Law and the submission process will include:

·        Public exhibition of the proposed Local Law 14 and the Local Law Community Impact Statement on Council's website and available for viewing at the City Offices, Braeside Avenue Ringwood, at Council's Service Centre in Croydon and Realm.

·        Advertisements in the Age and Maroondah Leader.

·        Individual letters to QIC and businesses in Ringwood Town Square, Croydon Main Street area.

·        Drop in sessions for businesses in the area adjacent to Ringwood and Croydon Town Squares.

Council will publish a public notice calling for written submissions in relation to the proposed Local Law. Those submissions will then be considered by Council as part of the formal consultation process.

Conclusion

Council has an opportunity to establish an innovative position, with an important health promotion message through the introduction of a Local Law banning smoking in Ringwood Town Square and the soon to be completed Croydon Town Square.

 

The amendments to Local Law 11 as outlined within the proposed Local Law 14 (General Amendment) aims to provide a mechanism for Council to manage public places to enhance their enjoyment by the general public, as well as enhancing the vibrant, outdoor dining experience as highlighted in Council’s strategic objectives.

 

These actions will also aim to embed positive healthy behaviours within the community over a period of time by utilising a balance of local law, community development and education activities.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Community Impact Statement - Smoke free public place - July 2018

2.

Amending Local Law 14 - Smokefree public places - draft - July 2018

3.

Schedule 2 A.1 - Local Law - Ringwood Town Square - Smoke Free area

4.

Schedule 2 A.2 - Local Law - Croydon Town Square Smoke free area

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council

1.       ACting under section 111 of the local government act 1989 (‘the act’) gives notice of its intention to make a local law in the form of the draft local law no. 14 attached to this report (‘the proposed local law’) for the purposes of amending the current local law no. 11

2.       provides public notice of its intention in the age and maroondah leader newspapers seeking submissions on the proposed local law in accordance with sections 119 and 223 of the act

3.       promotes its intention via council website, social media and direct mail inviting any person to make a written submission

4.       notes that a copy of the proposed local law will be on public exhibition at the city offices, braeside avenue ringwood, customer service centres, realm and council’s website

5.       in accordance with section 223 of the act

i.        appoints a committee comprising of councillors …………., …………… and …………………… to hear any person wishing to be heard in support of their submission on a date to be determined

ii.       Shall consider all written submissions at a subsequent meeting of council, including a written report on the proceedings of any committee hearing conducted, following which it will determine whether or not to make local law no.14

6.       authorises the director DEVELOPMENT and amenity to undertake the administrative procedures necessary to enable council to carry out its functions under section 223 of the act in relation to this matter