2014 Maroondah Logo RGB.jpg

 

 

Councillor

(as addressed)

 

 

The next Council Meeting will be held in the Council Chamber, Braeside Avenue, Ringwood, on Monday 25 June 2018, commencing at 7:30pm and your presence is requested.

 

 

Yours faithfully

SKozlows.jpg

 

Steve Kozlowski

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

Note:

This meeting is being streamed live on the internet and recorded.

Every care is taken to maintain privacy and attendees are advised they may be recorded.

 

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Council Chamber
is fitted with a Hearing Aid Induction Loop

 

Switch Hearing Aid to ‘T’ for Reception

 

City Offices

Braeside Avenue, Ringwood, 3134

Postal

PO Box 156, Ringwood 3134

DX 38068, Ringwood

Telephone

1300 88 22 33

 

 

Facsimile

Email

Web

 

Service Centres

Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS): 131 450

National Relay Service (NRS): 133 677

(03) 9298 4345

maroondah@maroondah.vic.gov.au

www.maroondah.vic.gov.au

 

Croydon: Civic Square

REALM: 179 Maroondah Hwy, Ringwood

 


 


ORDER OF BUSINESS

1.       Prayer

2.       Acknowledgment of Country

3.       Apologies  

4.       Declaration of Interests

5.       Confirmation of Minutes of the Ordinary Council Meeting held on Monday 21 May 2018.

6.       Public Questions

7.       Officers’ Reports

Director Corporate Services

1.       Attendance Report                                                                                                    5

2.       Reports of Assembly of Councillors                                                                         7

3.       Councillor Representation Reports                                                                        10

4.       Outcomes of Maroondah Motions to the Municipal Association of Victoria State Council Meeting                                                                                                      12

5.       Consideration of Submissions - Proposed Sale of Discontinued Right of Way at Rear 2-42 Grey Street Ringwood East                                                                            15

6.       Waste Management - Product Stewardship - Department of the Environment and Energy Submission                                                                                                 20

7.       Eastern Regional Libraries Corporation February - April 2018 Report on the Provision of Library Services                                                                                                  23

Director Operations, Assets & Leisure

1.       Capital Funding for Committees of Council 2018/2019                                         34

2.       Capital Funding for Community Groups 2018/2019                                               37

Acting Director Strategy & Community

1.       Maroondah Climate Change Risk and Adaptation Strategy 2018/19-2021/22      41

2.       Draft Maroondah Gambling Policy                                                                         48

3.       Draft Affordable and Social Housing Policy                                                           52

4.       Local Government Community Satisfaction Survey Results 2018                        56  

8.       Documents for Sealing

1.       Letter Under Seal - Recognition of 2018 Queen's Birthday Honours                    59

2.       Letter Under Seal - Maroondah Photographic Society - 60th Anniversary            60  

9.       Motions to Review   

10.     Late Item

11.     Requests / Leave of Absence

12.     In Camera

Director Operations, Assets & Leisure

1.       Tender Evaluation Report - Contract 20880 Provision of Programmed Street Tree Management Services

2.       Tender Evaluation Report - Contract 20886 Provision of Pit & Pipe Cleaning Services  

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Attendance Report

Item 1

 

Purpose

To provide an opportunity for Councillors to report on Council activities undertaken since the last Ordinary Meeting of Council and forthcoming ward activities.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

Not Applicable

Issue / discussion

It is intended that the Mayor and Councillors be given the opportunity to present a verbal or written report updating Council on the activities they have undertaken in their role as Councillors and forthcoming ward activities.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

It is appropriate that Councillors formally report to Council upon the activities they have undertaken in their role as Councillors.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE REPORTS AS PRESENTED BY

COUNCILLORS

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Reports of Assembly of Councillors

Item 2

 

Purpose

To present the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings at the City Offices Ringwood, usually two weeks prior to the formal Council Meeting, and to note the issues discussed.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

An Assembly of Councillors, as defined under the Local Government Act 1989 [s.3], is a planned or scheduled meeting, comprising at least five (5) Councillors and one (1) member of Council staff, that considers matters that are intended or likely to be:

 

·        the subject of a decision of the Council; or

·        subject to the exercise of a delegated function, duty or power of Council

Examples of an Assembly of Councillors may include:

 

·        Councillor Briefings (which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings),

·        On-site inspections,

·        Consultative Meetings with residents, developers, consultants,

·        Panel Hearings conducted under s223 of the Act,

·        Meetings with local organisations, Government Departments, statutory authorities, and local politicians

Issue / discussion

As part of decision making processes at Maroondah, it is essential that Councillors are briefed on a range of issues which come before Council for consideration.  As a means of providing this information, Assembly of Councillors briefings are conducted.

 

Assemblies are also attended by Council Officers, and sometimes other specific advisors, to provide Councillors with a detailed knowledge and understanding of issues under consideration to a level of detail that would inhibit timely decision-making, that would not be possible in an open Council meeting, where decision-making related debate is governed by strict meeting procedures.

 

The intent of this report is to present the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings, and to note the items discussed.  This information is already available to the public upon request in accordance with the Local Government Act [s.80A].

 

This report and attachments formally table the information items previously covered by Councillors.

 

The ‘Public Record’ of the Assembly of Councillors briefings held on 21 May 2018 and 4 June 2018 is attached for information.

 

The items contained therein were noted.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

Assembly of Councillors briefings are important forums for advice and discussion, on what are often complex issues facing the municipality, in the lead up to formal decisions being made by Councillors at Council Meetings.  At Assemblies, or outside them, Councillors also have the opportunity of requesting additional information to assist in the decision making process.

 

It is appropriate that the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings at the City Offices Ringwood, usually two weeks prior to the formal Council Meeting, be noted at a formal meeting of Council.


 

 

Attachments

1.

2018 May 21 - Assembly of Councillors Public Record

2.

2018 June 04 - Assembly of Councillors Public Record

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE PUBLIC RECORD OF THE ASSEMBLY OF COUNCILLORS BRIEFINGS HELD ON 21 May 2018 and 4 JUne 2018

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Councillor Representation Reports

Item 3

 

Purpose

To receive and note the following meeting minutes.

·        Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee Meeting (MDAC) held on 17 May 2018

·        Metropolitan Local Government Waste Forum Meeting (MLGW) held on 10 May 2018

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable.

Background

As part of Council's commitment to the principles and practice of good governance, it is appropriate that Councillors and the Community are formally updated on the actions and activities of the various organisations bodies/advisory groups upon which it is represented.

Issue / discussion

Council is represented on numerous Boards and Organisations. Appointments are made annually by Council at the commencement of the new Mayoral term.

 

Cr Spears and Dib are Council’s representatives at the Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee (MDAC) Meeting*.

 

Cr Symon is Council’s representative at the Metropolitan Local Government Waste (MLGW) Meeting*.

 

*Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group (MWRRG) to correct the attendance list to reflect Cr Symon was in attendance rather than Cr M Macdonald.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

 

Not Applicable

 

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

 

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

It is appropriate that Councillors and the Community are formally updated on the actions and activities of the various organisations bodies/advisory groups upon which Council is represented.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee Meeting Minutes - 17 May 2018

2.

Metropolitan Local Government Waste Meeting Minutes - 10 May 2018

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES the following MINUTES

1.       Maroondah Disability advisory committee (MDAC) meeting held on 17 May 2018

2.       Metropolitan local government waste (MLGW) meeting HELD ON 10 MaY 2018

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Outcomes of Maroondah Motions to the Municipal Association of Victoria State Council Meeting

Item 4

 

Purpose

To consider the outcomes of motions submitted by Council to the Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) State Council Meeting held on Friday 18 May 2018.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose in this report.

 

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community.

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs.

 

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

 

8.1       Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable.

Background

The Municipal Association of Victoria State Council Annual Meeting was held on Friday 18 May 2018 with Council having previously resolved to submit two motions.

 

The MAV is one of the Victorian local government sector peak body associations and together with local members of parliament, provides significant advocacy to both State and Federal Governments on behalf of Maroondah residents and ratepayers. 

Issue / discussion

The two motions submitted from Maroondah together with the result of the deliberations of the State Council, are as follows:

1.         Container Deposit Scheme (consolidated motion) – Carried 89% in favour; and

2.         Tiny Houses – Seeking Support Planning Changes Support Housing Affordability and Diversity – Carried 98% in favour.

The motions passed by the State Council Meeting are identified below:

 

Motion 1:- Container Deposit Scheme

 

(Consolidated by MAV) Submitting Councils: Maroondah City Council; Mitchell Shire Council; Monash City Council; and Yarra City Council.

 

Resolution: - That the Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) advocate for the Victorian Government to introduce a container deposit scheme and as part of that advocacy:

·                Promote the benefits that such a scheme would provide to the community;

·                Investigate and share learnings from the implementation of container deposit schemes in other states including, most recently, New South Wales; and

·                Pursue the option for local government to be able to set up return schemes should they choose to do so.

 

Motion 2:- Tiny Houses – Seeking Support Planning Changes Support Housing Affordability and Diversity

 

Resolution: - That the Municipal Association of Victoria State Council urges the state government to amend the Victorian planning provisions to better support small affordable housing as it would make a significant contribution to the policy aspirations of plan Melbourne and homes for Victorians

economic issues

Refer to rationale as highlighted under Issue / Discussion.

Environmental / amenity issues

Refer to rationale as highlighted under Issue / Discussion.

Social / community issues

Refer to rationale as highlighted under Issue / Discussion.

Community consultation

Council, through various forums, consultations and strategies, has engaged the Maroondah community regarding these various issues. 

Conclusion

The two motions, indicates the willingness of Council to advocate in such forums to other spheres of government on behalf of residents and ratepayers, in addition to demonstrating Council’s continued leadership on issues within the sector. 

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT COUNCIL NOTES THE OUTCOME OF THE TWO MOTIONS SUBMITTED BY COUNCIL THAT WERE THE SUBJECT OF CONSIDERATION AND DEBATE AT THE MUNICIPAL ASSOCIATION OF VICTORIA STATE COUNCIL MEETING HELD ON 18 MAY 2018.

 

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Consideration of Submissions - Proposed Sale of Discontinued Right of Way at rear 2-42 Grey Street Ringwood East

Item 5

 

Purpose

To consider the submissions received in response to Council’s notification of its proposal to sell the discontinued right of way (DROW) at the rear 2-42 Grey Street Ringwood East.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community.

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered. Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes, and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs.

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

8.1 Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive, and accountable.

8.2 Ensure responsible and sustainable management of Maroondah resources, assets, infrastructure, and natural environment.

Background

1.       Between October 2015 and February 2016, Council received numerous requests from property owners interested in purchasing the DROW in Grey Street and Eastfield Road Ringwood East.

 

2.       In November 2016, letters were sent to all abutting property owners in Grey Street and Eastfield, seeking their expression of interest in purchasing the land at the rear of their property.

 

3.       Where dual interest was expressed for the same parcel of land, further letters were sent to those owners requesting them to provide a once only bid, over the market value of $350 per sqm of land as provided by Council’s contract Valuers, Westlink Consulting Pty Ltd.

 

4.       Successful applicants in purchasing the DROW are listed as follows with the corresponding property numbers, as per Council’s report of 16 October 2017;

 

-        Eastern Health owned and leased properties – No’s. 2, 2/4, 6, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, and 22 Grey Street – combined total of $215,800 (exclusive of GST), based on 8 x $19,600, 1 x $30,000, 1 x $29,000.

-        Eastfield Road property owners – No’s. 9, 25, 33, 35, and 2/41-43 – combined total of $162,201 (exclusive of GST), based on 1 x $71,301, 1 x $31,050, 2 x $19,600, 1 x $20,650.

-        Grey Street property owners – No’s. 26, 36, and 2/38 – combined total of $108,300 (exclusive of GST), based on 1 x $69,100, 2 x $19,600.

5.       At its meeting held on 16 October 2017, Council resolved to give public notice pursuant to section 189 of the Local Government Act 1989 (Act), of its proposal to sell the discontinued right of way at the rear of 2-42 Grey Street Ringwood East to the interested property owners.

 

6.       In accordance with section 223 of the Act, a notice publishing Council’s resolution of its intent to sell, was published in ‘The Age’ on 9 February 2018. Close of submissions was on Friday 9 March 2018.

 

7.       The notice was made available at Council’s Customer Service areas, Croydon, and Ringwood Libraries, and was displayed on Maroondah’s website.

 

8.       Letters of the notification and a copy of the advertisement, were sent to all adjoining property owners to the discontinued right of way.

 

9.       Private property sales during this process included;

 

-        30 Grey Street – new prospective owners have been approached seeking their expression of interest in purchasing the land. They declined the offer to purchase.

-        2/29 Eastfield Road – new owners were approached and indicated that they were unaware of their rear fence being incorrectly placed. They are reluctant to purchase the land, due to the price, including erecting a new fence as per their title boundary.

Council officers will continue to have discussions with both of these owners.

 

Issue / discussion

Written submissions for the proposed sales of the discontinued right of way were received from:

·        7 Eastfield Road – written by the owners’ daughter on her father’s behalf. The DROW has been enclosed within the property.

·        15 Eastfield Road – did not provide an offer bid at the time of the request.

·        2/27 Eastfield Road – offer bid provided was lower than the offer received from the owners of 26 Grey Street.

·        34 Grey Street – did not express an interest at the time of the sale period.

 

In line with Council’s statutory obligations, the submissions hearing was held on Wednesday 4 April 2018 at 7 pm in the Council Chamber chaired by Mayor Cr Nora Lamont.

 

Issues raised at the Submissions Hearing by the submitters are as follows:

 

·        7 Eastfield Road – the daughter of the owner attended the hearing on behalf of her elderly father advising;

-        Owner has maintained and fenced the land since 1964 as a result of Council not maintaining the land.

           Officer comment;

-        Council appreciates the owner has taken pride and care of this section of the  DROW over many years. Unfortunately, Council has no written documentation agreeing to this arrangement or agreeing to any obligations relative to the owner purchasing this DROW into the future. Eastern Health were the highest bidders for this abutting DROW.

·        15 Eastfield Road – a representative on behalf of the owner attended the hearing and outlined the following points;

-        The owner originally requested to purchase the land in October 2015, to protect the significant trees.

-        Trees were removed from the land by Eastern Health without applying for permits.

-        Owners decided not to submit a bid offer when requested, due to the trees having already been removed – April 2017.

-        Concern of the multi-level carpark planned by Eastern Health to be built at 8 metres from the boundary fence.

-        Request to purchase the land at 3 times market value to ensure that the carpark is set 8 metres from the boundary fence.

             Officer comment;

-        Council wrote to all owners in November 2016 to gauge their interest after having received several requests from owners, including Eastern Health, to purchase the land.

-        Eastern Health were fined for the removal of trees without applying for a planning permit at the time.

-        Eastern Health’s proposal is to utilize the 3 metres of DROW to plant trees at the rear of the carpark.

-        Eastern Health were the highest bidders for the abutting DROW.

·        2/27 Eastfield Road – the owner of this property spoke on the following points;

-        The sale of the land solely to 26 Grey Street is an unfair outcome, as the land should be divided equally between both properties.

-        26 Grey Street have had sole use of the land not owned by them for 20 years.

-        Council to reconsider offer to purchase.

Officer comments;

-        Unfortunately, the land cannot be divided equally between the 2 property owners as an easement exists within the land.

-        There have been new owners at 26 Grey Street since February 2017.

-        The amount offered was out bided by the owner of 26 Grey Street.

·        34 Grey Street – the owner of this property spoke on the following points;

-        At the time of the ‘Expression of interest’ sale process, the owner was not in a position to respond to Council’s letter, however was in a better financial situation 4 months later.

-        More time should have been allowed to express an interest to purchase the land, so they could now be included in the bid process.

-        Concerns regarding the pine trees longevity in the DROW in which they have been maintaining for 20 years.

-        Request to purchase the land.

          Officer comments;   

-        The 8 week time frame was given to express an interest to purchase is part of a standard sale process and considered reasonable for these properties.

-        No response was received through the ‘Expression of interest’ sales period.

-        Canopy trees are protected under Planning Permit conditions.

-        The opportunity to purchase has expired under the terms of the sale of these properties.

-        The owners of 35 Eastfield Road were the highest bidders to this adjoining DROW.

                                

Financial / economic issues

The resources associated with the management of Council’s land asset portfolio are contained within the current budget.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

 

Community consultation

Council has complied with both the statutory requirements as per section 189 and 223 of the Act, and with Council’s Public Exhibition Policy, and is now in a position to authorise officers to undertake the required procedures to finalise the sale of the DROW.

Conclusion

This has been a highly complex property matter with many stakeholders involved in equitably resolving purchase and use of the various parcels contained with the DROW. Council has applied all its legislative obligations as well as Consultation Policy Principles and Procedures. Having considered the submissions received, Council is in a position to proceed with sale of land to the successful property owners as outlined above.

 

 

Attachments

1.

DROW Grey St/Eastfield Rd - Detailed map for Council Report

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Having undertaken Public Consultation pursuant to Section 189 and 223 of the local government ACT 1989, and Council’s Public Exhibition Policy for statutory notification, Council;

1.       proceeds to sell the discontinued right of way at the rear of 2-42 Grey Street to the property owners of Grey street and Eastfield ROAd Ringwood East as follows;

i.        No. 2, 2/4, 6, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 26, 30, 36, 2/38 grey street ringwood east

ii.       No. 9, 25, 2/29, 33, 35, 2/41-43 eastfield road ringwood east

2.       sells each portion of the discontinued right of way as per the agreed value as outlined in the background section of this report

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Waste Management - Product Stewardship - Department of the EnviRonment and Energy Submission

Item 6

 

Purpose

The purpose of this report is to update Councillors on a submission developed by Maroondah City Council to the Australian Government Department of the Environment and Energy regarding the Review of the Product Stewardship Act 2011 (the Act). The purpose of the submission is to provide Maroondah’s view on the matter and assist in ensuring ongoing effectiveness of the Act. This Act review is the first one for this Act since its commencement in 2011 and includes the National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme (NTCRS)-consultation paper.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A clean, green and sustainable community.

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah is a leafy green community with high levels of waste diversion and sustainable approaches to infrastructure development, urban design and management of natural resources. Our community is resilient and has the knowledge, capacity and resources to make sustainable lifestyle choices.

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

Provide leadership and adopt sustainable innovative approaches to limit consumption, prevent litter, reduce waste to landfill and encourage reuse and recycling of resources.

Build the capacity of households and businesses to behave more sustainably, reduce waste and minimise consumption of natural resources.

Background

Product stewardship is an approach to managing the impacts of different products and, materials. It acknowledges that the key stakeholders are those involved in producing, selling, using, and disposing of products and that all have their role to play in ensuring that the products are managed to reduce their overall impact throughout their lifecycle, on the environment and on human health and safety. Product stewardship schemes also assist in internalising the environmental costs involved in managing products throughout their lifecycle resulting in producers and consumers being incentivised to use resources in more effective and efficient way.

 

The Act was introduced as a framework that assists in effectively managing these objectives. The Act is now being reviewed in accordance with the sunset clause. As a result of the review process, a consultation paper has been issued by the Department of Environment and Energy that focuses mainly on 5 key terms of reference points and they are:

 

·        The extent to which the objects of the Act are being met and whether they remain appropriate.

·        The effectiveness of the accreditation of voluntary product stewardship schemes and the Minister’s annual product list in supporting product stewardship outcomes.

·        The operation and scope of the NTCRS.

·        The interaction of the Act with other Commonwealth, state and territory and local government legislation, policy, and programs.

·        International and domestic experience in the use of product stewardship to deliver enhanced environmental, social, and economic outcomes through product design, dissemination of new technologies and research and development.

The consultation paper correctly identifies that local government does play a crucial role in the waste and resource recovery system and as such, their input to the consultation piece is considered extremely important.

 

Issue / discussion

The matter of discussion is the Review of the Product Stewardship Act 2011, including the NTCRS. Submissions to this review are to be submitted via email to the Australian Government Department of Environment and Energy by the 29 June 2018. The Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) has also issued a draft submission for Council feedback and consideration. The preparation of the Maroondah City Council submission has considered this paper, and generally is aligned with the views within that paper (attached).

 

As part of developing the submission, the key points of note that were considered, were the following:

·        Whether the matters listed in the consultation paper should be considered in the Review;

·        Based on the Terms of Reference outlined in the paper, what matters Maroondah would like to see addressed in the Review;

·        Which matters we may consider of highest priority;

·        How priority matters may be addressed; and

·        Any community feedback in relation to the Act Review.

Financial / economic issues

Not applicable.

 

Environmental / amenity issues

The review of the Act will assist in ensuring a better future in terms of managing the impacts of different products and materials on the environment.

Social / community issues

Not applicable.

Community consultation

There has been some public feedback on what some individuals in the community believe is important to consider as part of the review of the Act.

Conclusion

Council endorse the submission paper to ensure Council has provided technical specialist advice into the Review process from a Local Government perspective and hopefully assist the Federal Government frame an Australian-wide legislative product stewardship environment using the Product Stewardship Act going forward to improve sustainability outcomes by reducing the impacts of products and materials on the environment and on human health and safety going forward.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Product Stewardship Act Review - Maroondah Submission - June 2018

2.

MAV 2018 - Product Stewardship Act review - draft MAV submission

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council endorseS the maroondah city council submission to the product stewardship act 2011 review and that it submits maroondah city council’s response by the closing date of 29 june 2018.

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Eastern Regional Libraries Corporation February - April 2018 Report on the Provision of Library Services

Item 7

 

Purpose

To outline the activity of this service for this period, given the significant partnership and service to Maroondah residents, ratepayers and visitors.

Strategic / policy issues

The Council Plan 2017-2021 provides the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report which has been developed from the Maroondah 2040 Our Future Together Community Consultation process.

Outcome Areas:

 

A safe, healthy and active community

A prosperous and learning community

A vibrant and culturally rich community

A clean, green sustainable community

An accessible and connected community

An attractive, thriving and well-built community

An inclusive and diverse community

A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision: Maroondah will be a vibrant and diverse city with a healthy and active community, living in green and leafy neighbourhoods which are connected to thriving and accessible activity centres contributing to a prosperous economy within a safe, inclusive and sustainable environment.

Key Directions 2017-2021:

1.3       Promote and facilitate safer cultures relating to issues of alcohol, drugs, tobacco, gambling, child abuse and family violence.

1.5       Facilitate the provision of affordable, accessible and responsive services, resources and initiatives that support the physical and mental health and wellbeing of the community.

1.6       Actively promote health and wellbeing principles and initiatives within the community.

2.15     Facilitate and encourage the provision of world-class life-long learning opportunities in Maroondah, from early learning through to adult and tertiary levels.

2.17     Facilitate and encourage places, spaces and programming that provide for a third place of community connection beyond home and work.

3.5       Support and celebrate the unique cultures of emerging communities in Maroondah.

 

Background

Maroondah City Council's library services are provided by the Eastern Regional Libraries Corporation (ERLC).  As part of a Regional Library Agreement, ERLC provides library services also to Knox City and Yarra Ranges Councils. The estimated population of its Member Councils (approximately 410,000) makes ERLC the largest public library service in Victoria.

Based on the results of the annual survey of Victorian Public Libraries (of which there are 46) ERLC is also number 1 based on per annum:

·        Library Visits – 2,025,908

·        Turnover Rate (Physical Items) - each item in our collection goes out an average of 9.2 times per year. The average for Victoria is 5.2

·        Loans — 3,389,560 - when you add together the number of loans of physical items (2,992,906) with the number of eloans of Items (396,654)

The independent annual Syndicate Survey for 2015/16 (next biannual survey is 2017/18) shows that 57% of users rate ERLC's service as between 9 and 10 (where 10 is very satisfied). The overall rating was 8.42 out of 10 for the key areas of courtesy, helpfulness, knowledge, reference and information services, up on the 8.24 of 2014/15.

From the results of the annual survey of Victorian Public Libraries, these results were achieved where for ERLC the:

·        cost library service per capita is $31.40 compared to the State average of $40.95;

·        cost library service per visit is $4.92 compared to the State average of $6.49; and

·        number of Equivalent Full Time (EFT) staff is 0.22 compared to the State average of 0.30.

 

Issue / discussion

Overall Maroondah library services are experiencing considerable growth. The major reason for this growth is the opening of the new Realm Library in October 2015.

 

During the temporary relocation of the Ringwood Library to Warrandyte Road, Ringwood Library lost its position at the highest ranked library branch in the Region for almost every service area. Since the opening of Realm, it has resumed its No 1 position in most service areas. Croydon library which gained some 'business' from the relocated library has maintained its very strong position in relation to the Region. Only Knox Library, which is based in a major Westfield Shopping Centre, comes between either Realm and Croydon being the No 1 or 2 library branch for the Region in almost all service areas.

Based on ERLC regional Year to Date (YTD) statistics, Realm and Croydon rank as follows.

Memberships YTD: Realm is ranked No 1 - 37,451, and Croydon No 3 – 24,892

 

 

 

Maroondah memberships have increased by 12.94% year to date.

 

 

17/18

16/17

Croydon

24,892

24,226

Realm

37,451

30,974

Maroondah Total

62,343

55,200

 

Visits YTD: Realm (No 1) and Croydon (No 2) are the busiest branches in the region with Visits having increased by 4.74% in a YTD comparison.

 

 

17/18

16/17

Croydon

237,979

250,139

Realm

439,368

396,534

Maroondah Total

677,347

646,673

 

 

Loans YTD: Croydon is ranked No 1 – 452,736 and Realm No 3 – 326,232.

Loans overall have increased by 3.49% in a YTD comparison.

 

 

17/18

16/17

Croydon

452,736

445,085

Realm

326,232

307,589

Maroondah Total

778,968

752,674

 

 

Public Enquiries: Realm is ranked No 2 – 29,651 and Croydon No 3 – 26,223.

Enquiries overall have increased by 3.05%.

 

 

17/18

16/17

Croydon

26,223

28,530

Realm

29,651

25,689

Maroondah Total

55,874

54,219

 

Public PCs Sessions: Realm is ranked No 1 — 35,622 and Croydon No 3 — 21,295.

While Croydon is down slightly, Realm has increased and overall PC sessions are up YTD by 3.93%.

 

 

 

 

 

 

17/18

16/17

Croydon

21,295

22,555

Realm

35,622

32,212

Maroondah Total

56,917

54,767

 

 

WiFi Sessions: Realm ranks 1 and Croydon ranks No 4 in the region after Rowville and Knox. Overall sessions are up by 93.78%, which is partly due a new WiFi system that better records sessions.

 

 

17/18

16/17

Croydon

25,678

14,437

Realm

108,996

55,062

Maroondah Total

134,674

69,499

 

Programs & Events

Maroondah libraries have proved to be very popular for adult, children's and youth programs and events. Over 2,860 adults and 10,795 children (accompanied by 8,112 adults) have attended various activities to date this year. Just some of these programs and events include: 

 

Children's and Youth Programs & Events

 

Children's & Youth Programs Attendances: Croydon at No. 3 — 9,688 and Realm is No. 4 — 9,219.

 

Programs for Adults/Juniors, Schools and Children which run at either or both locations include:

·        Pre-school activities

·        After School club

·        Tiny Tots

·        Toddlertime

·        Holiday programs

·        Teenage activities

·        Other group visits to library

·        Saturday story times

·        Festivals

·        External visits (to schools etc.)

·        School visits to Library

·        Pre-school visits to library

 

Storytimes

Storytime is popular at Realm and Croydon Library. 6,341 children (accompanied by 6,009 adults) have attended various activities to date this year.

Weekly Storytimes sessions are as follows:

 

 

 

Croydon*

Realm**

Tinytots

0 – 12 months

1

1

Toddlers**

1 – 3 years

1

1

Preschoolers

3 – 5 years

1

1

Family

1 - 5 years

 

1

Family Saturday

1 - 5 years

1

1

* Croydon’s Toddler’s storytime is also presented through Auslan once a month.

** ** Storytimes are so popular at Realm that a booking system has had to be introduced.

 

School Holiday Program

The school holidays year to date were very busy with families wanting to participate in our branches’ (mostly) free activities. 1,190 children accompanied by 772 adults attended the events.

 

Some the events during the last school holidays included:

 

Easter Egg Protector Challenge: Realm and Croydon

The children had to design a ‘contraption’ to prevent their chocolate egg getting broken when heavy books dropped on it, and they had to purchase their building materials using Bunny Money at the Bunny Shop. Maths, budgeting and decision making skills were required and there were some interesting learnings along the way e.g. investing too heavily in feathers!

 

Craft Activities

Both Maroondah branches offered a range of craft activities, “all day” craft activities (where families can visit the branch at any time during the day to participate in the activities on offer)

 


 

STEAM Sessions

Steam activities in the last quarter included:

 

Digital Music: Croydon

Making digital music at Croydon. This program attracted kids who were learning instruments and others who just liked music. Everyone was able to make an original tune and their creations were emailed home afterwards.

 

3D printing: Realm

3D printing is very popular but slow and labour intensive. A small group were able to see their designs come to life and discuss why their ideas might or might not work in real life.

 

LEGO Program with Bricks4Kidz and The Young Engineers: Croydon and Realm

A 6 week LEGO based STEAM program where children learn engineering and mathematics in a hands on way by making a different LEGO build every week.

 

 

RingWORD program

The Story Peddlers visited Realm as part of the. The Story Peddlers erected their tent in Art Space for the week, creating a warm and cosy atmosphere for storytelling. All the regular storytimes plus some extras were run in the tent, in addition to the performances by Matteo the Story Peddler.

 

International Table Top Games Day: Ringwood Social Games

Over 100 people attended International Table Top Games Day at Realm and chose from a huge variety of board games.

 

Collections

As reported previously, ERLC subscribes to Kanopy.

 

Kanopy is an on-demand streaming video service for public libraries that provides library members access to a large collection of films. Kanopy has now set up a new platform specifically for children called 'Kanopy Kids'.

 

Content is age appropriate and has a whole host of material from the ABC. Importantly, Kanopy Kids features parental controls to keep children safe.

 

Youth Partnerships with Council

 

Pop Culture Conversation Club at Realm: Maroondah Metro Access and Maroondah Youth Services

The first Pop Culture Conversation Club was held in April at Realm. This group is designed to provide a supported social setting for young people aged between 16 – 21 who have Autism Spectrum Disorder.

 

This group may struggle to connect socially but are passionate about characters from books, movies or comics. The ‘Pop Culture’ theme provides a springboard for conversation and the library is a source of material that aligns with their interests. Feedback from participants in the first session was extremely positive.

 

It is hoped that in future the group will be able to use their familiarity with the Realm location to engage in other age-appropriate activities like going to the movies or having dinner in a restaurant.

 

Technology and You: Maroondah Metro Access

ERLC was a sponsor and exhibitor at the highly successful ‘Technology and You’ event organised by Maroondah Metro Access.

 

Cutting edge technologies were showcased that enable people with disabilities to live more meaningful and independent lives.

 

ERLC was able to demonstrate the accessible features of the various digital collections available and also get feedback on where mainstream digital solutions fail people with disabilities.

 

Adult Programs Attendances YTD: Croydon is ranked at No 3 – 1,756 and Realm at No 7 – 1,104.

Programs which run at either or both locations are:

·        Author Talks/Workshops

·        Book chat/Book club

·        Family History

·        Monthly Clubs

·        Friendship Groups

·        External Visits

·        Military History

 

26:52 Reading Challenge – read 26 books in 52 weeks.

There has been a phenomenal response to the inaugural Reading Challenge – as of the first week of February over 700 members had taken up the gauntlet and are reading books outside their comfort zone.

 

Some of the challenges are: ‘Read a book published before 1850’, ‘Read a book that is set in Asia’ and ‘Listen to an audiobook or eAudiobook’.

 

The oldest registered member is 96 years young. Those who complete the challenge will go into the draw for a literary lovers prize pack.

Bookchats

Croydon and Realm host two and one ‘chats’ respectively every month.

Bookclub Program

ERLC’s Bookclub program provides sets of 10 books for Bookclubs to borrow. Both Croydon and Realm have 37 Bookclubs respectively.

 

Currently ERLC has over 400 Bookclub sets. 50-70 new sets are added to the collection each year. Titles include classic and contemporary fiction, memoirs, biographies and general non-fiction. We welcome suggestions for titles from the Bookclubs as well as ERLC staff members.

 

The Bookclub fee for 2017 is $350 per Bookclub. This entitles the group to receive a Bookclub set, delivered to the branch of their choice, each month with a loan period of six weeks.

Digital Library Statistics Major Platforms - Year to Date

Based on the single metric of loans generated, ERLC’s four major digital platforms would make this area its fourth largest ‘branch’.

 

Platform

 

1st Quarter

2nd Quarter

3rd Quarter

YTD

Overdrive

eItems borrowed

89,901

87,417

92,229

269,547

Borrowbox

eItems borrowed

8,606

9,014

9,976

27,596

Rbdigital - OneClick

eAudiobooks borrowed

370

479

663

1,512

Rbdigital - Zinio

eMagazines borrowed

19,551

17,885

18,591

56,027

 

 

 

 

 

354,682

 

Author Talks

 

Richard Cornish: Realm

The author of the Brainfood column in The Age’s Good Food supplement spoke about cooking, eating, the chemistry that makes food taste good and travelling through Spain searching for perfect dishes.  

 

Toni Jordan: Realm

The first Brunch with an author for 2018 saw an informed audience interacting with Toni Jordan over coffee and pastries.  Toni’s journey from scientist to novelist and the different ways she has woven the scientific experience into her fiction made for a fascinating morning.

 

Social & Technology Events

 

Genie Exchanges

Sessions were held at Croydon to provide opportunities to meet fellow genealogists in the local area. Research stories were swapped, genealogists helped each other and in turn were helped with their own research.

 

Ask our Experts Sessions

Croydon offers one hour appointments with ERLC specialised staff to receive help with:

·        Family History searching

·        Newspaper articles

·        Library databases

·        Research questions

 

Open Technology Q&A

Informal Q&A with ERLC’s technology team every second Wednesday.

 

Conversation Cafe

Every Friday at Realm there is an opportunity for our community members for whom English is their second language to meet over a cuppa.

 

TECHNOLOGY

 

Events Calendar

The new events calendar was launched at the start of March and has been widely accepted and utilised by the community.

 

Over 4,600 bookings have been made, and 4,700 events have been added including all the storytimes, IT training and regular group activities (most of which do not require bookings). Over $1,600 of ticket sales have been processed.

 

Members are embracing the ability to manage their own booking experience, find events they love and submit event feedback.

 

Since inception new features have been added including an array of new data analytics tools that will enable us to review, evaluate and compare events with much greater accuracy.

 

This system will serve as the backbone of event programming as the library expands its reach into the community through engaging activities.

 

Refreshed Member Print System

Library public PCs and Wi-Fi have received an update to the way member printing is managed. Members must now log in with their library cards and PINs when printing, this affords them a new level of privacy as they are now the only ones who can view and print their documents.

 

Simultaneously, new money recharge stations have been installed. These stations support the new $5 and $10 notes and are much easier for members to use.

 

 

 

Mobile Phones & Broadband

The organisation has consolidated its mobile phone and broadband solutions to one provider, Telstra. This has resulted in significant savings in cost, but also in a much more stable and simple communications system.

 

Website Improvements

As part of ERLC’s ongoing website development agenda the site has gained a series of security and performance improvements. The 70,000 subscriber email newsletter is now completely integrated with the website, at no cost.

 

Over the next few months a revised Mega Menu navigational system will be implemented to help members explore more of the site, and each branch will feature a list of upcoming events.

 

ERLC is investing time in Google My Business for presence, as it has become clear that its members are increasingly relying on its Google Search & Maps integrations.

Financial / economic issues

The Maroondah City Council contributes in the order of $2.8m for this service for services at Croydon and Realm per annum.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

As outlined under the Strategic/Policy Issues heading above, the library service is a very significant universal service for all members of the community. Council seeks to ensure increases in productivity and efficiencies don't impact on the services but continue to enhance the Maroondah residents library experience.

Community consultation

Not Applicable.

Conclusion

Council's Library service provided by the Eastern Regional Library Service provides a highly valued universal service to the Maroondah Community at both Realm and Croydon sites as outlined. The first seven months reporting in the 17/18 year demonstrates high membership, visits, loans, public enquiries, public pc activities, Wi-Fi, adult, children and youth program attendance and program events continue to be well received and attended by the Maroondah community. These figures are some of the highest for the region and demonstrates Council's continued investment in this service is reaping significant benefits and rewards for the community.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL NOTES THE EASTERN REGIONAL LIBRARIES CORPORATION REPORT February 2018 – april 2018

 

  


DIRECTOR Operations, Assets & Leisure Adam Todorov

 

Capital Funding for Committees of Council 2018/2019

Item 1

 

Purpose

To seek Council approval for funding applications made by Special Committees of Council under Council’s 2018/2019 Capital Funding for Committees of Council support program.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in the Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Draft Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report;

 

Outcome Area: Safe, healthy and active community

 

Vision Statement: in 2040 Maroondah will be a safe, healthy and active community with local opportunities provided for people of all ages and abilities to have high levels of social, emotional and physical wellbeing.

 

Key Directions 2017-2021

 

1.21 Support and empower local community groups, sporting clubs and special interest groups across Maroondah.

Background

There are currently three Special Committees of Council operating within the City of Maroondah.  These are:

·        Ringwood Athletic Centre;

·        Warrien Reserve; and 

·        Warranwood Reserve

 

Generally, each Special Committee of Council is authorised on behalf of Council to manage the facility identified and to exercise Council’s powers and functions in respect of:

·        Contracts up to a prescribed amount;

·        Determination of fees for casual use; and

·        Doing all things necessary in connection with the performance of such functions

 

All Special Committees of Council were provided with details of the 2018/2019 Support Program and invited to make submissions. The process involved applicants contacting Council Officers for an application form, then providing a detailed written submission, which responded to clearly defined selection criteria. Committees were requested to submit applications for the Capital Funding for Committees of Council by Friday 27th April 2018.


Issue / discussion

Two (2) applications were received for the Capital Funding for Committees of Council 2018/2019, requesting a total of $17,600 (inclusive of GST) in funding assistance, both of which are recommended for funding.

 

The successfully nominated submissions for funding are detailed in Attachment 1.

Financial / economic issues

The Capital Expenditure for the 2018/2019 Capital Funding for Committees of Council Support Program has been set at $66,000 (inclusive of GST), with a maximum of $8,800 (inclusive of GST) available in funding to each Special Committee of Council.  Council has recommended that two (2) projects, at a total cost of $17,600 (inclusive of GST) be funded. It is also recommended that the remaining funds ($48,400) be moved across to the 2018/2019 Capital Funding for Community Groups Program. 

Environmental / amenity issues

Each of the projects recommended for approval will serve to enhance the facility to which the projects relate.

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Special Committees of Council generally comprise of local community members who represent and advocate for the interests of the broader community.  Council Officers advised all Special Committees of Council of the Committee of Council Support Program guidelines, timelines, and process.

Conclusion

Approval of the proposed projects will support the Special Committees of Council in their continued management of the various facilities and the future development of Council owned community facilities.

 

Satisfactory completion of these projects will also provide clear evidence to user groups and the community, of Council’s continuing support for Special Committees of Council and the facilities managed by them.


 

 

Attachments

1.

Capital Funding for Committees of Council

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council

1.       APPROVES THE RECOMMENDED APPLICATIONS FOR FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE THROUGH THE capital funding for committees of council SUPPORT PROGRAM TOTALLING $17,600 (INCLUSIVE OF GST) AS OUTLINED IN ATTACHMENT 1 TO THIS REPORT

2.       Allocates THE remaining $48,400 from the capital funding for committees of council SUPPORT PROGRAM to THE CAPITAL FUNDING FOR COMMUNITY GROUPS SUPPORT PROGRAM

3.       APPROVES THESE GRANTS BASED ON ONE-YEAR FUNDING AND SERVICE AGREEMENTS

4.       ADVISES ALL COMMITTEES OF THE OUTCOME OF THEIR GRANT SUBMISSION

 


DIRECTOR Operations, Assets & Leisure Adam Todorov

 

Capital Funding for Community Groups 2018/2019

Item 2

 

Purpose

To seek Council approval for the allocation of financial assistance through the Capital Funding for Community Groups Funding Program to nominated community organisations for the 2018/2019 financial year.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in the Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Draft Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 2: 2018-2019) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report;

 

Outcome Area: Safe, healthy and active community

 

Vision Statement: in 2040 Maroondah will be a safe, healthy and active community with local opportunities provided for people of all ages and abilities to have high levels of social, emotional and physical wellbeing.

 

Key Directions 2017-2021

 

1.21 Support and empower local community groups, sporting clubs and special interest groups across Maroondah.

Background

There are two categories available for organisations to apply for Capital Funding:

 

·        Category 1 –  projects under $5,000, which are fully funded by Council; and

 

·        Category 2 – projects over $5,000, where a Council contribution of 50% of the total project cost (with a max of $75,000 Council contribution) applies

 

The Capital Funding for Community Groups 2018/2019 Program was advertised on Council’s website. Application guidelines were sent to all kindergartens, senior citizens groups, youth groups and sporting clubs/organisations within the municipality that utilise Council facilities.

 

The application process involved two stages:  Stage 1 required applicants to submit an initial project proposal for Council consideration. Council officers reviewed the submissions and recommended eligible projects to Stage 2 which required a detailed project submission and full written application.  Organisations were requested to submit applications for Capital Funding for Community Groups 2018/2019 by Friday 27th April 2018.

 

The Capital Funding for Community Groups 2018/2019 review process was undertaken at an Assembly of Councillors on Monday 4 June 2018.

 

All applications received were considered and recommendations were made based on a clearly defined set of selection criteria, which included:


Community Benefit

·        Demonstrate a direct benefit to the residents of the City of Maroondah;

·        Evidence that supports an anticipated increase in participation rates;

·        The extent to which the project maximises the use of the facility;

·        That the proposed project is sympathetic to the surrounds of the reserve or building; and

·        The extent to which projects address the issues of safety and risk management

Evidence of Need

·        Evidence that demonstrates community support and need for the project;

·        Evidence to demonstrate improvement to Council assets; and

·        The extent to which the project is supported by an adopted concept plan, feasibility assessment and/or linked to any planning process of Council

Financial Assessment

·        The financial capacity of the organisation to service a deferred payment plan and initial cash contribution; and

·        The ability of the project to be completed within the following financial year

 

Category 1 (i.e. less than $5k) projects are fully funded by Council with no organisational contribution. The Category 2 (i.e. over $5k) project costs are split evenly between Council and the organisation (with a maximum Council contribution of $75,000). The organisational contribution is also split between an upfront contribution of at least 50% and an optional 5-year deferred payment to be repaid to Council by the relevant organisation.

Issue / discussion

Fifteen (15) community groups requested a total of $225,561 (inclusive of GST) in funding assistance, from which fourteen (14) projects were recommended to receive funding.

 

The submissions recommended for funding are detailed in Attachment 1.

 

In relation to the one (1) project not recommended for funding in the 2018/2019 program, Council Officers will work with the organisation to further develop their project for future application submission and funding consideration.

Financial / economic issues

A total of $176,000 (inclusive of GST) is available for allocation in the Capital Funding for Community Groups 2018/2019 Program budget. Fourteen (14) projects are recommended for funding, at a cost of $220,561 (inclusive of GST). An amount of $48,400 (inclusive of GST) is available from the Capital Funding for Committees of Council program which brings the total budget to $224,400.

Environmental / amenity issues

Financial assistance provided by the Capital Funding for Community Groups Program fosters positive links between Council and community organisations through the improvement and effective management of Council assets.

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Considerable effort has been made to ensure that all relevant groups/organisations were aware of this funding program through Council’s website and via direct email updates to local clubs and organisations. Significant discussions have also occurred between Council officers and the various community groups prior to the application process commencing, to ensure that the various community groups had adequate information to support their respective applications. 

Conclusion

The Capital Funding for Community Groups Program encourages commitment from organisations for the continued improvement to Council facilities and their future development.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Capital Funding for Community Groups

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 


 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council

1.       approveS the recommended applications for financial assistance through the capital funding for community groups 2018/2019 program totalling $220,561 (inclusive of gst) as outlined in attachment 1 to this report

2.       approves these grants based on one-year funding and service agreements

3.       advises all organisations of the outcome of their grant submission

  


ACTING DIRECTOR Strategy & Community grant meyer

 

Maroondah Climate Change Risk and Adaptation Strategy 2018/19-2021/22

Item 1

 

Purpose

To seek endorsement of the Climate Change Risk and Adaptation Strategy 2018/19- 2021/22 prior to release to the community.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area: 

·        A well governed and empowered community

·        A clean, green and sustainable community

·        An attractive, thriving and well built community

Our Vision: Maroondah will be a vibrant and diverse city with a healthy and active community, living in green and leafy neighbourhoods which are connected to thriving and accessible activity centres contributing to a prosperous economy within a safe, inclusive and sustainable environment.

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

The Draft Climate Change Risk and Adaptation Strategy outlines how Council and partners will work towards a more climate adapted Maroondah. This Strategy lays out a plan of action for the next four years enabling Council to prepare for the long-term risks of climate change. It will also guide Council’s efforts to integrate climate change risk management and adaptation.

As such the Strategy speaks to multiple Maroondah 2040 Outcome Areas and many of the key directions within the Maroondah City Council, Council Plan 2017-2021. The key directions include the following:

4.12 Mitigate and adapt to the effects and impacts of climate change.

4.15 Work in partnership to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and support the community in adapting to a post peak oil environment.

4.16 Be responsive and adaptive to new environmental opportunities and threats as they occur, building resilience and capacity within the community.

6.11 Ensure the management of infrastructure and prioritisation of capital works considers demographic change, the impacts of climate change, and accessibility for all ages and abilities.

6.13 Coordinate and advocate for the increased utilisation, longevity, and availability of fit for purpose public, private and not for profit buildings and spaces that can act as key places for neighbourhood connection.

8.2 Ensure responsible and sustainable management of Maroondah’s resources, assets, infrastructure and natural environment.

8.4 Foster a culture of innovation, cooperation, commitment, communication and continuous improvement that positions Maroondah City Council as a leader in local government.

8.9 Create opportunities for shared decision making through active community involvement.

8.14 Work in partnership to deliver services that recognise and are responsive to the interests and needs of the community.

Priority Action 2017-2018:

Develop a Climate Change Risk and Adaptation Strategy.

Background

Building on work already undertaken by Council the Strategy draws on a solid evidence base heavily informed by stakeholder engagement and the latest climate science including projections from the Bureau of Meteorology and the national science body, CSIRO, as well as vulnerability information to inform climate change adaptation planning.

 

Input was also obtained from the Eastern Alliance for Greenhouse Action (EAGA) of which Council is a member. A wide range of service areas from across Council provided input, in particular, Risk Management.

 

Council’s operations, assets and service delivery provided to the community is vulnerable to a range of climate hazards (potentially damaging events) such as heatwaves and flooding. As the intensity, severity and duration of extreme weather events increases, enhancing the resilience of operations, assets and service delivery will become more important.

 

The Climate Change Act 2017 is a key statute to manage climate change risks and maximise opportunities that arise from decisive action. The Act identifies councils as one of the decision-makers that must consider the impacts of climate change, specifically during the preparation of a Municipal Health and Wellbeing Plan (MHWP) (in Maroondah this is known as the Maroondah Community Wellbeing Plan). Within the MHWP sustainable development and climate change adaptation and mitigation are addressed within the liveability domain of the action plan.

 

Adaptation is action taken to prepare for actual or expected changes in the climate, in order to minimise harm, act on opportunities or cope with the consequences (Climate Change Act 2017). Climate change adaptation means changing the way we behave and doing things more appropriate for the future climate.

 

Adaptation is a shared responsibility – The Australian and Victorian Governments have released climate change adaptation strategies (2015 and 2017 respectively).

 

The Victorian Government’s Climate Change Adaptation Plan 2017-2020 identifies roles and responsibilities for managing the impacts and risks of climate change. Roles and responsibilities of local governments – Provide leadership and good governance, represent the needs and values of local communities, and foster community cohesion:

·        Manage climate change risks to council community services and assets, with support from the Victorian Government.

·        Identify the needs and priorities of the municipality, and communicate these to Victorian Government where needed.

·        Develop and deliver locally-appropriate adaptation responses.

·        Building the resilience of local assets and services.

·        Plan for emergency management at the municipal level, provide relief and recovery services, and support emergency response operations.

·        Help the Victorian Government understand localised impacts and responses.

·        Work with the community to help people understand and get involved in climate change adaptation.

·        Help connect the Victorian Government with the community.

 

There is increasing scientific evidence that some degree of climate change is now inevitable and that changes have already begun to occur.

 

Council carried out a risk assessment workshop in partnership with the EAGA to determine how these climate change projections would impact on Council’s operations, assets and service delivery.

 

The risks relate to drainage and flooding, financial impacts, asset damage, health and wellbeing, open space, biodiversity, water security, service demand, service disruption and insurance. Some risks have broader impacts and require a coordinated response with others.

 

The Strategy is a risk management response document. Climate change risks affect every aspect of Council’s assets, operations and service delivery as climate change is not just an environmental issue.

 

Key functions of Council in adapting to climate change include the following:

·        Ensuring assets (starting with buildings) can withstand extreme events and climate change

·        Identifying how climate change will impact street trees, bushland and urban biodiversity

·        Building community and staff understanding of climate change risks and partnerships internally and externally for risk reduction

·        Advocate for the community where Council does not control the outcomes.

 

Council will foster a process of ongoing organisational learning from experience, adjustment, and transformation.

 

The Draft Strategy was placed on public exhibition between 21 March 2018 and 18 April 2018 with no submissions received.

Issue / discussion

The Strategy has four overarching objectives:

·        Plan for and manage the risks of climate change, in particular, drainage and extreme weather events

·        Seek opportunities for partnerships and collaboration with stakeholders and the community that support climate change adaptation

·        Use the natural environment to build our adaptive capacity – while a risk itself, the natural environment can also be used to help in climate change management

·        Encourage future proofing design – foster places capable of adapting to change and responding to current and future risks.

 

The Strategy also identifies 42 climate change risks to Council. It includes 25 key directions to assist Council to move towards achieving a climate adapted Maroondah. The preparation of a detailed Action Plan will complement these.

 

A vision for a more climate adapted Maroondah – Climate change adaptation will be used to strengthen our ability to be healthy, safe, happy and vibrant in a changing climate.

 

This Vision will be achieved by addressing climate change adaptation through three Strategic Outcomes outlined in the Strategy. The Key Directions for each Strategic Outcome describe how Council will specifically respond.

·        Outcome Area 1 – People. Outcome description: Maroondah’s people are climate resilient, with vulnerable groups prioritised – both community and Council’s staff.

·        Outcome Area 2 – Places. Outcome description: Maroondah’s places, including the built environment, its biodiversity and waterways, are climate resilient, improving our health and wellbeing.

·        Outcome Area 3 – Embed Adaptation. Outcome description: Community and staff capacity is increased through improved awareness, education and support for climate change adaptation practices.

 

These Strategic Outcomes recognise the interplay between the built, natural and social environments and seek to ensure climate change risks are managed in a planned and considered way.

 

Implementation is the collective responsibility of various service areas within Council and will be undertaken collaboratively with a diverse range of external partners. For Strategy delivery, a cross directorate team will be established to monitor progress supported by the Finance and Governance teams and the Integrated Planning Department. Evaluation will be undertaken through the development and review of a detailed Action Plan. This Plan will be reviewed annually to track progress on actions, with the results reported back to Council.

Financial / economic issues

An effective response to managing the risk of climate change requires climate change mitigation and climate change adaptation. Council is strongly committed to both.

 

Council has been pursuing responses to climate change for many years and has made significant progress in avoiding and reducing greenhouse gas emissions (i.e. climate change mitigation) through implementation of its Carbon Neutral Strategy & Action Plan adopted by Council in 2015.

 

The Draft Climate Change Risk and Adaptation Strategy has a focus on climate change adaptation. It lays a plan of action for the next four years enabling Council to prepare for the long-term risks of climate change. It will guide Council’s efforts to integrate climate change risk management and adaptation. Early planning for climate change will help reduce impacts. Council supports a proactive approach to managing the risks associated with climate change. The Strategy has at its heart an ethos that the best and most cost-effective approach for climate change adaptation is embedding relevant actions into Council’s existing service delivery. It includes key directions that will help Council to manage identified risks and provide co-benefits.

Environmental / amenity issues

The Strategy includes an overarching objective to use the natural environment to build our adaptive capacity – while a risk itself, the natural environment can also be used to help in climate change management. To illustrate, an Australian Government funded study of 1.5 million trees in 29 council areas across Australia including Maroondah found that higher temperatures and urban heat means new tree species may be introduced, existing trees must be given special care and some trees may disappear in certain locations.

Social / community issues

This Strategy has been prepared to help ensure that climate change risks are managed in a planned and considered way. As this is Council’s first adaptation strategy much of its focus is on incorporating climate change risks into existing activities to ensure an integrated approach. For example:

·        Recognition of climate change as a strategic risk is driving more proactive adaptation planning across Council.

·        Linking with emergency management planning will ensure Council is well placed to recognise and manage emerging risks.

According to policy makers, strategies and actions can be pursued to move towards climate-resilient pathways for sustainable development, while at the same time helping to improve livelihoods, social and economic wellbeing, and responsible environmental management. Increased capacity, voice, and influence of low-income groups and vulnerable communities and their partnerships with local governments also benefit adaptation. Decisions range from simple to complex, and some will need to be made sooner than others. The pathways approach to climate change adaptation is the accepted best practice.

Community consultation

Significant community engagement was undertaken in the preparation of this Strategy. This was done through a range of methods including:

·        A discussion paper (Maroondah City Council 2016) which drew together a range of research and data on climate change adaptation in Maroondah.

·        An online survey.

·        Council’s Café Consult marquee at the 2016 Maroondah Festival. Council received 138 written responses to questions posed. Participants provided a total of 378 “hot-dot” (multi-vote counts) against actions people have taken to make their home more comfortable and adaptable to climate change.

·        Meetings with key stakeholders including various greenhouse alliances.

·        Website, social media, local newspaper advertisement and display at service centres.

 

The views of the community were documented in the Community Engagement Report (Maroondah City Council 2017). Both the Community Engagement Report and the discussion paper are available on Council’s website: www.maroondah.vic.gov.au

 

Consultation opportunities were provided to external and internal stakeholders, including presentation to Council’s Strategic Asset Management Working Group and Risk Management Advisory Group.

 

The ‘City of Maroondah Targets included in the Port Phillip and Westernport Regional Catchment Strategy’ are available in the Draft Climate Change Risk and Adaptation Strategy and link into broader regional goals.  These targets were supported at the Council Meeting on 24 April 2017 and the Maroondah Environment Advisory Committee meeting on 28 February 2017.

 

In 2016 and 2017, Council officers participated in the Community Sector Climate Resilience Program run by the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). Other opportunities Council participated in included the Resilient Melbourne Program of which Maroondah is an active participant.

 

Following approval at the Council Meeting on 19 March 2018 the Draft Strategy was placed on public exhibition for a period of four weeks with no submissions received.

 

Conclusion

The Draft Climate Change Risk and Adaptation Strategy outlines how Council and partners will work towards a more climate adapted Maroondah. The Strategy lays out a plan of action for the next four years enabling Council to prepare for the long-term risks of climate change. It will guide Council’s efforts to integrate climate change risk management and adaptation.  The Draft Strategy has been the subject of extensive community consultation and is strongly aligned with key directions within the Maroondah 2040 Community Vision.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Climate Change Risk and Adaptation Strategy Post PE June 2018

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council

1.       Adopts the climate change risk and adaptation strategy 2018/19- 2021/22

2.       authorises officers to arrange for the suitable publication and distribution of the climate change risk and adaptation strategy 2018/19-2021/22 to community groups and relevant stakeholders

 


acting DIRECTOR Strategy & Community grant meyer

 

Draft Maroondah Gambling Policy

Item 2

 

Purpose

To seek Council endorsement for the public exhibition of the Draft Maroondah Gambling Policy 2018.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A safe, healthy and active community

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be a safe, healthy and active community with local opportunities provided for people of all ages and abilities to have high levels of social, emotional and physical wellbeing.

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

1.3 Promote and facilitate safer cultures relating to issues of alcohol, drugs, tobacco, gambling, child abuse and family violence

Priority Action 2017-2018:

Finalise a new Gaming Policy and commence preparation of a planning scheme amendment to incorporate the policy into the Maroondah Planning scheme.

Background

A 2018/19 priority action identified within the Council Plan 2017-2021 involves the finalisation of a new Gambling Policy for Maroondah. Once adopted, this Policy will replace the previous policy developed in 2007.

 

The Policy aims to:

·        Provide a ‘whole of Council’ approach to preventing and minimising gambling-related harm in the community.

·        Describe Council’s policy position on gambling in the municipality; and

·        Outline key priorities relating to service provision, advocacy and Council’s statutory, strategic and regulatory roles.

 

Council commissioned Symplan Consulting to undertake background research and lead stakeholder engagement to support development of a new gambling policy. This research was aimed at understanding the context, analysing the evidence, seeking both community and stakeholder input, and identifying potential policy directions. The work involved:

·        A literature review;

·        An environmental scan;

·        Stakeholder engagement; and

·        Community consultation

 

The research and consultation has informed the development of a Draft Maroondah Gambling Policy 2018.

 

Work has also commenced on preparing documentation for a future planning scheme amendment to implement the Policy into the Maroondah Planning Scheme, following Council's adoption of the Maroondah Gambling Policy 2018.

 

Before Council can proceed with a planning scheme amendment, the Draft Gambling Policy needs to be placed on public exhibition. Following the public exhibition process and any associated amendments, the draft Gambling Policy will be submitted to a Council Meeting for formal consideration.

Issue / discussion

Gambling-related harm is understood to be initial or exacerbated adverse consequences due to an engagement with gambling that leads to a decrement to the health or wellbeing of an individual, family unit, community or population.

 

Geographical factors include convenience gambling, proximity, density, spatial distribution and clustering and exposure. Gambling environment factors include venue design, type and size; net machine revenue; operating hours and delivery of responsible service of gambling practices. Social and economic factors include life circumstances, health and wellbeing status, cultural background, socioeconomic disadvantage, household composition, income, age, employment and occupation.

 

The use of electronic gaming machines (EGM’s) are the only form of gambling which Council has the ability to influence or control through the planning system. Several statutory instruments define Council’s role in protecting and enhancing the community’s health and wellbeing. These include advocacy, service provision, engagement and collaboration, information dissemination, regulation and enforcement. The scope of the planning system to prevent and address gamblingrelated harms is clearly defined by the legislative framework.

 

From the research and consultation undertaken, a strategic framework has been developed and a set of commitments identified to outline Council’s policy position in relation to gambling. Three priority areas are identified within this strategic framework: partnerships, advocacy and planning, regulation and enforcement

 

Financial / economic issues

Not applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not applicable

 

Social / community issues

The background research found that in 2016/17 Maroondah had the highest density of EGMs per 1,000 adults of all metropolitan municipalities in Victoria. Maroondah also had the fifth highest expenditure per adults of all metropolitan municipalities in Victoria.

 

The suburbs of Bayswater North, Ringwood, Croydon, Ringwood East and Kilsyth display several indicators of vulnerability to gambling-related harm. Each of these suburbs currently  contain gaming venues. Eight of the ten gaming venues in Maroondah are located in close proximity to relatively high concentrations of social housing dwellings

Community consultation

To seek feedback on the Draft Maroondah Gambling Policy 2018, a public exhibition process is proposed.

The process will involve:

·        Public exhibition of the Draft Maroondah Gambling Policy 2018 on Council’s website, Council Service Centres and local libraries.

·        Advertisements in the local paper seeking comments or feedback from the community on the Draft Maroondah Gambling Policy 2018.

To this end, an advertisement will be placed in the Maroondah Leader newspaper on Tuesday 3 July 2018 advising the community that the documents is available for viewing on Council’s website, and will also be available from any of Council’s Service Centres and Libraries from this date.

 

Both written and online comments on both documents will be received until 5pm on 27 July 2018

 

Once feedback is considered, the documents will be amended as appropriate and be brought back to Council for formal consideration.

Conclusion

Council has developed a Draft Maroondah Gambling Policy 2018 involving considerable background research and consultation. Council authorisation is sought to release this draft Policy for public exhibition before being formally considered for adoption.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Draft Maroondah Gambling Policy 2018 - June 2018

2.

Maroondah Gambling Policy Background Report - March 2018

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That

1.       COUNCIL authoriseS the release of the DRAFT MAROONDAH GAMBLING POLICY 2018 on public exhibition from 29 JUNE 2018 TO 27 July 2018 AND receive SUBMISSIONS.

2.       follOWING public EXHIBITION AND CONSIDERATION OF ANY SUBMISSIONS received, THE MAROONDAH GAMBLING POLICY 2018 WILL BE PRESENTED TO cOUNCIL FOR formal consideration.

3.       Council thanks local stakeholders and community members who have provided their input to inform development of this draft policy.

 


acting DIRECTOR Strategy & Community grant meyer

 

Draft Affordable and Social Housing Policy

Item 3

 

Purpose

To seek Council endorsement for the public exhibition of the Draft Maroondah Affordable and Social Housing 2018 in accordance with Council’s Community Engagement Policy 2015.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  An attractive, thriving and well built community

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an attractive community with high quality residential and commercial areas incorporating infrastructure that meets the needs and aspirations of all ages and abilities. A diverse range of housing options will be available and thriving activity centres will provide a broad range of facilities and services that meet community needs.

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

7.5 Advocate and promote the provision of a diversity of affordable housing options to suit a range of lifestyle needs and life-stage requirements

1.15 Advocate and promote the increased provision of affordable housing options in accessible locations

7.6 Work in partnership to break cycles of poverty and socio-economic disadvantage, particularly within marginalised communities

6.8 Encourage and support the provision of a diverse range of housing across Maroondah, that meets the needs of current and future residents

6.7 Plan and facilitate the development of a community where everyone can live, work and play locally

Priority Action 2017-2018:

Develop a Council policy position on affordable and social housing

Background

One of the 2018/19 priority actions identified within the Council Plan 2017-2021 involves the development of an Affordable and Social Housing Policy. This new Policy was an identified action within the Maroondah Housing Strategy (2016), which acknowledged that Council has a role to play in the affordable and social housing space.

This new Affordable and Social Housing Policy has been prepared to help Council better understand affordable and social housing issues, establish closer relationships and ongoing sharing of information with the local service sector, and clarify Council’s policy position in responding to affordable and social housing issues.

To inform development of this Policy, Council commissioned SGS Economics and Planning to develop a discussion paper to canvass issues, policy options and practical steps that Council can take to effect change in the supply of social and affordable housing. This involved targeted consultation with relevant stakeholders, a Maroondah Affordable and Social Housing Forum, the assembly of evidence on housing market failures, and identification of a range of policy options.

Issue / discussion

The background research and stakeholder consultation identified that:

·        There is a lack of suitable affordable accommodation for single persons in Maroondah

·        There is a lack of public housing in the City of Maroondah compared to other regions

·        Many people are on the waiting list for social housing and move in between shortterm accommodation options while waiting

·        Services available for those at risk of homelessness or those who need support are not readily available and/or are not up to date

·        The negative perception of social housing in the local community often prevents affordable housing projects from getting off the ground

·        There is a spectrum of policy options available in which Council could play in promoting social and affordable housing in the City

 

From this work, a Draft Maroondah Affordable and Social Housing Policy 2018 has been developed that highlights four priority areas for Council to play a role, along with a number of more specific policy directions. These priority areas are:

1.       Facilitate effective planning direction and innovative support

2.       Play a key facilitation and brokerage role to support the delivery of increased affordable and social housing in Maroondah

3.       Work in partnership to advocate for increased investment and support for affordable and social housing

4.       Apply a proactive approach to encouraging greater investment and supply of social and affordable Housing

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

 

 

Social / community issues

The City of Maroondah has traditionally been an affordable location. It has historically allowed key workers to live near their place of employment, older residents to age in place and young adults to purchase in the area. The incidence of housing stress and after housing cost poverty was comparatively favourable in a metropolitan context. Things have changed.

Analysis of historic census data by SGS indicates that 1 in 10 households in Maroondah require assistance to avoid serious or severe housing stress. Excluding those lowincome households in the City who already have the security of social housing, there are over 4,000 Maroondah households requiring significant housing assistance.

The primary driver of the need for social and affordable housing is low income. However, this

can be compounded by a range of factors that may limit the capacity of households to participate in the mainstream housing market.

 

Whilst a permanent stock of social housing equating to 10% of all dwellings in Maroondah would enable the community to meet most needs, at present the current stock equates to approximately 2.5% of all dwellings in the municipality.

Community consultation

To inform development of the Draft Affordable and Social Housing Policy 2018, two focus groups were held with various stakeholders including: Community Housing Ltd – Eastern Metropolitan, Anchor Inc., EACH, EAHA, Eastern Domestic Violence Service, Maroondah Community Assist, Safe Futures Foundation, Salvation Army Community Connections, Croydon Partners in Community Safety, EastCare Gateways Program (Salvos), Uniting Care Harrison, and Wesley Homeless and Support Service.

Interviews were also undertaken with representatives from Housing Choices Australia, Common Equity Housing, Community Housing Institute Australia and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).

In addition, a major Affordable and Social Housing Forum was held in March 2018 with a wide range of local stakeholders which also explored priority issues in social and affordable housing, the drivers behind these issues, and the potential role of Council in addressing the problems in question.

Input from these focus groups, interviews and the forum helped to inform the development of the Policy.

To seek feedback on the Draft Affordable and Social Housing Policy 2018, a public exhibition process is proposed.

The process will involve:

·        Public exhibition of the Draft Maroondah Affordable and Social Housing Policy 2018 on Council’s website, Council Service Centres and local libraries.

·        Advertisements in the local paper seeking comments or feedback from the community on the Draft Maroondah Affordable and Social Housing Policy 2018.

·        A written invitation to stakeholders involved in interviews, focus groups and the forum during the project to provide feedback on the Draft Maroondah Affordable and Social Housing Policy 2018

To this end, an advertisement will be placed in the Maroondah Leader newspaper on Tuesday 3 July 2018 advising the community that the documents is available for viewing on Council’s website, and will also be available from any of Council’s Service Centres and Libraries from this date.

 

Both written and online comments on both documents will be received until 5pm on 27 July 2018

 

Once feedback is considered, the documents will be amended as appropriate and brought back to Council for formal consideration.

Conclusion

Council has developed a Draft Maroondah Affordable and Social Policy 2018 involving considerable background research and consultation. Council authorisation is sought to release this draft Policy for public exhibition before being formally considered for adoption.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Draft Maroondah Affordable and Social Housing Policy - June 2018

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That

1.       COUNCIL authoriseS the release of the DRAFT MAROONDAH AFFORDABLE AND SOCIAL HOUSING POLICY 2018 on public exhibition from 29 JUNE 2018 TO 27 July 2018 AND receive SUBMISSIONS.

2.       follOWING EXHIBITION AND CONSIDERATION OF ANY SUBMISSIONS received, THE MAROONDAH AFFORDABLE AND SOCIAL HOUSING POLICY 2018 WILL BE PRESENTED TO cOUNCIL FOR formal consideration.

3.       Council thanks the wide range of stakeholders who have provided their input to inform development of this draft policy.

 


acting DIRECTOR Strategy & Community grant meyer

 

Local Government Community Satisfaction Survey Results 2018

Item 4

 

Purpose

To communicate the 2018 results for Maroondah City Council as part of its participation in the Local Government Community Satisfaction Survey

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that consider the needs and aspirations of all ages and population groups. Council will provide strong and responsive leadership, ensuring transparency, while working with the community to advocate for and ‘champion’ local needs.

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

8.1 Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

8.2 Ensure responsible and sustainable management of Maroondah’s resources, assets, infrastructure and natural environment

8.8 Undertake inclusive engagement and consultation using accessible and tailored approaches to consider the needs and aspirations of different age and population groups

Priority Action 2017-2018:

Not applicable

Background

Each year Local Government Victoria (LGV) coordinates and auspices a State-wide Local Government Community Satisfaction Survey throughout Victorian local government areas.

 

The main objectives of the survey are to assess the performance of Maroondah City Council across a range of measures and to seek insight into ways to provide improved or more effective service delivery.

 

The survey also provides local government authorities with a means to fulfil some of their statutory reporting requirements (via the Local Government Performance Reporting Framework) whilst also acting as a feedback mechanism to Local Government Victoria.

The survey was conducted by independent market research firm, JWS Research, on behalf of the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning. In 2018, 64 of the 79 Councils throughout Victoria participated in this survey.

 

The survey was conducted from 1 February to 30 March 2018. A total of 400 respondents in Maroondah over the age of 18 years (95% confidence interval) were interviewed via telephone by the market researchers. Maroondah was this year benchmarked as part of an overall Metropolitan group, excluding interface Councils.

Survey questions are standardised across the state which means that their wording may not always reflect the localised focus of service delivery. The survey questions also only provide limited contextual information which could mean that respondents provide ratings based on issues that are beyond Council’s direct influence.

Changes in weighted ratings between years are often not statistically significant. Movement of ratings by 1-2 points are generally not statistically significant. An Indexed mean used (adjusted to a base to allow comparison with other Councils).

Issue / discussion

Largely improved results for Maroondah were achieved in the 2018 survey, with Council continuing to perform well in comparison to Statewide and Metro average results.

 

Some highlights include:

·        The overall performance rating for Council increased by four points to 67 (from 63)

·        The Council direction rating increased five points to 58 (from 53)

·        Of the core measures, there were minor increases for 'community consultation' (55 to 56), 'making community decisions' (58 to 59), 'sealed local roads' (66 to 68) and 'customer service' (70 to 73). For all core measures, Maroondah was above the state wide average and above or similar to the metro average.

·        Of the service performance measures, significant increases were achieved for 'recreation facilities' (77 to 80) and 'local streets and footpaths' (60 to 63).

·        Statistically higher performance results compared to 2017 were achieved for 'overall performance' and 'Council direction'

·        Statistically lower performance results compared to 2017 were shown for 'elderly support services' (68 to 65) and 'disadvantaged support services' (63 to 58). It is possible that these ratings may be linked to sector changes beyond Council's control such as the introduction of NDIS and the My Aged Care framework.

·        Those aged 18-34 and over 65 are most favourably disposed towards Council, whilst those aged 50-64 are least favourably disposed.

Further details on results achieved can be found in the attachment to this report.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

 

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

The Local Government Community Satisfaction Survey is a useful tool and one of many engagement methods used by Council to track its performance and community perceptions of its service delivery.

Information on Council’s performance relating to this survey has been placed on Council’s website – www.maroondah.vic.gov.au

Conclusion

Maroondah City Council has achieved largely improved results in the 2018 Local Government Community Satisfaction Survey. Council has also continued to perform well in comparison to Statewide and Metro average results.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Local Government Community Satisfaction Survey 2018 - Summary Results for Maroondah City Council

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL NOTES THE 2018 RESULTS FROM THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT COMMUNITY SATISFACTION SURVEY

  


DOCUMENTS FOR SEALING

 

 

Letter Under Seal - Recognition of 2018 Queen's Birthday Honours

ITEM 1

 

Background

Council Policy re: Honours / Recognition of Milestones & Achievements provides that recipients of Australian Honours who reside within the City of Maroondah, be also acknowledged on such recognition by Council and presented with a Letter Under Seal.

 

The Australian Honours comprise:

·        Order of Australia medal,

·        Australian Bravery decorations,

·        Military medals for Gallantry and for Distinguished and Conspicuous Service,

·        Commemorative medals,

·                Meritorious Service and Long Service medals, and

·        Public Service Medals

 

The Honours List is published twice a year, i.e. Australia Day (January) and Queen’s Birthday (June). Council has been made aware of the following recognition given in the 2018 Queen’s Birthday Honours List, as recently announced by the Governor General:

 

Mr Bruce Sands Hill (Heathmont resident) – awarded Medal of the Order of Australia for service to Australian rules football.

 

Mr Alan Francis Hodgkin, (Bayswater resident) – awarded Australian Fire Service Medal for service to the Country Fire Authority (CFA)

 

Mrs Suzanne Margaret MacLeod, (Ringwood resident) – awarded Medal of the Order of Australia for service to the Scottish community of Victoria

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT COUNCIL SIGNS AND SEALS LETTERS OF CONGRATULATIONS IN RECOGNITION OF THE 2018 QUEEN’S BIRTHDAY HONOURS AWARDED TO:

1.       MR BRUCE SANDS HILL AND MRS SUZANNE MARGARET MACLEOD, RECIPIENTS OF THE MEDAL OF THE ORDER OF AUSTRALIA (OAM)

2.       MR ALAN FRANCIS HODGKIN, RECIPIENT OF THE AUSTRALIAN FIRE SERVICE MEDAL (AFSM)

 


DOCUMENTS FOR SEALING

 

 

Letter Under Seal - Maroondah Photographic Society - 60th Anniversary

ITEM 2

 

Letters under seal

Background

Maroondah Photographic Society is celebrating its 60th Anniversary at a milestone event on Friday 20 July 2018.

Since its inception, the Society has developed into an intergenerational group ranging in age from the mid-20s - late 70s. The Society promotes and develops the art of photography by staging competitions and public exhibitions (digital and print), and endeavours to engage more closely with the wider community.

The Society’s mission is to contribute to the health and vibrancy of the Maroondah community by providing an outlet for the people of Maroondah to enhance and develop their photographic skills, and to participate in the advancement of photography as both an art and a science.

In keeping with Council’s Honours/Recognition of Milestones Policy, it is appropriate Council recognises this significant milestone with a Letter Under Seal.

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

That council signs and seals A LETTER FOR THE MAROONDAH PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY IN RECOGNITION OF THE SOCIETY’S 60TH ANNIVERSARY