2014 Maroondah Logo RGB.jpg

 

 

Councillor

(as addressed)

 

 

The next Council Meeting will be held in the Council Chamber, Braeside Avenue, Ringwood, on Monday 26 February 2018, commencing at 7:30pm and your presence is requested.

 

 

Yours faithfully

SKozlows.jpg

 

Steve Kozlowski

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

Note:

This meeting is being streamed live on the internet and recorded.

Every care is taken to maintain privacy and attendees are advised they may be recorded.

 

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Council Chamber
is fitted with a Hearing Aid Induction Loop

 

Switch Hearing Aid to ‘T’ for Reception

 

City Offices

Braeside Avenue, Ringwood, 3134

Postal

PO Box 156, Ringwood 3134

DX 38068, Ringwood

Telephone

1300 88 22 33

 

 

Facsimile

Email

Web

 

Service Centres

Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS): 131 450

National Relay Service (NRS): 133 677

(03) 9298 4345

maroondah@maroondah.vic.gov.au

www.maroondah.vic.gov.au

 

Croydon: Civic Square

REALM: 179 Maroondah Hwy, Ringwood

 


 

 

 


ORDER OF BUSINESS

1.       Prayer

2.       Acknowledgment of Country

3.       Apologies  

4.       Declaration of Interests

5.       Confirmation of Minutes of the Ordinary Council Meeting held on Monday 18 December 2017.

6.       Public Questions

7.       Officers’ Reports

Director Corporate Services

1.       Attendance Report                                                                                                    5

2.       Reports of Assembly of Councillors                                                                         7

3.       Financial Report: Six Months Ending 31 December 2017                                     10

4.       E-Waste Ban and Banning of Single Use Lightweight Shopping Bags                 16

5.       Councillors Quarterly Expense and Reimbursement Report - October to December 2017                                                                                                                        19

6.       Local Government Bill – Exposure Draft                                                                22

Director Operations, Assets & Leisure

1.       Community Facilities Dedication Nomination                                                         26

2.       Community Assistance Fund                                                                                  29

Director Strategy & Community

1.       Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017/18) - Progress Report as at 31 December 2017                                                                                                                        32

2.       Local Government Performance Reporting Framework - Quarter 2 Results 2017/18                                                                                                                                34

3.       Maroondah Planning Scheme - Amendment C116 Jubilee Park Heritage and Neighbourhood Character Planning Controls                                                        37  

8.       Documents for Sealing

1.       Letters Under Seal - Recognition of 2018 Australia Day Honours                        52  

9.       Motions to Review   

10.     Late Item

11.     Requests / Leave of Absence

 

 

12.     In Camera

Director Operations, Assets & Leisure

1.       Tender Evaluation Report - Contract 20859 Minor Stormwater Drainage Maintenance

2.       Evaluation Report - Contract EC8310-2018 Supply of Electricity to Unmetered Public Lighting Sites (through MAV Procurement)

Director Strategy & Community

1.       Evaluation Report - Contract CT5388 Energy Performance Contracts  

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Attendance Report

Item 1

 

Purpose

To provide an opportunity for Councillors to report on Council activities undertaken since the last Ordinary Meeting of Council and forthcoming ward activities.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

Not Applicable

Issue / discussion

It is intended that the Mayor and Councillors be given the opportunity to present a verbal or written report updating Council on the activities they have undertaken in their role as Councillors and forthcoming ward activities.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

It is appropriate that Councillors formally report to Council upon the activities they have undertaken in their role as Councillors.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE REPORTS AS PRESENTED BY

COUNCILLORS

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Reports of Assembly of Councillors

Item 2

 

Purpose

To present the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings at the City Offices Ringwood, usually two weeks prior to the formal Council Meeting, and to note the issues discussed.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

An Assembly of Councillors, as defined under the Local Government Act 1989 [s.3], is a planned or scheduled meeting, comprising at least five (5) Councillors and one (1) member of Council staff, that considers matters that are intended or likely to be:

 

·        the subject of a decision of the Council; or

·        subject to the exercise of a delegated function, duty or power of Council

Examples of an Assembly of Councillors may include:

 

·        Councillor Briefings (which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings),

·        On-site inspections,

·        Consultative Meetings with residents, developers, consultants,

·        Panel Hearings conducted under s223 of the Act,

·        Meetings with local organisations, Government Departments, statutory authorities, and local politicians

Issue / discussion

As part of decision making processes at Maroondah, it is essential that Councillors are briefed on a range of issues which come before Council for consideration.  As a means of providing this information, Assembly of Councillors briefings are conducted.

 

Assemblies are also attended by Council Officers, and sometimes other specific advisors, to provide Councillors with a detailed knowledge and understanding of issues under consideration to a level of detail that would inhibit timely decision-making, that would not be possible in an open Council meeting, where decision-making related debate is governed by strict meeting procedures.

 

The intent of this report is to present the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings, and to note the items discussed.  This information is already available to the public upon request in accordance with the Local Government Act [s.80A].

 

This report and attachments formally table the information items previously covered by Councillors.

 

The ‘Public Record’ of the Assembly of Councillors briefings held on 18 December 2017, 5 February 2018 and 17 & 18 February 2018 is attached for information.

 

The items contained therein were noted.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

Assembly of Councillors briefings are important forums for advice and discussion, on what are often complex issues facing the municipality, in the lead up to formal decisions being made by Councillors at Council Meetings.  At Assemblies, or outside them, Councillors also have the opportunity of requesting additional information to assist in the decision making process.

 

It is appropriate that the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings at the City Offices Ringwood, usually two weeks prior to the formal Council Meeting, be noted at a formal meeting of Council.


 

 

Attachments

1.

2017 December 18 - Assembly of Councillors Public Record

2.

2018 February 05 - Assembly of Councillors Public Record

3.

2018 February 17 & 18 - Assembly of Councillors Public Record

 

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE PUBLIC RECORD OF THE ASSEMBLY OF COUNCILLORS BRIEFINGS HELD ON 18 December 2017, 5 February 2018 and 17 & 18 February 2018

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Financial Report: Six Months Ending 31 December 2017

Item 3

 

Purpose

To present Council with a snapshot of Council’s financial performance for the six months ending 31 December 2017. Attachment 1 provides the full financial report.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in the Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area: A well governed and empowered community.

 

Vision Statement: In the year 2040, Maroondah will be an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered. Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs.

 

Key Directions 2017 - 2021:

8.1       Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable.

Background

In accordance with Sections 136, 137 and 138 of the Local Government Act 1989, Council is required each quarter to consider the financial performance of the municipality against budget for the year to date (YTD).

 

This requirement is not a substitute for the more frequent range of detailed financial reports that continue to be provided to Council management and the Audit and Risk Advisory Committee.

 

The attached financial statements contain an Income Statement (Operating Statement); Balance Sheet; Statement of Cash Flows and a Statement of Capital Works. The Income Statement is presented per accounting standards by nature.

 

The statements have been prepared on the basis of accrual accounting (i.e. including significant accruals) and non-consolidation (i.e. excludes the results of the Eastern Regional Library Corporation and Section 86 Committees of Management).

 

The statements provide comparisons between actual results and the YTD forecast budget.

Issue / discussion

The following is a summary of the financial position for the six months ending 31 December 2017. A detailed report is attached to this document.
1. OPERATING PERFORMANCE

          1.1 Overall Operating Performance

 

YTD

YTD

YTD

Forecast

Adopted

 

Forecast

Actual

 Var

Budget

Budget

 

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

$’000

Operating

Income

106,827

106,878

51

130,022

129,320

Expenses

(62,405)

(61,476)

929

(124,949)

(124,664)

Underlying Surplus (Deficit)

44,422

45,403

980

5,073

4,656

Capital

Grants - Capital (recurrent and non-recurrent)

1,035

1,047

12

4,353

1,934

Comprehensive result

45,457

46,450

993

9,425

6,590

 

For the six months ended 31 December 2017, Council has recorded an underlying surplus before capital revenues of $45.4 million, which is $0.98 million ahead of the year to date forecast budget; primarily related to unexpended funds during the period, as outlined in section 1.3 of the report.

 

 

1.2 Income YTD Forecast Budget variances

 

The table at 1.2 illustrates how each income stream is performing year to date against forecast, by variance. Key variances of note include:

 

Favourable Variances:

-     User Fees ($61k) – relates mostly to higher than anticipated sales at leisure facilities.

 

Unfavourable Variances:

-     Statutory Fees and Charges ($46k) – associated with lower than forecast performance in the Planning, Health and Local Laws area, most of which relates to traffic infringements.

 

 

 

 

1.3 Expenses YTD Forecast Budget variances

 

 

The table at 1.3 illustrates how each expense stream is tracking year to date against forecast, by variance. Key variances of note include:

 

Favourable Variances:

-     Materials and Services ($758k) – Driven by differences in the timing of expenses across the organisation. Areas of council contributing to the variance include Operations ($240k), Leisure ($215k) and Community Services ($141k) amongst others.

 

-     Contractors ($176k) – Driven by differences in the timing of expenses across the organisation. Areas of council contributing to the variance include Integrated Planning ($74k), Operations ($60k) and Finance and Governance ($43k) amongst others.

 

 

 

 

2. CAPITAL WORKS

 

2.1 Capital works YTD expenditure cumulative

 

* YTD Actual expenditure includes Carried Forwards

** Forecast Budget expenditure includes Carried Forwards

 

The Capital Expenditure program for 2017/18 is $34.9m. A carry forward amount from 2016/17 of $4.28m is included in the forecast for the current year.

 

The chart above indicates how Council is performing year to date against the forecast, as well as how we are tracking to achieve the year end target of $34.9m. Currently Council has spent 26.7% of its forecast at the end of the second quarter and plans to meet target by year end.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. RATES

 

3.1 Actual rates outstanding balance by month

The chart above compares the rates outstanding as at 31 December 2017 to the same time last financial year, with our collection rates following a similar pattern to previous years based on rate instalments occurring at set times throughout the financial period. Council has one of the highest debt recovery performances when compared to other local government authorities.

 

Financial / economic issues

As presented in this report and accompanying financial statements.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

The 31 December 2017 YTD results are favourable and provide a solid foundation for achieving Council’s 2017/2018 services and advocacy programs.

 

 

 

Attachments

1.

26 February 2018 - Council Meeting Report - Financial report appendix 6 months 31 December 2017

2.

26 February 2018 - Council Meeting Report - Financial report appendix 2 - report analytics

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE REPORT ON THE FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE AGAINST BUDGET FOR THE SIX MONTHS ENDING 31 DECEMBER 2017

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

E-Waste Ban and Banning of Single Use Lightweight Shopping Bags

Item 4

 

Purpose

For Council to endorse the MAV submissions on the e-waste landfill ban and banning of single use lightweight shopping bags.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:

A clean, green and sustainable community.

Our Vision: 

 

In 2040, Maroondah is a leafy green community with high levels of waste diversion and sustainable approaches to infrastructure development, urban design and management of natural resources. Our community is resilient and has the knowledge, capacity and resources to make sustainable lifestyle choices

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

Provide leadership and adopt sustainable innovative approaches to limit consumption, prevent litter, reduce waste to landfill and encourage reuse and recycling of resources.

Build the capacity of households and businesses to behave more sustainably, reduce waste and minimise consumption of natural resources.

Background

E-waste

The Victorian Labour Party committed to an e-waste landfill ban in the lead up to the 2014 State Election.  The definition of e-waste for the ban includes any device that requires a power cord or a battery to operate and that is no longer wanted or useful, including phones, computer and computer accessories, and even kitchen equipment such as toasters.

 

The Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning has released the Policy Impact Assessment (PIA) and was seeking community, sector and industry input by the 25 January 2018 on the details of its proposed ban on e-waste from landfill.

 

Single use light weight plastic bags

Similarly, the Victorian Labour Government has committed to ban single-use light weight plastic shopping bags. The Victorian Government has released a discussion paper, “Reducing the impacts of plastics on the Victorian environment”.  The Government is seeking input into the policy which aims to reduce the impacts of plastic pollution in Victoria. 

 

 

 

Issue / discussion

The MAV circulated a draft submission to Councils on the banning of e-waste and reducing the impacts of plastics on the Victorian environment.  Council officers are supportive of the majority of the draft submissions. Copies of both MAV submissions are attached to this report.

 

The e-waste ban is due to commence 1 July 2018. MCC officers recommended to the MAV that the following be included in the submission:

·        that e-waste be collected as part of the hard waste collection to supplement the proposal for there items to be taken to a transfer station;

·        that the collection network distance be accessible for the community; and

·        to strengthen the submission in relation to the cost impost on Councils which should be funded by the State Government.

 

In relation to reducing the impacts of plastics on the Victorian environment, officers made the following comments:

·        rather than increasing the penalties for littering that are already relatively high, increasing the number of EPA litter enforcement officers would be a more effective with a whole of State approach, similar to the pilot project which was undertaken a couple of years ago;

·        the thick plastic bags not be banned as these can be used multiple times and are not as easily windblown as lightweight plastic shopping bags; and

·        plastic straws are not seen as a major litter problem and from a health and wasp perspective that they be retained.

Financial / economic issues

It is highly likely that the State Government will pass the cost onto Councils for the collection of e-waste.  The cost is unknown at this stage given the complexity of the product range and the uncertainty in the associated commodity market but it is likely to cost Council between $50,000 and $100,000 per annum.  There will be no cost to Council for the banning of lightweight shopping bags.

Environmental / amenity issues

The reduction of plastics into the environment should result in less plastic bags ending up into open spaces and waterways.  There is a wide range of research which has been undertaken which demonstrates plastic bags entering waterways can have a detrimental effect on marine life.

 

 

 

 

Social / community issues

A consistent approach Australia wide to plastic bags will result in the best outcome for the community, mindful that research in the States which has banned plastic shopping bags have seen a significant increase associated with plastic bin liner purchases.

Community consultation

The community has had the opportunity to comment on both the Policy Impact Assessment Waste Management Policy (E-waste) and Reducing the impacts of plastics of the Victorian environment via their respective websites.

Conclusion

The MAV submissions on both the e-waste ban and reducing the impacts of plastics on the Victorian environment are supported by officers as addressing most issues in relation to these two State Government policies.

 

 

Attachments

1.

MAV submission Managing e-waste in Victoria Policy Impact Assessment

2.

MAV submission Reducing the impacts of plastics on the Victorian environment - Jan 2018

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL ENDORSE THE MAV SUBMISSIONS FOR THE E-WASTE BAN AND REDUCING THE IMPACTS OF PLASTICS ON THE VICTORIAN ENVIRONMENT

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Councillors Quarterly Expense and Reimbursement Report - October to December 2017

Item 5

 

Purpose

To provide a report to the community on Councillor expenses.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community.

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an empowered community that is actively engaged in council decision making through processes that consider the needs and aspirations of all ages and population groups.  Council will provide strong and responsive leadership, ensuring transparency, while working with the community to advocate for and ‘champion’ local needs.

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable.

Background

The Councillor Expenses, Support and Reimbursement Policy was adopted by Council on 27 March 2017.

In accordance with Section 75 of the Local Government Act 1989, Council is required to reimburse a Councillor for expenses incurred whilst performing his or her duties as a Councillor. Council is also required to adopt and maintain a Policy in relation to the reimbursement of expenses for Councillors. The Policy provides guidance for the payment of reimbursements of expenses and the provision of resources, facilities and other support to the Mayor and Councillors to enable them to discharge their duties.

 

Council also publishes in its Annual Report the details of the expenses, including reimbursement of expenses for each Councillor and member of a Council Committee paid by the Council. The details of the expenses for the 2016/17 financial year are set out in the 2016/17 Annual Report.

Issue / discussion

This is a standard Governance reporting item.

Financial / economic issues

A budget of $102,000 in the 2017/2018 financial year exists for the expenses and reimbursement of Councillors.

 

Councillor

TR

($)

CM

($)

CC

($)

IC

($)

CT

($)

CCA

($)

Total

Oct to Dec

($)

YTD

Total

July to Dec

$

Tony Dib JP

Mayor July-Nov 2017

 

144.61

*3,134

0

51.93

0

0

3,330.54

8,464.99

Paul Macdonald

 

0

0

0

39.17

0

496.17

535.34

1,095.84

Kylie Spears

 

0

0

0

31.86

0

173.61

205.47

660.57

Nora Lamont

Mayor Nov 2017 – Nov 2018

 

0

*1,500

0

34.76

0

203.00

1,737.76

2,082.71

Samantha Marks

 

0

0

0

29.10

0

0

29.10

100.65

Mike Symon

Deputy Mayor

 

1,757.27

290.98

0

33.28

416.85

378.52

2,876.90

4,039.10

Marijke Graham

 

0

0

0

26.43

440.00

396.70

863.13

1,361.73

Michael Macdonald

 

0

0

0

29.42

272.73

177.27

479.42

602.62

Rob Steane

 

0

0

0

32.53

570.35

23.00

625.88

2,053.28

 

Legend: TR-Travel, CM-Car Mileage (* a budget allocation of $12,000 is allocated to the Office of the Mayor for the provision of a vehicle in 17/18), CC-Child Care, IC-Information and Communication expenses, CT- Conferences and Training expenses, CCA-Civic and Community Attendance

 

Note: No expenses were paid by Council including reimbursements to members of Council Committees during the year.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

Not Applicable

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL NOTES THE COUNCILLORS EXPENSE AND REIMBURSEMENT REPORT FOR OCTOBER TO DECEMBER 2017

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

LOCAL GOVERNMENT BILL – EXPOSURE DRAFT

Item 6

 

Purpose

To consider making a submission to the Minister for Local Government in response to the Local Government Bill Exposure Draft released by the State Government on 12 December 2017.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs.

 

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

 

8.1       Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

On 12 December 2017, the Victorian Government released an Exposure Draft of the Local Government Bill, giving community members, Councils, and peak bodies the opportunity to provide feedback before the Bill is introduced into Parliament. Submissions received will be considered in the further development and final drafting of the Bill.

 

The Local Government Bill Exposure Draft Bill proposes to repeal and replace the current Local Government Act 1989 with a modern, principle based legislative framework for the establishment and administration of a system of local government in Victoria, that clearly outlines the roles and responsibilities of councils and allows for greater innovation and collaboration. Much detail is still to be determined, which in due course will be set by Regulation or Ministerial Guidelines.

 

Once finalised, it is intended that the Bill be introduced to Parliament in early 2018, with a view to a new Local Government Act commencing from mid-2018.

 

Release of the Exposure Draft marks the fourth and final stage of public consultation on the Local Government Act Review before the Bill enters the Parliament.

 

The Draft Bill seeks to:

·        provide a better understanding of the role of Councils as democratically elected bodies

·        encourage Victorians to participate more as candidates, voters and citizens in Council activities and contribute to council strategic visions and plans

·        drive more autonomous and outcome focused Councils

·        encourage Councils to embrace innovative and collaborative arrangements that increase organisational efficiency and deliver public value for residents

·        provide a sound framework for the sector to become more efficient and enterprising in its local governance.

The closing date for submissions has now been extended from Friday 23 February to Friday 16 March 2018.

Issue / discussion

The Draft Bill is comprehensive and contains many reforms. The following is an overview of ten major changes, which are proposed with the intent of strengthening local government in Victoria:

 

1

Mayors will provide greater leadership to Councils by adopting more extensive responsibilities and undertaking a commitment to report progress annually to their communities on the Council Four Year Plan.

2

Consistency of Council representative structures will be improved by establishing a consistent formula for determining Councillor numbers and having Councils unsubdivided or comprise uniform Councillor numbers per ward.

3

Increased participation, formal voting and fairness in Council elections by adopting a consistent voting method for all elections (attendance, postal or electronic).

4

Councils will undertake deliberative community engagement processes before adopting a four-year Council Plan and four-year Budget so communities better inform strategic directions and spending priorities of Council.

5

Councils will integrate strategic planning and reporting and adopt a long-term approach, comprising a four-year Council Plan, a four-year Council Budget, a long-term community vision, 10-year financial plan and 10-year asset plan.

6

The Act will strengthen the Minister’s powers to deal with individual Councillors who are contributing to or causing serious governance failures at a Council.

7

All Councils will have a CEO employment and remuneration policy and an independent advisory mechanism to guide recruitment, contractual arrangements and performance monitoring of the CEO.

8

Councils will have greater autonomy with prescriptive decision-making processes replaced by a requirement to comply with high-level principles requiring transparency, accountability and sound financial management.

9

Financial sustainability of Councils will be strengthened as the Act reinvigorates their capacity to innovate and collaborate with other Councils, other government agencies and the private sector.

10

The new Act will establish a single method for valuing land, clarify exemptions from rates and increase transparency in the levying of differential rates.

 

In December 2017 Councillors were sent advice of the Bill and a copy of the Local Government Victoria document - A New Local Government Act for Victoria.

 

Councillors were also recently provided with a detailed briefing at the Assembly of Councillors held on 5 February 2018.

 

Attached to this report is an overview of proposed changes from the 1989 Act to the 2018 Bill, with an indication of Maroondah’s proposed stance to form the basis of a formal submission.

 

It should also be noted that although the closing date for the lodgement of submissions has   been extended from 23 February 2018 to16 March 2018, widely held concerns within the local government sector is that there has been insufficient time allotted to consider the Draft Bill since its release by the State Government on 12 December 2017.

 

Typically, in the past, a complete rewrite of major legislation has been allowed to lay over until the following session of Parliament to allow consideration of unintended consequences and the preparation of amendments. The new Local Government Act is a major piece of legislation affecting all Victorians and therefore it is considered appropriate to seek more time to consider the proposals prior to them being legislated. These views will also be included as part of Council’s submission.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

Local Government Bill Exposure Draft marks the final stage of public consultation on the Local Government Act Review before the Bill enters the State Parliament.

 

Councillors have been briefed on the significant changes proposed, and it is now appropriate for Council to consider submitting a formal submission in line with the views as expressed in the attachment to this report.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Maroondah's Draft Response to Local Government Bill Exposure Draft

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT

1.    a formal submission to the Local Government Bill EXPOSURE DRAFT, REFLECTING COUNCIL’S VIEWS AS ATTACHED TO THIS REPORT, BE PREPARED AND SUBMITTED WITH LOCAL GOVERNMENT VICTORIA

2.    Council conveys its views on the Local Government Bill Exposure Draft to all local State Members of Parliament

 

  


DIRECTOR Operations, Assets & Leisure Adam Todorov

 

Community Facilities Dedication Nomination

Item 1

 

Purpose

The purpose of this report is to brief Council on the receipt of a nomination for the proposed dedication of the main oval at Mullum Mullum Reserve, Ringwood and the process for consideration.

 

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in the Maroondah 2040:  Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report:

 

Outcome Area: Safe, healthy and active community

 

Our Vision: In 2040 Maroondah will be a safe, healthy and active community with local opportunities provided for people of all ages and abilities to have high levels of social, emotional and physical wellbeing.

 

Key Directions 2017 – 2021

 

1.21 Support and empower local community groups, sporting clubs and special interest groups across Maroondah

 

Background

From time to time Council receives requests from individuals and community groups to name public open space and other community facilities after an individual, a family or an organisation. Naming public open space or a community facility is a perpetual honour and Council must ensure that in each case the dedication is in all circumstances appropriate. In March 2016, Council endorsed a Community Facilities Dedication Policy to establish clear parameters for when a request for naming a community facility will be considered, set criteria for assessment of requests and a process for the submission, assessment, consultation, and approval of requests.

 

Issue / discussion

A nomination has been received for the proposed dedication of the main oval at Mullum Mullum Reserve. In accordance with the Community Facilities Dedication Policy an initial suitability assessment of the requests by a panel of Council staff has been undertaken. The panel has recommended that the proposal proceed to the community consultation phase of the policy process.

 

The Norwood Cricket Club in conjunction with the Norwood Football Club have proposed that the main oval at Mullum Mullum Reserve be named the David Jamieson Oval in honour of David Jamieson. Council has received four letters in support of the Norwood Cricket Club nomination. The letters were received from The Ringwood and District Cricket Association Umpires, The Norwood Sporting Club Management Committee, the Norwood Football Club and an individual resident.

 

 

David Jamieson was a respected local school teacher who founded the Norwood High School Cricket and Football Clubs and was instrumental in their evolution into a thriving community sporting club at Mullum Reserve. His contribution extended beyond the roles of teacher, club founder, coach, committee and mentor to that of a highly respected community leader.

 

Financial / economic issues

All costs associated with the consultation process and any subsequent installation of signage will be funded from existing operational and capital budgets.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

 

Social / community issues

The Community Facilities Dedication Policy allows Council and the community to recognise extraordinary contributions to the Maroondah Community.

 

Community consultation

A letter of notification will be sent to the listed groups and individuals below, outlining the proposed name, rationale for dedication and process for objection. Recipients will be afforded a minimum 28 days to respond in writing to the Chief Executive Officer during the period 1 March 2018 to 29 March 2018.

 

The following groups and individuals will receive notification:

·        Norwood Sporting Group;

·        Ringwood U3A;

·        Norwood Secondary College; and

·        Neighbouring residents

It should be noted that there is no known living next of kin of David Jamieson.

Conclusion

A nomination has been received for the proposed dedication of the Mullum Mullum Reserve main oval in honour of David Jamieson. In accordance with the Community Facilities Dedication Policy, the request has undertaken an initial suitability assessment by a panel of Council staff and has been recommended to proceed to Council for approval to progress the dedication proposal to community consultation.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

1.

Communty Facilities Dedication Policy 2016

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

that council SUPPORTs the following nomination to proceed to the consultation phase of the Community Facilities Dedication Process:

 

1.       the main oval at mullum mullum reserve, ringwood be named The David Jamieson Oval

 

 


DIRECTOR Operations, Assets & Leisure Adam Todorov

 

Community Assistance Fund

Item 2

 

Purpose

To provide Council with a summary of the Community Assistance Fund for the six month period 1 July 2017 – 31 December 2017.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in the Maroondah 2040:  Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report:

 

Outcome Area:  Safe, healthy and active community

 

Vision Statement:  In 2040 Maroondah will be a safe, healthy and active community with local opportunities provided for people of all ages and abilities to have high levels of social emotional and physical wellbeing.

 

Key Directions 2017 - 2018

 

1.21   Support and empower local community groups, sporting clubs and special interest groups across Maroondah.

Background

The Community Assistance Fund provides financial support, being 25% of costs to a maximum value of $350, to assist individuals to meet new challenges and strive to exceed excellence in their chosen sport, profession or arts interest.

 

The Community Assistance Fund also aims to provide financial assistance to not for profit local community groups, to a maximum of $1,000 to assist in meeting unexpected expenses which are unable to be deferred to Council’s Community Grants Scheme for consideration.

 

The Community Assistance Fund also provides for in-kind support to assist community organisations to meet costs associated with participation in community activities such as fund raising and charity days.

 

All grant applications are assessed according to set criteria and funding recommendations based on a funding matrix and approved at monthly Assembly of Councillors meetings.

 

The Community Assistance Fund is the only scheme available offering funding opportunities for individual Maroondah residents.

Issue / discussion

During the funding period 1 July 2017 – 31 December 2017, twelve individual applications received funding.  One in-kind application was approved.

 

Community Assistance Fund applications have been received from a range of ages and disciplines which demonstrates diversity of interests in Maroondah and the high level of achievement being reached in the Maroondah community.


The following is a summary of successful Community Assistance Fund applicants for the period 1 July 2017 to 31 December 2017.

 

Individuals

Resident of:

Purpose of Funding

Ringwood East

Selected to compete at the Pacific School Games (Diving) held in Adelaide

Ringwood East

Selected to compete at the Comen Cup (Synchronised Swimming) held in Portugal

Croydon

Selected to compete at the Australian National Inline Hockey Championships held in Moe

Heathmont

Selected to compete at the Australian National Inline Hockey Championships held in Moe

Warranwood

Selected to participate in international Table Tennis training held in Germany

Ringwood North

Selected to compete at the ITF World Team Championships (tennis) held in USA

Ringwood

Selected to compete at the Pacific School Games (Touch Football Championships) held in Adelaide

Croydon

Selected to compete at the Christian Football Federation of Australia National Titles held in Sydney

Ringwood

Selected to compete at the Christian Football Federation of Australia National Titles held in Sydney

Bayswater North

Selected to compete at the World Dance Titles held in Germany

Warranwood

Selected to compete at the Pacific School Games (Track and Field) held in Adelaide

Croydon North

Selected to compete at the Athletics Australia All Schools Championships held in Adelaide

 

Organisations

Organisation

Purpose of Funding

$ Value

Nil

 

 

 

In-Kind

Organisation

Activity Description

In-Kind Support

$ Value

Rotary Club of Croydon Inc.

Charity Golf Day

Use of Dorset Golf Course

5,000

 

Financial / economic issues

The budget for the 2017/2018 Community Assistance Fund was set at $21,000 with $3,813 expended for the 6-month period 1 July 2017 to 31 December 2017 for individuals and organisations.

 

The in-kind value for the period between 1 July 2017 and 31 December 2017 is $5,000.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

The Community Assistance Fund has been developed to provide a financial contribution to assist community groups with urgent or unforeseen costs and to assist individuals to meet costs associated with participation in community activities such as sporting competitions, self development initiatives or arts interests.  The in-kind component is to assist community organisations meet costs associated with participation in community activities such as fund raising, charity days etc.

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

The report provides details to Council pertaining to the Community Assistance Fund Grant scheme 1 July 2017 – 31 December 2017 and provides a list of individuals and organisations who received financial support through this funding program. 

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THIS REPORT

  


DIRECTOR Strategy & Community Phil Turner

 

Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017/18) - Progress Report as at 31 December 2017

Item 1

 

Purpose

To provide an update on the progress of 2017/18 priority actions identified in the Council Plan 2017-2021 as at 31 December 2017.

 

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our future together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that consider the needs and aspirations of all ages and population groups. Council will provide strong and responsive leadership, ensuring transparency, while working with the community to advocate for and ‘champion’ local needs.

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

8.1 Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

8.2 Ensure responsible and sustainable management of Maroondah’s resources, assets, infrastructure and natural environment

8.4 Foster a culture of innovation, cooperation, commitment, communication and continuous improvement that positions Maroondah City Council as a leader in local government

Priority Action 2017-2018:

Not applicable

Background

The Council Plan 2017-2021 is Maroondah City Council’s key medium-term strategic document that sets key directions and priority actions to work towards the long-term community vision outlined in Maroondah 2040: Our future together.

The Council Plan plays a vital role in shaping Maroondah’s future over a four-year period. It identifies both challenges and opportunities for our community at local and regional level within the context of the community’s long-term community vision, Maroondah 2040: Our future together. It also forms the basis for Council to make decisions regarding resources and priorities in response to community needs and aspirations.

The Council Plan is implemented through a service delivery planning process, and outcomes are measured and reported regularly. Achievements are reported back to Council and the community through the Maroondah City Council Annual Report at the end of each financial year.

 

Issue / discussion

Each year, Council identifies a range of priority actions for implementing the four-year Council Plan. This helps to ensure that the Plan continues to be aligned with Maroondah 2040: Our future together, the community’s long-term vision, and is responsive to community needs and expectations.

 

The Council Plan is divided into eight future outcome areas, each with a set of four-year key directions (strategies), four years of priority actions, strategic indicators and supporting strategies and plans. The priority actions identified work towards the achievement of the key directions, and ultimately toward the outcomes and vision outlined in Maroondah 2040: Our future together.

 

The attached report identifies the progress made by Council this financial year in working towards the delivery of the 2017/18 priority actions identified in the Council Plan 2017-2021.

 

As at 31 December 2017, 33 of the 2017/18 Council Plan priority actions were underway, one was yet to commence, and one was deferred as it is subject to external funding.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

The attached report identifies that Council has already made excellent progress in working towards the delivery of Council Plan priority actions for 2017/18.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Council Plan 2017-2021 - Progress Report - Q2 2017-18 - As at 31 December 2018

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL NOTES THE PROGRESS MADE TOWARDS THE DELIVERY OF 2017/18 PRIORITY ACTIONS WITHIN THE COUNCIL PLAN 2017-2021 AS AT 31 DECEMBER 2017

 


DIRECTOR Strategy & Community Phil Turner

 

Local Government Performance Reporting Framework - Quarter 2 Results 2017/18

Item 2

 

Purpose

To provide a report of Council’s Local Government Performance Reporting Framework (LGPRF) service performance information for the first six months of the 2017/18 financial year (1 July 2017 to 31 December 2017).

 

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our future together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that consider the needs and aspirations of all ages and population groups. Council will provide strong and responsive leadership, ensuring transparency, while working with the community to advocate for and ‘champion’ local needs.

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

8.2     Ensure responsible and sustainable management of Maroondah’s resources, assets, infrastructure and natural environment

8.4     Foster a culture of innovation, cooperation, commitment, communication and continuous improvement that positions Maroondah City Council as a leader in local government

Priority Action 2017-2018:

Not Applicable

Background

The LGPRF is a mandatory reporting system developed by Local Government Victoria which was introduced in 2014 to ensure all Victorian Councils are measuring and reporting on their performance in a consistent way.

The LGPRF is a State Government initiative aimed at ensuring transparency and accountability of the local government sector performance to ratepayers and to provide a meaningful set of information to the public.

The framework is made up of service performance, financial performance and sustainability measures, along with a governance and management checklist. Together these components build a comprehensive picture of local government performance.

These measures are reported in Council’s Annual Report each year via the Report of Operations and Performance Statement sections as required by the Local Government (Planning and Reporting) Regulations 2014 and associated elements of the Local Government Act 1989.

End of financial year results are also publicly released on the Victorian Government’s ‘Know Your Council’ website in November each year. This site provides information on the sector and enables users to benchmark the relative performance of Councils on LGPRF indicators.

Issue / discussion

Maroondah City Council continues to monitor LGPRF indicator results on a quarterly basis for service performance indicators and annually for financial performance and sustainable capacity indicators.

A report that outlines LGPRF service performance indicator results from the first six months of the 2017/18 financial year (1 July 2017 to 31 December 2017) is attached to this Council Report.

All but three of the service indicator measures are within the ‘expected range’ as defined by the framework for this quarter. Three indicators were not able to be measured during the quarter due to either scheduling of service delivery, or issues with new software systems.

It is important to note that much of the quarterly data collected will not necessarily reflect or be predictive of annual performance due to phasing of service delivery across the year and seasonal influences.

Maroondah City Council will continue to monitor its performance against LGPRF indicators and report on its performance quarterly to ensure accountability and transparency.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

End of financial year results will be publicly released in Council’s Annual Report in September 2018 and on the Victorian Government’s ‘Know Your Council’ website in November 2018.

Conclusion

LGPRF service performance indicators for the first six months of the 2017/18 financial year are presented in the attached report. It is important to note that many of these quarterly results will not necessarily reflect or be predictive of annual performance due to phasing of service delivery across the year and seasonal influences. Annual results for the 2017/18 financial year will be published in Council’s Annual Report and on the Victorian Government ‘Know Your Council’ website in November 2018.

 

 

Attachments

1.

LGPRF Service Performance Results - Q2 2017-18 - As at 31 December 2017

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL NOTES THE REPORT ON LOCAL GOVERNMENT PERFORMANCE REPORTING FRAMEWORK SERVICE PERFORMANCE INDICATORS FOR THE FIRST SIX MONTHS OF THE 2017/18 FINANCIAL YEAR

 

 


DIRECTOR Strategy & Community Phil Turner

 

Maroondah Planning Scheme - Amendment C116 Jubilee Park Heritage and Neighbourhood Character Planning Controls

Item 3

 

Purpose

Amendment C116 to the Maroondah Planning Scheme proposes to introduce statutory planning controls to the Jubilee Park area to protect properties identified with having significant heritage and neighbourhood character values.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  An attractive, thriving and well-built community.

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an attractive community with high quality residential and commercial areas incorporating infrastructure that meets the needs and aspirations of all ages and abilities. A diverse range of housing options are available and thriving activity centres provide a broad range of facilities and services that meet community needs.

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

6.10 Develop and implement an urban form that enhances the desirable attributes of Maroondah to protect and value ridgelines, vegetation, neighbourhood character, local history and cultural heritage.

Priority Actions:

One of the Council Plan’s priority actions 2017-2020 is to undertake a municipal wide review of Council’s neighbourhood character and heritage controls.

Key Direction 3.1, Action 3b of Maroondah’s Housing Strategy 2016 sets out the need to “Review neighbourhood character elements including heritage of the Jubilee Park area.” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Background

The Jubilee Park Study area was defined in the Jubilee Park Scoping Study, and it comprises approximately 220 properties south of Ringwood Major Activity centre.

 

 

Properties within the study area are covered by the following planning controls:

·                General Residential Zone-Schedule 1 (GRZ1)

·                Significant Landscape Overlay Schedule 4- (SLO4)

·                Heritage Overlay (6-12 Ellison Street and 32 Greenwood Avenue).

 

During the preparation of the Maroondah Housing Strategy in 2016, some residents of the Jubilee Park/Federation Park area expressed concerns about the impact of recent residential developments within the area.   A petition signed by 163 residents of Jubilee Park stated that “…without formal recognition of the unique neighbourhood character, heritage and vegetative nature of middle Jubilee Park surrounding Federation Estate and Jubilee Park Ovals, this pocket of Ringwood will lose its character, which is valued by both residents and the broader community.”

In a subsequent Council report dated 27 June 2016, the officers’ recommendation indicated that it was considered beyond the scope of the draft Housing Strategy to address in detail matters of heritage and neighbourhood character at that time.   An action was subsequently inserted in the adopted Maroondah Housing Strategy as follows: “Review neighbourhood character elements including heritage of the Jubilee Park area.” 

In August 2016 Council engaged Context Pty Ltd and Claire Scott Planning as independent consultants to undertake the Jubilee Park Heritage Review.

The findings of the Jubilee Park Heritage and Neighbourhood Character Study (The Study) provide the strategic basis for this Amendment.   The recommendations of the Study incorporate an integrated approach to the application of statutory controls, namely overlays and zoning provisions.

A Steering Committee was established comprising representatives from the Jubilee Park Residents Group, the Ringwood Historical Society and Council representatives.  The Committee provided valuable feedback on project methodology and community engagement. Their feedback was incorporated into the fieldwork and final output

 

A community consultation program was subsequently undertaken including:

·                Community input previously provided during the Housing Strategy was taken into consideration in fieldwork and findings of the Study.

·                A community values survey to gain an understanding of what residents valued about the study area. It was made available online and was open from 24 October 2016 to 25 November 2016. A total of 125 responses were received by Council. 75% of respondents indicated that heritage and neighbourhood character should be protected through the Maroondah Planning Scheme. 73% of the respondents expressed a desire to learn more about the planning controls available to protect the heritage and neighbourhood character of the area.

·                An information brochure circulated to residents to inform them of the Study.  The brochure included information on the outcomes from the community value survey.  A total of 267 brochures were distributed.

 

In summary, residents expressed strong support for preserving the heritage of the area including its current low rise scale.

A copy of the Jubilee Park Heritage and Neighbourhood Character Study Report February 2018 is contained in Attachment 1.

 

Issue / discussion

Further to the detailed assessment of the properties within the study area, three new planning controls are proposed for properties within the study area as follows.

 

1.       Heritage Overlay:  Introduction of heritage overlay provisions (HO) to fifty-nine (59) properties within the study area

 

-        Aims to protect heritage values

-        Includes demolition controls

 

2.       Neighbourhood Character Overlay (NCO): Introduction of a Neighbourhood Character Overlay (NCO) to twenty one (21) properties;

 

-        Ensures that new dwellings, extensions and outbuildings are appropriate to the neighbourhood character.

-        A statement on the neighbourhood character is included in the schedule to the overlay.

 

3.       Neighbourhood Residential Zone (NRZ) rezoning of 189 properties within the Study area.

 

-        Ensure protection of the low scale nature of dwellings.

-        The purpose of the zone is appropriate to the Jubilee Park Area and is consistent with the proposed HO and NCO controls.

 

The following table provides a breakdown on the key elements of the particular controls:

 

Proposed Control

Heritage Overlay

(HO)

Neighbourhood Character Overlay

(NCO)

Neighbourhood Residential Zone (NRZ)

 

Require permit for demolition

Yes

Yes

No

Require permit for vegetation removal

Yes*

 

Yes

No trigger set out by zone provisions

Require a permit for buildings and works

Yes

Yes for works in the front setback, includes front fences

No if works normal to a dwelling.

Permit is required to construct or extent one dwelling on a lot less than 300sqm.

Permit required for 2 dwellings.

 

Require a permit for external alterations

Yes

No

 

No

Require a permit for subdivision

Yes

No

Yes

External painting

 

Yes*

No

No

Front fence restrictions

Yes*

Yes

Yes, in some cases in schedule to the zone

Neighbourhood Character objectives

-

Included in schedule to NCO

 

Included in the schedule to the Zone

Design response statements

-

Included in decisions guidelines

Included in decision guidelines

Require permit for Vegetation removal

Yes

Yes

Yes

 

Strategic rationale for the proposed changes

 

The primary objective in proposing the changes to the planning provisions for properties in the study area is to protect and manage the unique character of the precinct whilst at the same addressing the broader policy considerations of urban consolidation, use of existing infrastructure and sustainable development.  The application of three different planning controls is the result of assessing the most appropriate planning tool and balancing the competing strategic objectives. The recommendations are the result of detailed community consultation throughout the assessment process as set out in VPP Practice Note “Using the Neighbourhood Character Provisions in Planning Schemes, July 2004”.

 

Application of a Heritage Overlay (HO):

 

The heritage overlay is the most appropriate tool to address the need to protect houses with heritage value and the capacity to control demolition of buildings.  A neighbourhood character overlay is not recommended for properties within a heritage overlay.  Planning Practice Note 1 Applying the Heritage Overlay indicates that an appropriate test for a potential heritage place to pass to apply the heritage overlay is that it is something to be managed.

 

The inclusion of the properties within the heritage overlay is justified by setting out the significance of the place.  The assessment further addresses the local heritage significance in accordance with the following recognised heritage criteria:

 

·                Criterion A: Importance to the course or pattern of our cultural or natural history (historical significance).

·                Criterion B: Possession of uncommon rare or endangered aspects of our cultural or natural history (rarity).

·                Criterion C: Potential to yield information that will contribute to an understanding of our cultural or natural history (research potential).

·                Criterion D: Importance in demonstrating the principal characteristics of a class of cultural or natural places or environments (representativeness).

·                Criterion E: Importance in exhibiting particular aesthetic characteristics (aesthetic significance).

·                Criterion F: Importance in demonstrating a high degree of creative or technical achievement at a particular period (technical significance).

·                Criterion G: Strong or special association with a particular community or cultural group for social, cultural or spiritual reasons. This includes the significance of a place to Indigenous peoples as part of their continuing and developing cultural traditions (social significance).

·                Criterion H: Special association with the life or works of a person, or group of persons, of importance in our history (associative significance).

 

A full assessment of places identified in the study area revealed that several properties meet the threshold of heritage local significance and warrant inclusion in the Heritage Overlay.

 

The Amendment proposes to introduce Heritage Overlay controls to 4 (four) individual properties:

·                House, 5 Caroline Street, Ringwood

·                House and front fence, 20 Caroline Street, Ringwood

·                House, 18 James Street, Ringwood

·                House, 22 James Street, Ringwood

 

It is also proposed to introduce of two new heritage precincts:

·                Haig Street Precinct:   2-34 and 3-31 Haig Street, Ringwood

·                Kendall Street Precinct:  20-32 and 21-35 Kendall Street, Ringwood

 

Further, the Amendment proposes to extend the existing Heritage Overlay HO98. The existing HO98 Ellison Avenue Precinct is proposed to apply to 4, 14,16,18 Ellison Street.

 

Extension to Ellison Street precinct

 

The Study recommends the extension to this precinct at 4-18 Ellison Street Ringwood.  These properties were found to be significant and compare favourably with properties currently included in the heritage overlay and to be similar in style, scale and form.  The properties were considered to have the same level of intactness with the existing heritage precinct and although alterations were evident, the original design is still distinguishable.

 

The Ellison Street precinct is of local, architectural and aesthetic significance for the following reasons:

·                Historic significance: Demonstrate the rapid residential development that occurred in Ringwood around train lines in the early interwar years.

·                Aesthetic significance: good representative example of a residential precinct from the interwar period. The dominant building style is Californian bungalows.

 

 

 

 

Haig Street Precinct

 

This precinct extends to 3-31 and 2-34 Haig Street.  The Haig Street precinct is “a good representative example of a residential precinct, from the interwar/early post World War 2 period. While demonstrating a consistent building type-the single storey, detached bungalow, the precinct is notable for demonstrating the range of styles applied to the bungalows in the interwar and early post World War 2 years.”

 

Kendall Street Precinct

 

The interwar suburban streetscape is intact within the precinct, with garden settings, nature strips and street planting of Melaleuca with a row of three mature Liquidambar on the west side, the later appear to date from the 1930s-1950s.

 

5 Caroline Street Ringwood

 

The house was built in 1925-26 and is of local architectural significance.  The house exhibits a number of characteristics typical of the Californian bungalow style.

 

20 Caroline Street

 

The house and front fence was built in 1939-40 and it exhibits characteristics typical of the “Modern” style in a domestic building from the interwar period.

 

18 James Street Ringwood

 

The house was built in 1927-28 and is together with the timber garage of local significance.  It exhibits several characteristics typical of the Californian bungalows style.

 

22 James Street Ringwood 

 

The house is of local architectural and aesthetic significance. The house integrates several characteristics associated with the Federation era “Queen Anne” style and the Californian Bungalow style of the interwar period.

 

A full assessment of the significance of heritage properties is contained in the Jubilee Park Heritage and Neighbourhood Character Study report.

 

 

Introduction of a Neighbourhood Character Overlay

 

Understanding neighbourhood character, Planning Practice Note 43, June 2015 states that Neighbourhood character is defined as the combination of the public and private realms.  It is the cumulative impact of these contributions that establishes neighbourhood character. Understanding how these relationships physically appear on the ground is usually the most important aspect in establishing the character of the area.

 

The Practice Note also sets out the following principles in applying neighbourhood character policy:

·                It is relevant to differentiate between heritage and neighbourhood character.  While all areas have a history, not all areas have heritage significance.

·                Whilst amenity is about pleasantness and good functioning of an area neighbourhood character is about the sense of place and community meaning.  Sometimes, amenity standards can have an effect on neighbourhood character, but as a general principle neighbourhood character and amenity should be treated separately.

 

The Maroondah Neighbourhood Character Study 2004 is a Policy Reference in Clause 22.02 of the Maroondah Planning Scheme (ie Residential Neighbourhood Character) as well as Clauses 54; 55 and 56 of the Victoria Planning Provisions. This Study identified the defining built form, landscape/natural and social elements that combined to form and contribute to the character of Maroondah. There is no single character and the Study concluded that there were 24 definable neighbourhood character areas across the municipality.

 

One of the key objectives of Clause 22.02 is the need to “identify neighbourhood character and design elements that are special to maintaining and enhancing the character of the residential areas of Maroondah.” As noted in the Maroondah Neighbourhood Character Study 2004: “Neighbourhood character is not about the imposition of design styles, rather it should be about recognising the distinctive characteristics of different urban forms and their relationship to topography and vegetation, getting this right is the best way of maintaining and enhancing the sense of place.”

 

A crucial factor in considering the existing Neighbourhood Character Study is the fact that its recommendations have been implemented through the local policy section of the Maroondah Planning Scheme and this only applies to development that triggers the need for a planning permit.  Consequently, to ensure that new single dwellings and existing dwellings are appropriate to neighbourhood character it is necessary to introduce planning provisions that give rise to a permit trigger.  The Neighbourhood Character Overlay is such a tool. It also enables the neighbourhood character statement and neighbourhood character objectives to be articulated in the schedule to the zone.

Planning Practice Note 28 Using the Neighbourhood Character provisions in Planning Schemes sets out the criteria in applying a Neighbourhood Character Overlay (NCO).  It notes that: “the NCO can be used when the following criteria can be met:

·                The proposed area exhibits specific characteristics that need to be protected or changed to achieve a preferred character

·                The area, relative to the rest of the municipality, requires a specific approach to neighbourhood character

·                The application of local policy, the standard provisions of Clause 54 and Clause 55 or the residential schedule will not satisfy the neighbourhood character objectives identified in the local planning policy framework (LPPF) for that particular area

·                A rigorous character study has been undertaken that accurately shows the physical aspects of character in the area that need to be translated into the provisions of the NCO

·                The proposal is supported by appropriate community consultation.

The Practice Note further sets out that a NCO should not be used as a “blanket” control across the municipality.  It “should be applied strategically to areas where the application of the residential development standards consistently fails to meet the objectives for neighbourhood character in a particular area.”

Another relevant consideration in the application of the NCO is that although it restricts demolition of dwellings, this control is not intended to be used to conserve existing buildings, but rather to ensure that demolition does not occur until the Responsible Authority is satisfied that new development meets the desired neighbourhood character objectives for the area.

The findings of Jubilee Park Heritage and Neighbourhood Character Study Report identifies the special features of the local neighbourhood character of Jubilee Park and recommends how to ensure that future development is more compatible with and strengthens those qualities. 

A further consideration in the application of an NCO is that there must be an assessment of how the NCO will impact on meeting the housing needs of the municipality identified in the Municipal Strategic Statement.  It is relevant to note that the proposed application of the NCO will affect 20 properties and as such the likely impact on the supply of housing on the municipality will be very minor.

The Study identified the key elements that define the neighbourhood character of Jubilee Park, specifically southern end of James and Kendall Street, and almost full extent of Ellison Street and Haig Street.  These are the built form and spacious garden settings when viewed from the public domain, in particular:

·                The existence of low scale, older style homes (including dwellings of heritage significance),

·                The predominance of timber as a building material,

·                Well established landscaping,

·                Consistent front and side boundaries setbacks, low front fences

 

The properties recommended to be included in the Neighbourhood Character Overlay include:

·                20 and 24-28A James Street, Ringwood

·                19-29 James Street, Ringwood

·                34 Kendall Street, Ringwood

·                3-17 Ellison Street, Ringwood

 

Rezoning of land from General Residential Zone to Neighbourhood Residential Zone

 

As noted above the subject land within the Jubilee Park study area is zoned General Residential Zone Schedule 1 (GRZ1). The recent changes to the residential zones under Amendment VC110 have resulted in planning provisions where the differences between the NRZ and GRZ are now minimal.

 

The purpose of the General Residential Zone is:

·                To implement the State Planning Policy Framework and the Local Planning Policy Framework, including the Municipal Strategic Statement and local planning policies.

·                To encourage development that respects the neighbourhood character of the area.

·                To encourage a diversity of housing types and housing growth particularly in locations offering good access to services and transport.

·                To allow educational, recreational, religious, community and a limited range of other non-residential uses to serve local community needs in appropriate locations.

 

The schedule to the GRZ may now contain neighbourhood character objectives to be achieved for the area.  The zone also contains a minimum garden area requirement regardless of whether a planning permit is required, which provides that a minimum 30% of the lot must be set aside as ground level garden for lots between 501 sqm and 650 sqm, and 35% on lots above 650sqm.

 

A mandatory maximum building height of 11 metres and 3 storeys is now included in the GRZ. This can be varied at a schedule to the zone.  Further the schedule to the GRZ does not require a planning permit for the construction or extension of one dwelling on a lot between 300 sqm and 500 sqm.

 

As the low scale nature of the dwellings in the study area is one of the most notable characteristics which require protection, the NRZ has already built in height provisions restricting the height of dwellings to 9m.

The Study included an assessment of the most appropriate zone for the area. It notes that the two key elements are the purpose of the zone and the mandatory building height.

Because one of the defining elements of the neighbourhood character for the area is the low scale nature of the older homes, the most appropriate building height is considered to be 9 metres as opposed to 11 metres. Whilst the General Residential Zone could be chosen, and the height varied through the schedule to the zone, it is considered that the application of the NRZ, which already has these provisions in place, is the most logical option.  The purpose of the Neighbourhood Residential Zone is considered more appropriate to the Jubilee Park area, as it recognises areas with predominantly single and double storey residential development, and is intended to manage and ensure that development respects the identified neighbourhood character, heritage, environmental or landscape characteristics of an area.

Due to the low scale nature of the built form in Caroline, Henry, Thomas and Emerald streets and Greenwood Avenue, the application of the NRZ was considered most appropriate and justifiable. The report notes that while the garden setting and architectural styles are less consistent, built form is uniformly single storey. There are also several individual HO properties within this precinct.

The Amendment proposes to rezone the following properties from General Residential Zone to Neighbourhood Residential Zone:

·        18-28A James Street, Ringwood

·        19-29 James Street, Ringwood

·        20-34 Kendall Street, Ringwood

·        21-35 Kendall Street, Ringwood

·        3-17 Ellison Street, Ringwood

·        4-18 Ellison Street, Ringwood

·        3-31 Haig Street, Ringwood

·        2-34 Haig Street, Ringwood

·        1-31 Caroline Street Ringwood

·        2-36 Caroline Street Ringwood

·        1-33 Henry Street Ringwood

·        2-34 Henry Street Ringwood

·        34, 38, 37A-57 Thomas Street Ringwood

·        1-9 Emerald Street Ringwood

·        62A Ford Street Ringwood

·        2-10 Emerald Street Ringwood

·        28-30B & 32A Greenwood Avenue Ringwood

 

Other provisions such as front and side setbacks, and the maximum height of the front fence can be managed in a schedule to the Residential zone.

 

 

Financial / economic issues

All costs incurred, including any panel hearing, will be covered through Council’s operational budget.

Environmental / amenity issues

The recognition of the unique character of the Jubilee Park area will encourage the retention of garden settings, established tree canopies and the reduction of hard surfaces within front gardens.

Social / community issues

This Amendment is the result of collaboration between residents and Council to manage and protect the neighbourhood character of the Jubilee Park area.

Community consultation

Community consultation was undertaken as part of the Scoping Study including a community values survey, distribution of brochures, and the establishment of a Steering Group comprising community representatives.

 

During the planning scheme amendment process, subject to receiving authorisation from Minister for Planning, the proposed Amendment would be placed on public exhibition for a period of one month. Any persons deemed to be affected by the Amendment will be given notice of the Amendment and the opportunity to make a submission.

 

Public exhibition of the Amendment would include:

·                Advertisement in the Maroondah Leader and Government Gazette;

·                Direct notification of affected and adjoining properties; and

·                Notices to statutory authorities and prescribed Ministers.

Conclusion

Amendment C116 to the Maroondah Planning Scheme will facilitate the further conservation of places with local heritage significance in the Jubilee Park area.  The proposed planning controls are the result of a detailed and rigorous independent assessment.

 

Within a context of increasing development pressures within the Jubilee Park area, the Amendment will lead to a stronger focus on retaining its unique heritage and neighbourhood character attributes.

 

Work to date has been heavily informed by engagement with the local community who have expressed strong support for the Amendment.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

1.

Jubilee Park Heritage & Neighbourhood Character - Final Report 160218 Revised

2.

Jubilee Park C116 Explanatory Report- Authorisation

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council

1.       notes the recommendations of the jubilee park heritage and neighbourhood study, final report FEBRUARY 2018 context pty ltd contained in attachment 1

2.       seeks authorisation from the minister for planning under section 8A of the planning and environment act 1987 to prepare and exhibit amendment c116 to the maroondah planning scheme generally in accordance with attachment 2

  


DOCUMENTS FOR SEALING

 

 

Letters Under Seal - Recognition of 2018 Australia Day Honours

ITEM 1

 

Background

Council Policy re: Honours / Recognition of Milestones & Achievements provides that recipients of Australian Honours who reside within the City of Maroondah, be also acknowledged on such recognition by Council and presented with a Letter Under Seal.

 

The Australian Honours comprise:

·        Order of Australia medal,

·        Australian Bravery decorations,

·        Military medals for Gallantry and for Distinguished and Conspicuous Service,

·        Commemorative medals,

·        Meritorious Service and Long Service medals and,

·        Public Service Medals

 

The Honours List is published twice a year, i.e. Australia Day (January) and Queen’s Birthday (June).

 

Council has been made aware of the following recognition given in the 2018 Australia Day Honours List as recently announced by the Governor General:

 

Ms Karen Maree Gooden, (Warranwood resident) – awarded a Public Service Medal (PSM) for her work on outstanding public service the improvement of outcomes for job seekers.

 

Mr Raymond William Purdey, (Croydon North resident) – awarded a Public Service Medal (PSM) for his work for outstanding public service to parliamentary institutions in Victoria.

 

Mrs Lavina June Petrie, (Kilsyth resident) – awarded an Order of Australia Medal (OAM) in the General Division for her service to athletics in Victoria.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

That council signs and seals LETTERs OF CONGRATULATIONS IN RECOGNITION OF THE 2018 AUSTRALIA DAY HONOURS AWARDED TO Ms karen maree gooden and mr raymond william purdey, recipients of the public service medal (pSM) and Mrs lavinIa june petrie, recipient of the order of australia medal (OAM) in the General Division