2014 Maroondah Logo RGB.jpg

 

 

Councillor

(as addressed)

 

 

The next Council Meeting will be held in the Council Chamber, Braeside Avenue, Ringwood, on Monday 18 December 2017, commencing at 7:30pm and your presence is requested.

 

 

Yours faithfully

SKozlows.jpg

 

Steve Kozlowski

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

Note:

This meeting is being streamed live on the internet and recorded.

Every care is taken to maintain privacy and attendees are advised they may be recorded.

 

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Council Chamber
is fitted with a Hearing Aid Induction Loop

 

Switch Hearing Aid to ‘T’ for Reception

 

City Offices

Braeside Avenue, Ringwood, 3134

Postal

PO Box 156, Ringwood 3134

DX 38068, Ringwood

Telephone

1300 88 22 33

 

 

Facsimile

Email

Web

 

Service Centres

Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS): 131 450

National Relay Service (NRS): 133 677

(03) 9298 4345

maroondah@maroondah.vic.gov.au

www.maroondah.vic.gov.au

 

Croydon: Civic Square

REALM: 179 Maroondah Hwy, Ringwood

 


 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Attendance Report

Item 1

 

ORDER OF BUSINESS

1.       Prayer

2.       Acknowledgment of Country

3.       Apologies  

4.       Declaration of Interests

5.       Confirmation of Minutes of the Ordinary Council Meeting held on Monday 27 November 2017.

6.       Public Questions

7.       Officers’ Reports

Director Corporate Services

1.       Attendance Report                                                                                                    4

2.       Reports of Assembly of Councillors                                                                         7

3.       Councillor Representation Reports                                                                        10

4.       Council Land at 56 Arlington Street, Ringwood                                                     12

5.       Local Government Women's Charter 21                                                                15

Director Operations, Infrastructure & Leisure

1.       2017 Maroondah Festival                                                                                       20

2.       Petition - Hull Road Croydon                                                                                  23

Director Planning & Community

1.       Active & Healthy Ageing Initiative - Year 2 (2016-2017) Age-friendly Journey Report                                                                                                                                28

2.       Bushfire Management Overlay                                                                               32

3.       Packaged Liquor Alchohol Density Project                                                            37

4.       Update on 2016 Census results                                                                             49

5.       Domestic Animal Management Plan                                                                      54  

8.       Documents for Sealing

1.       Letter Under Seal - Mr Frank Sullivan                                                                    58  

9.       Motions to Review   

10.     Late Item

11.     Requests / Leave of Absence

12.     In Camera

Chief Executive Officer

1.       Personnel Matter

Director Corporate Services

1.       Contract 20601 Receipt, Sorting and Marketing of Recyclables-Variation to Contract

Director Operations, Infrastructure and Leisure

1.       Tender Evaluation Report - Contract 20857 Heathmont Shopping Centre Access & Safety Improvement Works

2.       Tender Evaluation Report - Contract 20848 Cleaning Services for Depot, Public Toilets & Barbecues

3.       Tender Evaluation Report - Contract 1906-0625 Progressive Procurement of Electricity for Large Sites through Procurement Australia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purpose

To provide an opportunity for Councillors to report on Council activities undertaken since the last Ordinary Meeting of Council and forthcoming ward activities.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

Not Applicable

Issue / discussion

It is intended that the Mayor and Councillors be given the opportunity to present a verbal or written report updating Council on the activities they have undertaken in their role as Councillors and forthcoming ward activities.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

It is appropriate that Councillors formally report to Council upon the activities they have undertaken in their role as Councillors.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE REPORTS AS PRESENTED BY

COUNCILLORS

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Reports of Assembly of Councillors

Item 2

 

Purpose

To present the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings at the City Offices Ringwood, usually two weeks prior to the formal Council Meeting, and to note the issues discussed.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

An Assembly of Councillors, as defined under the Local Government Act 1989 [s.3], is a planned or scheduled meeting, comprising at least five (5) Councillors and one (1) member of Council staff, that considers matters that are intended or likely to be:

 

·        the subject of a decision of the Council; or

·        subject to the exercise of a delegated function, duty or power of Council

Examples of an Assembly of Councillors may include:

 

·        Councillor Briefings (which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings),

·        On-site inspections,

·        Consultative Meetings with residents, developers, consultants,

·        Panel Hearings conducted under s223 of the Act,

·        Meetings with local organisations, Government Departments, statutory authorities, and local politicians

Issue / discussion

As part of decision making processes at Maroondah, it is essential that Councillors are briefed on a range of issues which come before Council for consideration.  As a means of providing this information, Assembly of Councillors briefings are conducted.

 

Assemblies are also attended by Council Officers, and sometimes other specific advisors, to provide Councillors with a detailed knowledge and understanding of issues under consideration to a level of detail that would inhibit timely decision-making, that would not be possible in an open Council meeting, where decision-making related debate is governed by strict meeting procedures.

 

The intent of this report is to present the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings, and to note the items discussed.  This information is already available to the public upon request in accordance with the Local Government Act [s.80A].

 

This report and attachments formally table the information items previously covered by Councillors.

 

The ‘Public Record’ of the Assembly of Councillors briefings held on 27 November 2017 and 4 December 2017 is attached for information.

 

The items contained therein were noted.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

Assembly of Councillors briefings are important forums for advice and discussion, on what are often complex issues facing the municipality, in the lead up to formal decisions being made by Councillors at Council Meetings.  At Assemblies, or outside them, Councillors also have the opportunity of requesting additional information to assist in the decision making process.

 

It is appropriate that the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings at the City Offices Ringwood, usually two weeks prior to the formal Council Meeting, be noted at a formal meeting of Council.


 

 

Attachments

1.

2017 November 27 - Assembly of Councillors Public Record

2.

2017 December 04 - Assembly of Councillors Public Record

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE PUBLIC RECORD OF THE ASSEMBLY OF COUNCILLORS BRIEFINGS HELD ON 27 November 2017 and 4 December 2017

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Councillor Representation Reports

Item 3

 

Purpose

To receive and note the following meeting minutes.

·        Maroondah Partners In Community Wellbeing Committee (MPIC) held on 13 November 2017

·        Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee (MDAC) held on 16 November 2017

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable.

Background

As part of Council's commitment to the principles and practice of good governance, it is appropriate that Councillors and the Community are formally updated on the actions and activities of the various organisations bodies/advisory groups upon which it is represented.

Issue / discussion

Council is represented on numerous Boards and Organisations. Appointments are made annually by Council at the commencement of the new Mayoral term.

 

Crs Marks and Graham are Council’s representative on the Maroondah Partners In Community Wellbeing Committee.

 

Crs Lamont and Spears are Council’s representatives on the Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

 

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

 

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

It is appropriate that Councillors and the Community are formally updated on the actions and activities of the various organisations bodies/advisory groups upon which Council is represented.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Maroondah Partners In Community Wellbeing Committee (MPIC) Minutes - 13 November 2017

2.

Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee (MDAC) Minutes - 16 November 2017

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES MINUTES OF THE

1.       Maroondah partners in community wellbeing COMMITTEE HELD ON 13 november 2017

2.       Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee held on 16 november 2017

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Council Land at 56 Arlington Street, Ringwood

Item 4

 

Purpose

To commence the statutory processes prerequisite to the possible disposal of Council’s land at 56 Arlington Street, Ringwood.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community.

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effective empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered. Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes, and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs.

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

8..1    Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable.

8.2     Ensure responsible and sustainable management of Maroondah resources, assets, infrastructure and natural environment.

Background

Council purchased this property in April 2009 for $430,000.

 

Prior to Eastlink being completed, and based on future traffic projections mainly due to motorists not being able to turn right off Eastlink at Maroondah Highway when coming from the south, it was predicted that traffic movement improvements would be required at Molan Street and New Street in the form of a roundabout.

 

It was believed that a roundabout would better cater for post Eastlink higher traffic demands from the Canterbury Road/Eastlink interchange, accessing the Ringwood Central Activity District. However, based on how traffic patterns have evolved post Eastlink and with a VicRoads project currently underway to install the Ringwood to Box Hill shared path (with associated infrastructure including planned signalisation of New Street and Albert Street), with the shared path crossing New Street just south of the rail bridge, there is no longer the need for a roundabout.

 

The present traffic and likely future volumes do not cause issues at New Street and Molan Street, and if a roundabout was installed, it would not work effectively in tandem with the new signals proposed at Albert Street. In addition, the lack of right turn from Eastlink to Maroondah Highway from the south will most probably be addressed as part of the construction for North East Link.

 


 

Issue / discussion

The property is 1003 square metres in size and is zoned General Residential Zone.

 

The land is undeveloped.  Mowing scheduled for 12 times per year is the only work Council undertakes.  There are no plans to improve the land.  The land has previously been identified as a site that could be disposed of with the sale proceeds to form part of Council’s Capital Reserve Fund.

Financial / economic issues

The costs associated in preparing the property for disposal will be met within current budget allocations.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not applicable

Social / community issues

Not applicable

Community consultation

Consultation must be conducted in accordance with the Section 223 of the Local Government Act 1989 on any proposal to sell Council land. The Local Government Act provides that a person may, within 28 days of the date of the public notice, lodge a written submission regarding the proposed sale of the subject land.

 

Where a person has made a written submission to Council requesting that he or she be heard in support of the written submission, Council must permit that person to be heard before a meeting of Council or the Committee which has delegated authority to hear those submissions, giving reasonable notice of the day, time and place of meeting.

 

After hearing any submissions made, Council must determine whether to proceed with the proposed sale or abandon it.

 

Conclusion

That Council should resolve to sell the land at 56 Arlington Street, Ringwood at current market value plus GST as it is surplus to its needs.

 

 

Attachments

1.

56 Arlington Site Plan

2.

56 Arlington Aerial Plan

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That with respect to council owned land at 56 arlington street, ringwood, council resolves:

1.       to give public notice pursuant to section 189 local government act, 1989 of its intention to sell the land by public tender, public auction or private treaty at or above current market value

2.       in accordance with section 223 of the act:

i.        a committee comprising councillors ________, ______ and ________ be appointed to hear any persons wishing to be heard in support of their submission, on a date to be determined;

ii.       considers all written submissions, including a written report on the proceedings of any committee hearing conducted, following which it shall determine whether or not to sell the land as proposed; and

iii.      the director corporate services be authorized to undertake the administrative procedures necessary to enable council to carry out its functions under section 223 of the act in relation to this matter.

3.       that should no submissions be received, council further resolves that having followed all the required statutory procedures pursuant to section 189, 207a and 223 of the act, land comprising of lot 1 TP 531631 be sold at or above market  value;

4.       the chief executive officer, or any other person with the necessary delegation, sign any transfer of land and other documents required to be signed in connection with the sale of the said land to the owners.

5.       that the proceeds of any sale of the said land be retained as a restricted asset within council’s capital reserve fund.

 

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Local Government Women's Charter 21

Item 5

 

Purpose

To provide an update on Maroondah City Council’s participation in the Victorian Local Government Australia (VLGA) Women’s Charter; update Council’s nominated charter champions; and to acknowledge a twelve month project “WomensCharter21” funded by the DHHS Community Primary Prevention Partnerships to the VLGA.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that consider the needs and aspirations of all ages and population groups. Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparency, while working with the community to advocate for and ‘champion’ local needs

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

The organisation has a significant amount of activity relating to increasing female participation across all its operations.

1.6     Actively promote health and wellbeing principles and initiatives within the community

2.15 Facilitate and encourage the provision of world class life-long learning opportunities in   Maroondah, from early learning through to adult and tertiary levels

2.20 Encourage life-long learning opportunities that support mature age and retired people    to participate in the workforce, learn new skills and build community connections

2.23 Facilitate connections between education providers, businesses and the broader community to support employment pathways, intergenerational connections and knowledge transfer

7.1     Ensure accessibility and social inclusion principles are considered in the planning,         delivery and evaluation of facilities and services

7.4     Support community members to age in place, live in accessible neighbourhoods and     remain socially connected

7.8     Supports all ages and population groups to be valued, connected and empowered         within their local community through the provision and coordination of accessible          services, programming and facilities

7.9     Promote the value, expertise and contribution of mature aged workers and encourage           intergenerational mentoring and skill transfer

7.10 Promote and create opportunities for community connectedness, learning, mentoring     and social interactions for people from all life-stages and cultural background

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and          accountable

8.3     Provide community inspired leadership in democratic governance

8.8     Undertake inclusive engagement and consultation using accessible and tailored   approaches to consider the needs and aspirations of different age and population      groups

Priority Action 2017-2018:

·        Develop a gender equity policy

·        Prepare and commence implementation of a new Health and Wellbeing Plan 2017

·        Develop a female participation strategy for physical activity

·        Investigate and implement additional female changing facilities at local sporting venues

Background

The Local Government Women’s Charter recognises the need for increased women’s participation in Local Government by support of three key principles:

·        gender equity: advocating the equal right of women and men to be local government representatives;

·        diversity of representation: encouraging the inclusion of different experiences and perspectives in local government and community decision making;

·        recognising and supporting the active citizenship of women: increasing the numbers and participation of women in decision making so that our community demographics are more accurately reflected in local government.

 

Council at its meeting in August 2010 endorsed the Victorian Local Government Women’s Charter and nominated both Councillor Lamont and Thomas as Charter Champions along with the Director Corporate Services. Council undertook a range of activities during 2012 in the lead up to the Council elections to attract greater interest in civic affairs and increase participation in the number of female candidates for the 2012 elections.

Issue / discussion

The Local Government Women’s Charter is in its 21st year of existence and is adopted by 69 out of 79 Victorian Councils. VLGA has received funding from the DHHS Community Primary Prevention Partnerships program to work with Councils to reactive the Charter in their local government area, with a 12 month project entitled “WomensCharter21”.

 

 

 

 

 

Issue 1

 

Councillor Lamont is the remaining Councillor who is an endorsed Women’s Charter Champion. Council seeks to nominate other interested Councillors to be Women’s Charter Champions. At Council’s recent Statutory Meeting, Councillors Graham and Spears have also become Women’s Charter Champions

 

Issue 2

 

The VLGA has provided a guide to reactivating and implementing the Charter, which is attached. Council is reviewing the guide to ensure it continues the work of increasing participation by women in local democracy.

 

Issue 3

 

Since endorsing the VLGA Women’s Charter in August 2010, Council has undertaken a range of programs and projects to support the three key principles: gender equity; diversity; and active citizenship. A list of these activities is provided below:

·        Gender Equity

-        Gender equity policy 2017/2018 to be developed/led by Community Planning and development will look to clarify Councils role, responsibilities, and approach to a range of gender equity issues.

-        Council is one of 30+ partners participating in Together for Equality and Respect, the regional plan for preventing violence against women project. This includes regular attendance at Community of Practice forums; looking at practice in sporting clubs, gender equity in culturally and linguistically diverse communities and women in leadership.

-        For the past 3 years Council has participated in ‘16 Days of Activism Against Gender Based Violence’. In 2017 the campaign will be Gender Equality for Us #GE4Us.

-        Partnering with Women’s Health East and the Maroondah Preschool Teacher’s Network to develop and deliver gender equity training to early childhood educators in August in preschool settings.

-        Working with Eastern Regional Libraries to develop a booklist with a range of stories that promote gender equity.

-        A number of community grants support Councils work in the gender equity/ preventing violence against women space including

o   Ringwood Uniting Preschool: promoting gender equity activities in kinder settings.

o   Swinburne University Student Union: establishing a Queer Collective at Croydon campus.

o   Project Respect: outreach to licenced brothels and capacity building training to services in Maroondah.

o   SALT Sport and Life Training: to deliver programs to sporting clubs including units on family violence and respectful relationships.

-        The Locker Room project featured at the Maroondah Festival 2014. The project takes place in a 12 metre long shipping container and is a mixed media installation and performance that addresses the issues of violence against women.

-        The One Million Stars to end Violence Project successful saw 30,000 stars woven and 5,000 community members and 50 community groups engaged to draw attention to ending all forms of violence including against women and children.

-        The event ‘It’s time we talked about porn’ was delivered to highlight how stereotypes and increasing violence against women is portrayed in a range of social media settings and how these stereotypes/behaviours contribute to violence against women and how young women may perceive gender roles.

·        Diversity of Representation

-        Council holds a gender balance at the Councillor level. The 2016 Maroondah election saw 13 women run for Council, resulting in 4 women elected to a 9 seat Council.

·        Recognising and Supporting the Active Citizenship of Women

-        Redevelopment of sporting clubs including female friendly changing rooms.

-        ‘Our Codes, Our Clubs’ a collaborative project with the purpose of identifying the practical actions sporting clubs can take to promote and normalise gender equality within their clubs.

-        ‘Women on the Go’ events focusing on women, their business and their health and wellbeing, providing an opportunity for women to come together to network and promote their business, whilst learning about the business journeys of local innovative women.

-        Development of a female participation strategy for physical activity informed by community consultation around the current issues, barriers and opportunities to female participation in sport.

-        Prioritising female friendly infrastructure improvements by investigating and implementing additional female changing facilities at local sporting venues.

Financial / economic issues

Advocacy and Council programs identified in this repeat are contained within the current budget.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

This report recognises the positive work undertaken across the municipality by Council and its many partners in ensuring women in Maroondah are able to develop to their full potential and participate equally across all aspects of family, community and business life.

 

Community consultation

Maroondah 2040 Health and Wellbeing Plan provided extensive community consultation surrounding female friendly opportunities and was recently adopted by Council.

 

Conclusion

The WomensCharter21 provides an opportunity for Council to encourage greater participation of women to enhance diversity and representation for Local Government and the community.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Safe and Strong - A Victorian Gender Equality Strategy

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council notes the

1.       guide to reactivating and implementing the charter, and will continue to identify ways to increase participation by women in local democracy

 

2.       update of actions in support of the three women’s charter key principles of gender equity, diversity and active citizenship

  


DIRECTOR Operations, Infrastructure & Leisure Adam Todorov

 

2017 Maroondah Festival

Item 1

 

Purpose

To provide an overview of the 2017 Maroondah Festival.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A vibrant and culturally rich community

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah is a creative cosmopolitan community recognised for its celebration and promotion of arts and culture. There are a broad range of engaging entertainment options, diverse cultural activities and the creation and display of contemporary and traditional forms of art.

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

3.2       Provide a diverse range of engaging entertainment spaces, events and activities

3.3       Support festivals and events that celebrate local arts, diversity and produce 

Background

The Maroondah Festival originated in 1990 as the Croydon Festival. Primarily a music festival, it was designed to encourage the involvement of Council, community groups, local traders and key business stakeholders within the local area and the surrounding Eastern Region.

 

In 2009 a comprehensive review was carried out of the Festival and the decision was made to make the Festival a bright and colourful, interactive event with a stronger community focus. Taking advantage of the natural shade in Town Park it was suggested that the event meander among the trees and have a relaxed feel for all of the family to enjoy.

Issue / Discussion

Attendance for the 2017 Maroondah Festival was estimated by the Victorian Police at over 25,000. There was over 200 stalls on site, with 85 of those assigned to Community groups, a further 55 sites were assigned to food stalls. This is an increase of 40 more sites than 2016.

In addition to the stalls there was over 60 local community groups that participated in stage programming, workshops and demonstration spaces.

Council’s presence also continues to grow with 18 departments conducting displays or interactive activities, including Sport & Recreation, Depot Operations, Local Laws, Communications & Marketing, Children’s Services, Occasional Care, Community Health, Aged and Disability, Community Development & Sustainability, REALM, BizHub, Karralyka, Youth Services, Arts & Culture, Maroondah Leisure, Waste Management and Maternal & Child Health.

We also had 28 local businesses participate in display sites.

FINANCIAL / Economic issues

Whilst the budget for the Maroondah Festival has not increased, the cost of infrastructure, programming and staffing continues to grow. Sport & Recreation in conjunction with Fruitbowl Productions who are contracted to manage the event has worked hard to increase sponsorship to offset these costs with a record $54,000 sourced in sponsorship and an estimated $15,000 more with in-kind support.

Environmental / amenity issues

Council engaged waste management company ‘Closed Loop’ to ensure the event site was clean and tidy both during and after the event with regular cleaning of the public toilet facilities. Council worked with the Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee to provide greater accessibility throughout the Festival site including the use of Marveloo, compliant access points, accessible Park & Ride bus service, the relocation of Café Consult and a low sensory environment room to support participants who are on the autism spectrum.

Social / community issues

Some of the community feedback received is highlighted below:

 

“Maroondah City Council your work on the Maroondah Festival each year is absolutely FANTASTIC. My wife and I bought in Croydon ten Years ago, and we have really enjoyed the Festival and enjoy it even more now that we have young children to share it with. The Festival is a bright spot on the annual calendar for residents, I think it’s terrific that Council supports it so much!”
Daniel Verberne – Resident (Facebook)

“Nice weather, nice crowd, good arrangement of the event, can’t ask for more” Online respondent – Resident

 “Congratulations this was the first time I have attended and my partner and I were extremely impressed by the overall organisation, variety of entertainment, displays and interactive participation. We will definitely be back next year and will be telling all our family and friends. This was by far the best community based event we have ever attended. Thank you” Online respondent – Resident

“Thanks for keeping it free entry and free kids activities and rides” Courtney Beard – Resident (Facebook)

“Overall excellent and larger than expected” Survey respondent – Resident

I would rate it as one of the best Festivals, had a Great Day!” Jo-anne Taylor Resident (Facebook)

Community consultation

Council engaged Event Data Research Company ITESA to survey festival participants on the event day. A total of 334 face to face surveys were conducted at various locations on the day.  

 

The main reason for attending the event (46.9%) was to enjoy the activities.

 

88% of the respondents were returning participants and only 0.9% of the respondents were unlikely to return to the event in 2018.

 

The top 3 activities on the day were the Kids Kingdom, free & purchased amusements and the variety of food stalls. 

 

62% of the attendees live within Maroondah City Council area, with the majority (37%) of the respondents from Croydon (3136).

 

We asked the respondents how they would rate their level of enjoyment and 99% of the respondents rated their level of enjoyment as enjoyable (12%), very enjoyable (52%) to extremely enjoyable (35%)

 

The number one recommendation or suggestion from the respondents was the provision of more shade areas and seating. Given the temperature on the day was 27 degrees this response was anticipated and will be reviewed for future events.

Conclusion

The Maroondah Festival continues to grow in popularity and is widely regarded as one of the biggest community festivals in Victoria.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That Council Receives and notes the report on the 2017 marOondah festival

 


DIRECTOR Operations, Infrastructure & Leisure Adam Todorov

 

Petition - Hull Road Croydon

Item 2

 

Purpose

The purpose of this report is for Council to receive a petition containing 230 signatures in response to Council’s road safety proposal to implement cycle lanes on Hull Road.  The petition raises concerns regarding the road being formally shared between cyclists and heavy vehicles, and requests that restrictions be placed on heavy vehicles using Hull Road from Dorset Road to the 5-ways roundabout.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  An accessible and connected community.

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah is an accessible community for all ages and abilities with walkable neighbourhoods, effective on and off-road transport networks, and access to a range of sustainable transport options.

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

5.5     Improve the efficiency of Maroondah’s road network through effective asset management, maintenance and renewal works

Background

Council received a petition on 4 December 2017.  The petition dated 27 November 2017, with an accompanying letter dated 4 December 2017, contained 230 signatures from residents within Hull Road and local side streets.

 

The prayer of the petition is as follows:

 

“While we think the Bike Lanes are an excellent idea as residents we are Not Comfortable with the combination of heavy vehicles and cyclists.

 

We ask that restrictions be placed on heavy vehicles from Dorset Road to the 5-ways roundabout on Hull Road and this traffic to be diverted to more suitable roads ie Canterbury or Maroondah Highway

 

We believe we would then be not only Improving Road Safety along Hull Road, but also be addressing the significant environment issues of the Diesel Fumes and Noise Pollution thereby Encouraging Cyclists to Use the Proposed Bike Lanes.”

Issue / discussion

Hull Road between Dorset Road and the 5-Ways roundabout is a 1.8km length of higher order arterial road under the management of VicRoads. Hull Road connects the Croydon Major Activity Centre (MAC) via Hewish Road with Mooroolbark, carries approximately 20,000 vehicles per day, and forms part of the 689 Croydon to Montrose Bus Route.

 

mapryh3lx45idbvhzfjy2hzfw45-633777267538827751

 

Figure 1.  Hull Road Locality Plan

 

Strategically, VicRoads has designated the road as part of the Principal Bike Network (PBN). The PBN is a network of proposed and existing cycle routes that help people cycle for transport, and provide access to major destinations in Victoria.

 

 

Figure 2.  VicRoads Principle Bicycle Network Plan

 

Hull Road has an unusual width of 11.20 metres. The road characteristics include several bends and undulations, and it is marked with a centre line (including a ‘double-line’ section between Kincumber Drive and Kurrajong Avenue).  When considered in the context of the current road design standards, the existing road width does not safely allow for the formal marking of 2-lanes in each direction, or for the designation of a single lane and a parking lane in each direction.

 

Given the existing width of each lane of travel, motorists generally tend to drive single file, but in a staggered arrangement.  In the past five years, there has been 12 accidents along this section of Hull Road, seven (7) of these rear-end crashes, which is a high number of crashes for a road of this type.  It is possible that the road width and staggered driving arrangement is a contributing factor to these accidents.

 

Numerous traffic surveys undertaken during day and night periods indicate that Hull Road residents generally do not park along the road, with parking either banned, or not occurring possibly due to safety concerns relating back to the road width.  The demand for parking along Hull Road seems to be catered for within private property, or along the numerous side streets that intersect with Hull Road.

 

Council’s Engineers have worked in partnership with VicRoads to develop a proposal to improve road safety on Hull Road through the introduction of on-road bicycle lanes between Dorset Road and the 5-Ways roundabout, which addresses the width related issues and provides a safe on-road bicycle connection.

 

 

On 13 November 2017, Council commenced community consultation with residents residing in Hull Road, between Dorset Road and the 5-Ways Roundabout, seeking comments on the proposed bicycle lane proposal to improve road safety.

 

The consultation period ended on 1 December 2017, and during the survey period approximately 50 pieces of feedback were submitted.  It is anticipated that further comments will be received during the December month from late submitters.

 

In relation to the survey feedback received, it is intended that Council’s Engineers will engage an independent suitably qualified traffic engineering consultant to review and summarise the issues raised by the residents (including within the petition), and respond to each point in the context of the proposal, and make recommendations to support, amend or abandon the proposal.

 

A report detailing the outcomes of the consultation, including the petition, will be presented to Council at a future meeting with a recommendation on the next step for the project.

 

It should be noted that Hull Road is an Arterial Road under the care and management of VicRoads and accordingly the introduction of any ‘restriction’ on heavy vehicle traffic utilising Hull Road would ultimately require approval from VicRoads.  It is intended that the traffic engineering consultant referenced above will engage direct with VicRoads on this matter, and VicRoads position will be included within the final consultation report to Council.

Financial / economic issues

Subject to the consideration by Council of a future report on the consultation undertaken with Hull Road residents and the next step, the installation of on-road bike lanes in Hull Road is proposed to be funded through Council’s Local Area Traffic Management Program in the current 2017/18 financial year. 

 

An amount of $70,000 from the Capital Works Local Area Traffic Management Program budget has been allocated for the project.

Environmental / amenity issues

The on-road bike lanes would potentially encourage more people to cycle, thus reducing car usage, and associated pollution.  The project has been identified as a road safety initiative, which will improve amenity for cyclists and abutting residents.

Social / community issues

The provision of a bicycle lane on Hull Road will enhance transport connection between the Croydon Activity Centre and Mooroolbark.

Community consultation

As detailed in the report, residents have been given an opportunity to provide feedback on the proposal.  The feedback will be summarised and considered by a suitably qualified independent traffic engineering consultant, with recommendations, and these will be presented to Council and then the residents, prior to any changes to Hull Road.

Conclusion

It is recommended that Council receives and notes the petition containing 230 signatures, relating to the Hull Road on-road bicycle lane proposal, and requesting restrictions be placed on heavy vehicles using Hull Road from Dorset Road to the 5-ways roundabout.  It is proposed that a detailed investigation into the prayer of the petition be completed, along with all other feedback received by Council in relation to the proposed project, and a further report detailing the findings will be presented to Council at a future meeting.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That

1.       COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE PETITION containing 230 signatures, RELATING TO the Hull Road on-road bicycle lane PROPOSAL, requesting THAT restrictions be placed on heavy vehicles using Hull Road from Dorset Road to the 5-ways roundabout

2.       OFFICERS PREPARE A REPORT ON THE MATTERS RAISED IN THE PETITION, AND IN RESPONSE TO THE GENERAL FEEDBACK RECEIVED IN RELATION TO THE PROPOSED HULL ROAD BIKE LANE PROJECT, FOR CONSIDERATION AT A FUTURE MEETING OF COUNCIL

3.       THE LEAD PETITIONER IS ADVISED ACCORDINGLY

  


DIRECTOR Planning & Community Phil Turner

 

Active & Healthy Ageing Initiative - Year 2 (2016-2017) Age-friendly Journey Report

Item 1

 

Purpose

The purpose of this report is to present the Active & Healthy Ageing Initiative – Towards an Age-friendly Maroondah 2015-2020 Year 2 (2016 - 2017) Age-friendly Journey Report for Council to note and endorse.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2013-2017 (Year 4: 2016-2017) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  An inclusive and diverse community

Our Vision:  In the year 2040, Maroondah is an inclusive community where social connections are strong across generations and diversity is embraced and celebrated.

Key Directions 2013 – 2017:

7.8     Support all ages and population groups to be valued, connected, supported, and empowered within their local community through the provision and coordination of accessible services, programming, and facilities.

Background

An age-friendly city is defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as an inclusive and accessible urban environment that promotes active ageing.  The age-friendly initiative was created to make it easier for older people to age actively, to live in security, enjoy good health and continue to fully participate in society.  According to the WHO Global Age-friendly Cities framework there are 8 domains that influence the health and quality of older people in the community.  These are:

·        Community Support and Health Services

·        Transportation

·        Communication and Information

·        Housing

·        Social Participation

·        Respect and Social Inclusion

·        Outdoor Spaces and Buildings

·        Civic Participation and Employment

Local governments that plan and take action to accommodate the changing needs of older residents can ensure that their communities remain attractive places to live with features that not only benefit an ageing population but support the health, safety and participation of all residents of all ages.

 

A core aspect of age-friendly work is that it must include older people as active participants in the process.

 

On 1 December 2014, Maroondah was accepted as a member of the WHO Global Network of Age-friendly Cities and Communities (GNAFCC) in recognition of Council’s commitment to becoming age-friendly.  In June 2016, the WHO recognised Maroondah’s age-friendly progress and renewed our membership to the global network.

Issue / discussion

The Active & Healthy Ageing Initiative has been developed as the tool to guide Maroondah’s journey to becoming and remaining an age-friendly city.  The initiative explores the 8 age-friendly domains listed above and through extensive consultation with the community identified the priority areas for Maroondah with a particular focus on Maroondah’s population aged 45+ years.  As part of Council’s commitment in adopting the Active & Healthy Ageing Initiative and continually engaging with the community, an annual progress report is provided to inform them of Maroondah’s age-friendly journey.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

By 2030, over one quarter of Australia’s population will be aged over 60.  By 2020, over 40% of Maroondah’s population will be aged over 45 years.  Maroondah’s current population aged over 60 is higher than the metropolitan average and has the highest proportion of people aged over 85 in the Eastern Region.  The proportion of older people living alone and at risk of social isolation is increasing significantly.

 

Extensive community consultation with older people in Maroondah during the 2013 and 2014 Seniors Expo events, Maroondah Festival Café Consult 2013 and 2014, the 2040 forums and the extensive 4 months Active & Healthy Ageing Initiative customised consultation process have all indicated that our ageing population wish to continue to reside in the Maroondah community, remaining as independent as possible and living within their own homes.  Our ageing population wants to age healthily, continue to learn and remain connected to family and friends.  They wish to be treated with respect and contribute to community life as they age.

 

Older people in Maroondah have identified that they are seeking opportunities to remain physically active and socially connected, to have a choice of accessible, local services and businesses and to be able to access relevant and timely information.  Decreased mobility and confidence as people age requires that consideration is given to the accessibility, safety and security of Outdoor Spaces and Buildings.

Community consultation

As part of Council’s unique approach to the community consultation and engagement process, community leaders, older residents, Council employees and the Councillors were nominated to become part of Maroondah’s pioneering Age-friendly Champions program.  Discussions with the age cohort in the Maroondah community, led by the Champions team, have also informed Council’s Active & Healthy Ageing Initiative.

 

In line with the Age-friendly Cities requirements, the age cohort 45+ have contributed to the development of the Active & Healthy Ageing Initiative.  The initiative was also endorsed by the Council on the Ageing (COTA) Victoria, the peak advocacy body for seniors and approved by the World Health Organisation with regards to adopting a framework which appropriately meets the age-friendly cities criteria and reflects true collaboration with, and involvement by the ageing population in determining Maroondah’s priority areas.

 

In implementing the age-friendly initiatives as outlined in Council’s Active & Healthy Ageing Initiative, relevant stakeholder engagement and participation has been incorporated and ongoing community feedback and evaluation has also been sought where applicable.

Conclusion

There is a growing recognition and commitment from Federal, State and Local Governments and Community Service organisations to proactively plan for and prioritise actions with will meet the growing and evolving needs of Australia’s ageing population.  Maroondah’s Active & Healthy Ageing Initiative drives age-friendly concepts and actions to enable our ageing population to continue to contribute significantly to their communities, their families, the economy and society.

 

Active & Healthy Ageing Initiative – Towards an Age-friendly Maroondah 2015-2020 Year 2 (2016 - 2017) Age-friendly Journey Report is presented to Council to note and endorse.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Age Friendly Journey Report Year 2:  2016-2017

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

that COUNCIL

 

1.       ENDORSES THE ACTIVE & HEALTHY AGEING INITIATIVE – TOWARDS AN AGE-FRIENDLY MAROONDAH 2015-2020 YEAR 2 (2016-2017) AGE-FRIENDLY JOURNEY REPORT; and

2.       NOMINATEs CR LAMONT (MULLUM WARD), cR ……………….. (ARRABRI WARD) AND cR …………………….. (WYREENA WARD) TO BECOME AGE FRIENDLY CHAMPIONS FOR THEIR RESPECTIVE WARDS

 


DIRECTOR Planning & Community Phil Turner

 

Bushfire Management Overlay

Item 2

 

Purpose

The purpose of this report is to inform Council of the introduction of Clause 44.06 Bushfire Management Overlay (BMO) into the Maroondah Planning Scheme by the Minister for Planning.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A safe, healthy and active community.

Our Vision: 

In the year 2040, Maroondah will be a safe, healthy and active community with local opportunities provided for people of all ages and abilities to have high levels of social, emotional and physical wellbeing.

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

1.2       Plan and advocate for the application of community safety principles that facilitate a safe built environment.

Background

The BMO has been introduced by the Minister for Planning in response to a recommendation of the 2009 Victorian Bushfires Royal Commission and now applies to locations within the municipality that meets set criteria that identifies properties that have the potential to be affected by extreme bushfire. The BMO covers a total of 2,071 properties within Maroondah (mapping attached as Attachment 1). These properties are now subject to a mandatory set of controls restricting subdivision, buildings, and works.

 

The Key objectives of the BMO are as follows:

·        To implement the State Planning Policy Framework and the Local Planning Policy Framework, including the Municipal Strategic Statement and local planning policies.

·        To ensure that the development of land prioritises the protection of human life and strengthens community resilience to bushfire.

·        To identify areas where the bushfire hazard warrants bushfire protection measures to be implemented.

·        To ensure development is only permitted where the risk to life and property from bushfire can be reduced to an acceptable level.

 

The Victorian Government is acting to make homes, communities and the environment safer from bushfires. The Department of Environment, Land, Water, and Planning (DELWP) has reviewed and updated bushfire hazard mapping in planning schemes across Victoria. The update was a key recommendation of the 2009 Victorian Bushfires Royal Commission and ensures that consistent bushfire mapping and planning policies apply across the State.

 

The changes have been made in response to criteria developed by the Victorian Government, the CFA, and CSIRO. The BMO now applies to land that meet the following criteria:

·        Vegetation type and size – Forest, woodland, scrub, shrubland, mallee, and rainforest vegetation that is 4 hectares or more in size.

·        Ember buffer – A 150 metre buffer applied from the edge of vegetation identified in Criteria 1.

·        Extreme risk inclusions – Areas that fire authorities have advised may be subject to extreme landscape bushfires.

Issue / discussion

Properties included in the BMO now require a permit to subdivide land unless a schedule to this overlay specifically states that a permit is not required. A permit is also required to construct a new development or carry out works associated with accommodation, child care centres, education centres, hospitals, industry, leisure and recreation, offices, places of assembly, retail premises, service stations, timber production, and warehouses. This does not apply if specifically stated in a schedule, or if buildings and works are consistent with an agreement under section 172 of the Act. Councils can prepare schedules to the BMO, which must contain ‘a statement of the bushfire management objectives to be achieved for the area affected by the schedule and when the requirements within it apply’.

 

Existing planning permits will continue to operate until expiry.  Exemptions from requiring a planning permit include:

·        Extensions to existing homes less than 50% of the existing floor area;

·        Construction of certain outbuildings such as a shed or garage if less than 100m2;

·        Building or works with a floor area of less than 100m2 not used for accommodation and ancillary to a dwelling (e.g. sheds or outbuildings);

·        Building or works associated with Timber production provided the buildings or works are not within 150 metres of Accommodation or land zoned for residential or rural residential purposes; and

·        If a schedule specifically states that certain subdivision, buildings, or works does not require a permit.

 

The BMO also introduces new vegetation regulations under the 10/50 rule. The 10/50 rule enables land owners to manage and clear vegetation that poses a bushfire hazard without a planning permit. The rule allows clearing of:

 

·        Any vegetation within 10 metres of an existing dwelling built before the 10th of September 2009.

·        Vegetation (excluding trees) within 50 metres of an existing dwelling built before the 10th of September 2009.

·        Vegetation within a combined maximum width of 4 metres on either side of an existing boundary fence built before the 10th of September 2009.

 

The 10/50 rule only applies to properties within the BMO. Clearing of vegetation in all other circumstances will need to be considered through the normal planning permit process.

 

Future developments within the BMO will also be required to abide by the following bushfire protection measures:

·        Be built to current bushfire construction standards;

·        Locate buildings away from bushfire hazards;

·        Manage vegetation and fuel loads;

·        Install a water tank and provide fire truck access; and

·        Refer planning permit applications to fire authorities, if required.

 

Vulnerable uses and developments (e.g. schools, childcare facilities, proposals in areas with significant landscape risk) may require additional measures.

 

The requirements of Clause 44.06 Bushfire Management Overlay do not apply to a single dwelling or a dependent person's unit, when a permit under the Building Act 1993 was issued before the commencement of Amendment GC13, if:

·        Vegetation is managed to accord with the bushfire attack level assessment undertaken at the time the building permit was issued;

·        Static water supply is provided to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

-        2500 litres on lots of 500 square metres or less

-        5000 litres on lots of more than 500 square metres.

·        No permit was required for such development under Clause 44.06 before the gazettal of Amendment GC13.

 

Under Clause 44.06, any property under the BMO must apply for a planning permit to subdivide, or carry out building and works. Any application must abide by and meet the requirements of Clause 52.47 (Planning For Bushfire), unless specified in a schedule to the overlay.

 

 

 

Within the BMO area, every development application must be accompanied by:

·        A bushfire hazard site assessment including a plan that describes the bushfire hazard within 150 metres of the proposed development. The description of the hazard must be prepared in accordance with Sections 2.2.3 to 2.2.5 of AS3959:2009 Construction of buildings in bushfire prone areas (Standards Australia) excluding paragraph (a) of section 2.2.3.2. Photographs or other techniques may be used to assist in describing the bushfire hazard.

·        A bushfire hazard landscape assessment including a plan that describes the bushfire hazard of the general locality more than 150 metres from the site. Photographs or other techniques may be used to assist in describing the bushfire hazard. This requirement does not apply to a dwelling that includes all the approved measures specified in Clause 52.47-1.

·        A bushfire management statement describing how the proposed development responds to the requirements in this clause and Clause 44.06. If the application proposes an alternative measure, the bushfire management statement must explain how the alternative measure meets the relevant objective.

 

As the BMO is a new overlay for Maroondah, Council’s Statutory Planning Team will require training in the use and implementation of Clause 44.06. The Department of Environment, Land, Water, and Planning (DELWP) have offered to provide a training session for the Planning Department, to assist the team’s understanding of the challenges associated with the implementation when processing applications.

 

The Areas affected by the BMO are shown on map x in appendix 1, but is mainly the areas of: the north west and a small area to the south east of the municipality.

Financial / economic issues

The costs associated with providing training to the Maroondah Planning Department will be funded by State government. DELWP have also provided funding for a mail out to all owners/ occupiers of the affected properties detailing the changes and information postcards made available at key Council centres (Braeside Office, Croydon Office, and Realm).

 

The costs associated with the processing of any additional volume of development applications resulting from the introduction of the BMO will be met by Council through its existing budget.

Environmental / amenity issues

The clearing of vegetation is now permitted without a permit within the restrictions of the 10/50 rule. This may raise questions about the impact of the clearing of vegetation on the character and environment of the municipality.

Social / community issues

Not applicable.

 

 

Community consultation

Approximately 2,246 land owner and occupier notifications have been mailed regarding the 2,071 properties under the BMO. Council has made information regarding the BMO available on the Council’s webpage and information postcards available in key service centres.

Conclusion

Clause 44.06 Bushfire Management Overlay was introduced into the Maroondah Planning Scheme on 28 September 2017. The BMO affects 2,071 properties within the municipality.

 

Under the BMO, a new permit trigger applies to affected properties for subdivision or buildings and works unless specified otherwise by the overlay or by way of a schedule subsequently introduced by Council.

 

Implementation training and all community notification material have been supplied and fully funded by DELWP.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Maroondah GC13 BMO Mapping

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT COUNCIL NOTES THAT THE MINISTER FOR PLANNING HAS INTRODUCED THE BUSHFIRE MANAGEMENT OVERLAY TO 2,071 PROPERTIES IN MAROONDAH

 


DIRECTOR Planning & Community Phil Turner

 

Packaged Liquor Alchohol Density Project

Item 3

 

Purpose

To seek the authorisation of the Minister for Planning to prepare and exhibit a Group of Councils planning scheme amendment to introduce a local planning policy and other associated changes to the Local Planning Policy Framework relating to consideration of applications for packaged liquor licences.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A Safe Healthy and Active Community

Our Vision:  In the year 2040, Maroondah will be a safe, healthy and active community with local opportunities provided for people of all ages and abilities to have high levels of social, emotional and physical wellbeing.

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

A Safe Community

1.1     Work in partnership to address community safety issues, with a focus on activity   centres, public spaces, roads and public transport

1.2     Plan and advocate for the application of community safety principles that facilitate a       safe built environment

1.3     Promote and facilitate safer cultures relating to issues of alcohol, drugs, tobacco, gambling, child abuse and family violence

1.4     Encourage and support the implementation of initiatives and programs aimed at    improving the actual and perceived safety of the community

A Healthy Community

1.5     Facilitate the provision of affordable, accessible and responsive services, resources       and initiatives that support the physical and mental health and wellbeing of the          community

1.6     Actively promote health and wellbeing principles and initiatives within the community

Background

The South-East Melbourne Council Group (SEMCG) has recently completed a research project which aims to better understand the relationships between packaged liquor outlet density and increases in alcohol-related harms taking place, particularly in relation to family violence.

 

The research has aided the group in developing a suite of responses to address the increasing impacts of packaged liquor, which range from advocacy strategies and officer assessment toolkits to amendments to the planning scheme and new local planning policies.

 

The purpose of this report is to seek authorisation to undertake a Group of Councils (GC) Planning Scheme Amendment to introduce a local policy into each Council’s Planning Scheme to address Packaged Liquor Outlets.  The participating Councils comprise: Cardinia, Casey, Frankston, Greater Dandenong, Kingston, Knox, Maroondah and Mornington Peninsula (SEMCG).

 

Victoria Police data highlighted that these municipalities experience some of the highest levels of alcohol-related harm in Victoria, particularly in respects of family violence with statistics increasing rapidly.

 

The SEMCG has noted that off-premises outlets now significantly out-number on-premises venues. It is believed that packaged liquor outlet density is contributing to higher levels of alcohol consumption, particularly in the home and other private settings.

 

In 2013/14 a South East Melbourne Councils Consortium Working Group was established to investigate the link between licensed venue outlet density – particularly packaged liquor outlets – and alcohol-related harms; with the aim of minimising alcohol-related harm in the home (ie family violence) and in and around licensed venues and associated public places.

 

Phase 1 of the project, which is now completed, involved the appointment of a number of expert consultants from a range of fields including land use and social planning, economic analysis, and spatial mapping and demography and a number of reports were produced.

 

Key stakeholders from Victoria Police, Ambulance Victoria, Turning Point Drug and Alcohol Research and the Department of Justice also partnered in support of the work. The SEMCG was granted access to unique and highly sensitive crime data sets through an MOU with Victoria Police. This agreement has provided Councils with unprecedented access to data that reveals crime hot spots at a highly localised level.

 

Upon completion of Phase 1 it was identified that the project would benefit from the inclusion of two additional Councils to ensure the proof of concept in applying a planning policy had broader application.  As a result, the Cities of Knox and Maroondah partnered with the South-East Melbourne Council Group and have made a financial contribution to the project.

 

Phase 2 of the project, which is currently underway, comprises:

·        Update of data sets and spatial mapping to include the most recent participating Councils of the Cities of Knox and Maroondah, into the project evidence base.  It is anticipated that this updated data will be received in early 2018.

·        Preparation of a planning scheme amendment to introduce a local planning policy into each planning scheme to address the identified policy gaps.

·        Advocacy for improvements to State policy frameworks (eg advocating for change to the Victoria Planning Provisions across all Planning Schemes in Victoria, which can only be undertaken by the Minister for Planning)

·        Development of decision-making guidelines, tools, and mapping solutions to support Council staff dealing with liquor licence and planning permit applications.

 

The project is the first of its type in Australia where detailed consideration has been given to better understanding, at a localised level, the correlations between packaged alcohol and an increase in alcohol-related crime and violence.  Participating Councils have partnered with agencies and academia to explore the relationships and find appropriate responses.

Issue / discussion

Phase 1 - Evidence, Research and Key Findings

 

The purpose of the SEMCG research in Phase 1 of the project was to collect sound evidence on the extent to which the sale of alcohol for consumption off the premises (ie packaged liquor) is a determinant of the social, economic and physical health and wellbeing of a community.  The research aimed to provide an insight into the relationship between packaged liquor licences, other types of liquor licences and the role of Local Government, including the following:

·        General alcohol consumption patterns in the South-East Melbourne Council areas.

·        Factors that could make the South-East Melbourne Council areas more vulnerable to an increase in the number of packaged liquor licences within the community eg population growth, socio-demographic profile, etc.

·        Factors that are contributing to the increase in applications for packaged liquor licences.

·        The relationship between alcohol consumption and discretionary spend, particularly in relation to basic needs such as food, health and housing.

·        The relationship between the location of packaged liquor outlets, alcohol incidents and family violence.

 

Phase 1 of the project also reviewed the current legislative framework, focusing on the role of Local Government in liquor regulation, making a number of recommendations for legislative change and advocacy.

 

Broad sector trends in alcohol consumption suggest that nearly 80% of alcohol consumed in Australia is sold at packaged liquor outlets, and this proportion has steadily increased over time (see Livingston M (2012) The social gradient of alcohol availability in Victoria, Australia, Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 36, 41-47.) The density of packaged liquor outlets in Victoria has grown steadily since the early 2000s, as have rates of alcohol-related harm among both adults and young people: ‘These broadly correlated trends are consistent with the substantial international research literature linking the density of alcohol outlets in a neighbourhood to the rate of alcohol-related problems experienced in that neighbourhood.’ (Livingston, 2013, p. 5).  The same study identified that:


 

 

In an average Melbourne postcode, a 10% increase in packaged liquor outlet density is likely to lead to approximately:

·        1% increase in assaults recorded by the police;

·        0.5% increase in hospitalisations due to assault;

·        3.3% percent increase in family violence incidents recorded by the police;

·        1.9% increase in hospitalisations due to alcohol-specific chronic disease.

·        In disadvantaged suburbs, a 10% increase in packaged liquor outlets is likely to lead to a 2% increase in assaults and 12% increase in family violence.

Further academic evidence has also found that:

 

Packaged liquor outlets have been found to be consistently associated with violence in suburban areas (Livingston, 2008);

·        Major changes in the retail availability of alcohol have been found to change drinking behaviour.  Increases in supply have been shown to lead to increases in consumption while, conversely, decreased supply has reduced risky behaviour (Livingston, 2013);

·        Increasing regular strength beer sales in a given geographical area is associated with a greater rate of increase in assaults in private premises compared with those on licensed premises (Chikritzhs et al, 2007).

The research undertaken in Phase 1 found that the key packaged liquor statistics in the South-East region of Melbourne are as follows:

·        Average spending per adult on packaged liquor is $800 per year (compared to $820 in metropolitan Melbourne).

·        Per capita expenditures on packaged liquor at the municipal level shows that the average expenditures for growth area municipalities in the South-East region (Cardinia $810 and Casey $800) exceed the average for municipalities in other growth areas in Melbourne (Hume $720, Whittlesea $690 and Wyndham $760).

·        361 packaged liquor outlets.

·        Estimated 58,250sqm leasable retail floor space of packaged liquor outlets.

·        Average size of packaged liquor outlet is 160m2.

·        Average spending currently supports 79m2 packaged liquor floor space per 1,000 adults across the region (City of Casey is currently 91m2).

·        Total sales of packaged liquor estimated to be $675 million per year.

·        Total sales forecast to be $720 million in 2021.

·        The municipalities of Casey and Cardinia are expected to provide the majority of the new floor space for packaged liquor outlets in 2021 (about 60%).  For Casey, this equates to an additional 4,990m2, and would result in an average provision of 92m2/1,000 adults (with the average in the region being 81m2).  This compares to the existing average spending on packaged liquor in metropolitan Melbourne which supports 80m2 of packaged liquor floor space per 1,000 adults.

 

Legislative & Policy Gaps

 

The research undertaken in Phase 1 found that there are legislative and policy gaps when it comes to addressing the harms from Packaged Liquor.

 

The regulation of liquor sales and consumption in Victoria is primarily directed by the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 and the Planning and Environment Act 1987.

 

The Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 regulates the sale and consumption of liquor through the issuing of liquor licences. The Act aims to minimise harm and ensure that the supply of liquor contributes to, and does not detract from, the amenity of community life.

 

The Planning and Environment Act 1987 provides a framework for the use, development and protection of land in Victoria. In determining planning permit applications responsible authorities have an obligation to consider any significant social and economic effects of a proposed use or development.

 

The Victoria Planning Provisions include State-standard strategies and provisions that apply to every planning scheme in the State. They include a provision relating to Licensed Premises (Clause 52.27) which seeks to ensure that licensed premises are appropriately located and that their impact on the amenity of the surrounding area is considered in decision-making.  A planning permit is required for many types of licensed premises, including packaged liquor licenses.

 

The Licensed Premises provisions require the cumulative impact of licensed premises to be taken into account when making a decision. Nevertheless, the decision guidelines focus on the amenity rather than social or economic impacts of licensed premises. As such the provisions have been interpreted in a commensurately narrow manner.

 

In addition to the Licensed Premises provisions, planning zones determine where particular uses may be conducted without the need for a planning permit, with a planning permit, or where they are prohibited.  Liquor Licences and planning permits for the sale and consumption of alcohol may only be issued in association with specifically defined land uses under the Victoria Planning Provisions.

 

The operation of the Licensed Premises provisions has been tested on a number of occasions during planning appeals before the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT).  Key findings relevant to this study are:

·        The use of land for a licensed premise is a lawful use, therefore cannot be considered unacceptable in a general sense (Duxtar v Port Phillip CC).

·        The Licensed Premises Clause 52.27 focuses on spatial and amenity considerations. As such, concerns about the social impact of an individual licensed premises will rarely be a relevant consideration in decision making (Hunt Club v Casey CC (Red Dot)).

·        There are risks in relying on Practice Note 61 Licensed Premises: Assessing Cumulative Impact for the purposes of assessing packaged liquor outlet applications due to its emphasis on ‘amenity’ related impacts.

·        The concept of amenity is not just limited to pleasantness; it includes all the features, benefits and advantages inherent in an environment (Lobb v City of Waverley).

·        It is unhelpful to try and define the term ‘amenity’ for planning purposes, rather it should be assessed according to the circumstances of the case (Swancom v Yarra CC).

·        The concept of harm minimisation is a relevant consideration under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998. This concept is not extended into the Victoria Planning Provisions.

·        The interpretation of the cumulative impact of licensed premises is heavily influenced by decisions relating to on-premises licenses and Practice Note 61: Licensed Premises. Given the narrow construction of Clause 52.27 the utility of the concept in relation to packaged liquor premises is currently limited (see Hunt Club v Casey CC (Red Dot)).

·        The lack of need for a facility is unlikely to be a relevant consideration in deciding on a liquor application (Barkersgrove v Greater Bendigo CC).

·        The decision guidelines of Clause 52.27 limit the capacity to create an evidentiary link between the relative disadvantage of an area and the amenity impact of approving a licensed premise (Coles Group v Mornington Peninsula).

·        A key challenge for decision-making is establishing evidence that is location-specific and accurately links harms to their source.

 

Planisphere's Final Report found that "the Licensed Premises provisions require the cumulative impact of licensed premises to be considered when making a decision. Nevertheless, the decision guidelines focus on the amenity rather than social or economic impacts of licensed premises. As such the provisions have been interpreted in a commensurately narrow manner".

 

Accordingly the existing planning framework for assessing packaged liquor outlets needs improvement. Existing policy and regulations provide insufficient basis for community health, wellbeing and safety to be considered in the assessment of licensed premises. Considerations are currently limited to the amenity of the area surrounding the application site. Assessment guidelines are geared more towards inner city on-premises venues. Several of the current planning considerations are irrelevant or ill-fitted to packaged liquor outlet proposals. In addition to this, creating an evidentiary link between a proposed outlet and its potential harm as a basis for refusal is extremely challenging.

 

 

 

Discussions with State Government

 

The Consortia has met with various representatives of the State Government on several occasions to discuss the work that the group has been undertaking and to gauge how to effectively address the gaps in planning.  During recent discussions there has been concerns from the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) about whether planning has a role to play in this space or whether the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 is the vehicle to address these issues.

 

The Final Report prepared by Planisphere as part of Phase 1 of the project concluded that “Planning has a legitimate role to play in liquor regulation.  The liquor licensing system in isolation cannot adequately address strategic planning, local impact assessment and community engagement in its decisions.  On the other hand, the planning system is able to consider the spatial context of an application including its relationship with other licensed venues and their cumulative impact”.

 

It is the opinion of the Consortia that the draft policy does fall within the ambit of planning.  In particular, a local policy addressing social effects of packaged liquor outlets directed to reducing alcohol related harm by reference to geographic or spatial considerations is consistent with the Planning and Environment Act, the Victoria Planning Provisions and relevant decisions of the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal.

 

Policy Implications

 

The project found that the policy in the Planning Schemes for all Councils is broad, and is more concerned with addressing issues around on-premises liquor outlets, that is, pubs, clubs, taverns and the like, where the amenity impacts generally occur in the immediate area around these types of premises.

 

The State Planning Policy Framework (SPPF) at Clause 10 provides a general policy context without specific reference to licensed premises. It aims to concentrate retail functions in activity centres, with a greater variety of uses and functions to be available in higher order activity centres.

 

Consistent with the objectives of Local Government under the Local Government Act 1989, municipal planning authorities are required to identify the potential for regional impacts in their decision-making and co-ordinate strategic planning with their neighbours and other public bodies to achieve sustainable development and effective and efficient use of resources.’

 

Clause 52.27 (Licensed Premises) is a provision that provides policy in all Planning Schemes for licensed premises, and lists requirements regarding when a planning permit is required for a liquor licence as well as decision guidelines for consideration of these type of applications. Interestingly, a planning permit is required for a packaged liquor outlet, but there is very little policy guidance about how to assess the cumulative impacts from packaged liquor outlets as the decision guidelines are only applicable to On-premises liquor licences.

 

Practice Note 61 was prepared by the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning to advise how to assess applications under Clause 52.27 but it focusses on On-premises liquor licences and provides very little guidance on Packaged Liquor.

 

As the State Government appears unwilling at this time to address this issue at a State Planning Policy level, the Consortia have decided to under a Group Planning Scheme Amendment to introduce a new Local Policy and other supporting changes into each participating Council's Planning Scheme.  The aim of the GC Amendment is to broaden the considerations applicable to packaged liquor licence applications, to include social and economic considerations and the cumulative impacts from packaged liquor outlets.

 

The creation of successful local policies relating to packaged liquor outlets is contingent upon reforms to Clause 52.27 that would broaden the statutory head of power and decision guidelines that currently confine the responsible authority’s field of enquiry. In developing local policy in relation to packaged liquor, analogies with gaming machine gambling policies are obvious.

 

The above approach is also consistent with how Councils have dealt with Electronic Gaming Machine (EGM) applications under clause 52.28 of the planning scheme which has been supported by State Government previously.

 

Smart Planning Reform

 

The Smart Planning Reform is a Victorian Government lead initiative that was launched in July 2016. Smart Planning is a two-year program to reform Victoria’s planning system.

The objectives of the Smart Planning reform are to:

·        Simplify planning regulation – this will improve the quality, consistency and efficiency of planning decision making.

·        Develop digital systems that allow citizens, industry and government to more easily access and understand planning rules and processes – this will boost activity, participation and efficiency.

A Smart Planning Discussion Paper was released, with comments due by 1 December 2017.  Given that these reforms are currently at the consultation stage, it is difficult to speculate how they may impact on planning permit applications for licenced premises. The particular provisions of Victorian Planning Schemes is one area where reform is proposed, which may also impact upon the specific content of Clause 52.27 - Licensed Premises, and the permit triggers for different types of licensed premises.

 

Maroondah Council has reviewed the Smart Planning Reform Discussion Paper and lodged a submission into the issues raised in this report.  This includes advocating for the retention of key permit triggers and provisions within Clause 52.27, and where possible improved provisions, to facilitate appropriate consideration of the social and economic impacts of licensed premises, including the consideration of the cumulative impact of packaged liquor outlets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed GC Amendment

 

The proposed GC amendment seeks to:

·        Introduce a new local planning policy into the Local Planning Policy Framework to provide new policy considerations for assessment of planning applications for liquor licences for packaged liquor outlets. Key considerations of the policy include:

-        Ensuring the cumulative impact of packaged liquor floorspace is assessed;

-        Managing the location, floor area and type of packaged liquor outlets so as to avoid and mitigate potential amenity impacts;

-        Ensuring the assessment of amenity impacts from packaged liquor outlets includes consideration of community health, wellbeing and safety;

-        Minimising the potential for alcohol-related transferred harm associated with off-premises consumption of products purchased from packaged liquor;

-        Directing large format packaged liquor outlets into higher order activity centres (where they are accessible but not convenient), and discouraging stand-alone packaged liquor outlets in out-of centre locations;

-        Discouraging packaged liquor outlets in areas of highest social disadvantage, and to discourage outlets in proximity to schools and health services that provide drug, alcohol or mental health treatment; and

-        Requiring Social Impact Assessments to be included as part of the application assessment process where packaged liquor outlets are large format (ie net floorspace over 1,000m2), or would result in an oversupply of packaged liquor floorspace in a local area (ie over the metropolitan standard of 80m2 of packaged liquor floorspace per 1,000 adults).

·        Make associated changes to the Municipal Strategic Statement to include policy support for the new local planning policy at a broad strategic level.

·        Make changes to the referral and notice provisions at Clause 66.06 to require the referral of applications for packaged liquor licence to Victoria Police and the Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR).

 

A copy of the proposed amendment documentation, including the Explanatory Report is attached.

 

Overall, the proposed local policy, together with associated documents, is seeking to provide Council with an improved decision-making framework for packaged liquor outlets, which will require a more rigorous assessment process when applications present a higher risk of alcohol related harm.  The draft policy is not designed to prohibit, but is designed to encourage applicants to submit more detailed information to Council, which may include a social impact assessment and other locational considerations.  The aim is to have more informed decisions on whether an application would increase the incidence of alcohol related harms by taking into account the local context and cumulative impact of packaged liquor outlets in the area.

 

Financial / economic issues

Costs associated with the project are incorporated within Council’s existing budget.  It is noted that undertaking this amendment as a combined process with other Councils results in considerable cost savings.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not applicable

Social / community issues

Not applicable

ALCOHOL DATA

The following data is a snapshot from the attached Review of Alcohol Data for Maroondah and the EMR (Turning Point, 2014/15).

·        The vast majority of alcohol consumed in Australia – an estimated 80% - is sold at packaged outlets.  Maroondah has 250 liquor licences (as at August 2017), 30 of which are packaged liquor outlets.

·        Maroondah has the highest rate of alcohol-related assaults during high alcohol hours (ie 8pm to 6am Friday and Saturday nights) in the EMR, at 8.3 per 10,000 population. 

·        The alcohol assault rate for young people in Maroondah aged 18-24 years is 25.4 per 10,000 population, higher than the outer east average (16.1) and almost 5 times higher than the inner-east average (7.2).

·        Maroondah has the 2nd highest rate of definite alcohol family violence in the EMR (9.3 per 10,000 population), after Yarra ranges (9.5) and above Knox (6).  The outer east experiences significantly higher rates of alcohol-related family violence than the inner East.

·        Maroondah ranks highest in the EMR for alcohol only-related ambulance attendance at 333 per 100,000 population.

Community consultation

Over the course of the project to date participating Councils have received significant input and support from organisations including: Victoria Police, Ambulance Victoria, VEDA Applied Credit, Medicare Locals, Department of Health and Department of Justice.

 

A Public Exhibition process will be undertaken as part of the Planning Scheme Amendment to meet statutory requirements. This will involve direct notification of relevant stakeholders including the liquor industry, local community groups and relevant organisations. As part of this, notices will also be placed in the relevant local newspapers, and will be made available on Council’s website. The Amendment will also be placed on exhibition for an additional two weeks beyond the normal statutory period of one month.

 

In addition to the above the consortium will pursue additional consultation will relevant stakeholders and interested parties.

Conclusion

Local government has a legitimate and important role to play in addressing alcohol-related harm, through its statutory responsibilities under both the Planning & Environment Act 1987 and the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998. Research undertaken by the participating Councils found that Councils need stronger policy support in their planning schemes to be able to effectively do this.

 

This GC Amendment request will ensure that this unique body of research can now progress and be translated into a planning solution which provides Councils with an opportunity to better consider and address the cumulative impacts that arise from the density of packaged liquor outlets in sensitive community locations.

 

The successful implementation of a planning policy will provide greater guidance to Councils when considering applications for packaged liquor licences, ensuring more informed decision-making which takes into consideration the community health and wellbeing of local communities.

 

 

Attachments

1.

SEMCA Liquor Licensing - Packaged Liquor Local Policy

2.

SEMCA Liquor Licensing - Draft Explanatory Report

3.

SEMCA Liquor Licensing - Background Report Addendum

4.

SEMCA Liquor Licensing - Explanatory Report

5.

SE Melb Alcohol Research Final Report Planisphere

6.

Packaged Liquor Practice Note Draft

7.

Review of Alcohol Data for Maroondah and the EMR 6 December 2017

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That

1.       Council writes to the Minister for Planning to seek authorisation, under Section 9(2) of the Planning and Environment Act 1987, to prepare a GC Amendment to the Planning Schemes of all participating Councils.

2.       subject to receiving the authorisation of the Minister for Planning under Part 1, Council gives notice of the GC Amendment in accordance with Section 19 of the Planning and Environment Act 1987.

3.       Council officers be authorised to make minor changes to the amendment documentation, as recommended by the PROJECT Working Group, in response to any updated legal or planning advice, prior to seeking authorisation.

 


DIRECTOR Planning & Community Phil Turner

 

Update on 2016 Census results

Item 4

 

Purpose

To provide Council with an update on the results arising from the 2016 Australian Bureau of Statistics Census of Population and Housing.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  An inclusive and diverse community

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an inclusive community where social connections are strong across generations and diversity is embraced and celebrated.

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

7.11 Ensure the needs of community members from all ages, backgrounds and lifestyles       are considered in planning for local services, programs and infrastructure

7.14 Establish a built environment that is child, youth and age friendly through     strengthening the inclusiveness and accessibility of our local neighbourhoods and activity centres

Background

The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) undertakes a Census of Population and Housing every five years to provide a snapshot of the Australian community over time. The Census provides one of the few open data sources of information relating to small geographic areas and population groups.

 

The 2016 Census was undertaken in October 2016. The first set of data was released in June 2017. The second set of data was released on 23 October 2017. A summary of high level results relevant to Maroondah is attached.

 

The key organisational resource for Census information is Profile.id which is developed and maintained by id Consulting. Profile.id provides detailed Census related information over time using small geographical areas as customised by Council. A supporting resource entitled Atlas.id shows certain datasets spatially. Both resources have been updated with data from the first release, with second release data being updated during December 2017 and January 2018.

 

Further releases of ABS Census 2016 results will be made available during 2018 including SEIFA, small area data and additional cross tabulations.

Issue / discussion

The 2016 ABS Census of Population and Housing results provide an insight into the changing demographics of the Maroondah community.

 

Some key findings from the Census results specific to Maroondah include:

·        Our population is ageing, but at a slower rate than Victoria and Australia;

·        There is a lower proportion of young people in Maroondah than 10 years ago;

·        Median rent for Maroondah households has increased by 17.5% since 2011;

·        Mortgage stress levels are higher than both Victorian and Australian levels;

·        The median personal income is 8% higher than the Victorian median income;

·        The number of overseas born residents increased by 3,796 from 2011 to 2016;

·        The proportion of Chinese born residents has increased significantly since 2006;

·        Our Chin Haka speaking residents comprise almost 38% of the total Victorian population who speak this language;

·        There has been a 69% increase in Indigenous residents since the 2006 Census;

·        The proportion reporting a Christian religion has dropped by 14% since 2006.

·        Almost 5% of Maroondah population require assistance for daily core activities, growing to over 10% for those aged over 65.

·        Almost two-thirds of the Maroondah population participate in the labour force – a level higher than the national rate but a lower rate than five years ago – perhaps resulting from an ageing population;

·        Youth unemployment in Maroondah has increased since 2011, but remains lower than the national average;

·        There has been a 5% decrease in the proportion of Maroondah residents working in manufacturing and a 3% decrease working in retail trade;

·        The rate of public transport use for commuters in Maroondah has increased slightly since 2011;

·        1 in 5 people in Maroondah are volunteers. The level of volunteering by residents remains higher than the Victorian and Australian average;

·        Migration of residents into Maroondah continues to grow over both 1 and 5 year timeframes.

More details on each of these findings can be found in the sections below along with the attached factsheets.

Financial / economic issues

Some key financial and economic findings include:

·        The median personal income in Maroondah is $696 per week, which is 8% higher than the Victorian median income.

·        The median family household is $1,544 in 2016, compared with $1,305 in 2011.

·        A total of 17.6% of households in Maroondah have a weekly household income of less than $650, which is lower than both the Victorian and Australian average. Almost 16% of households in Maroondah have a weekly income of more than $3000.

·        Warranwood is the Maroondah suburb with the highest median household income of $2,376 per week, followed by Croydon Hills with a median household income of $2,047. Ringwood is the suburb with the lowest median household income in Maroondah of $1,356 per week.

·        Almost two-thirds of the Maroondah population participate in the labour force (64.6%), higher than the national rate (60.3%), but lower than in 2006 (65.6%).

·        Maroondah’s labour force unemployment on the Census date was 5.2%, lower than both the Victorian (6.6%) Australian (6.9%) levels.

·        Youth unemployment for 15-24 year olds in Maroondah was 12.0%, lower than the Australian rate (14.9%), but higher than in 2011 (9.9%).

·        The most common occupations in Maroondah were Professionals (23.7%), Clerical and Administrative Workers (15.1%), Technicians and Trades Workers (14.9%), Managers (12.5%), and Community and Personal Service Workers (10.6%). The biggest shifts since 2006 have seen a 4.1% increase in the proportion of Professionals and a 1.9% increase in community and personal service workers

·        The most common industry of employment for Maroondah labour force was health care and social services (13.2%), followed by retail trade (10.8%), construction (10.1%), and education and training (9.7%). The biggest shifts since 2006 have seen a 5% decrease in the proportion of the labour force working in manufacturing, a 2.4% increase in health care and social services, a 2.0% decrease in retail trade, and a 1.9% increase in education and training.

·        The most common categories of workplaces for Maroondah residents were hospitals (4%) whilst primary education (2.6%), supermarket and grocery stores (2.3%), aged care residential services (2.2%) and computer systems and services (2.1%).

Environmental / amenity issues

Some key environmental and amenity findings include:

·        On the day of the Census, two thirds of employed people in Maroondah travelled to work as a driver in a car (66.6%) and a further 3.7% as a car passenger.

·        Use of public transport to travel to work in Maroondah has increased slightly from 10.4% in 2011 to 11.8% in 2016. This remains a lower rate than the Victorian average (12.6%)

·        More than 58% of households had two or more registered motor vehicles garaged or parked at their address.

Social / community issues

Some key social and community findings include:

·        The 2016 Census counted 110,376 people living in Maroondah, an 6.3% increase since the last census in 2011, meaning an additional 109 people are moving into the municipality each month. The official current population estimate for the City of Maroondah as at 30 June 2016 is 114,979.

·        As a community, we are gradually getting older. The median age in Maroondah is 38 years in 2016, compared with 37 years in 2006.

·        These has been an increase in the proportion of the population in Maroondah aged 65 years and over, which grew to 16.0% in 2016, compared with 13.9% in 2006.

·        The suburb with the oldest median age is Ringwood North (41 years) whilst the youngest median age is Bayswater North (36 years). The most youthful suburb is Warranwood with 20.8% of the suburb population are aged between 0 and 14 years. The second most youthful suburb is Heathmont with 19.9% aged 0 to 14 years.

·        Most people in Maroondah live in a separate house (88.2%), followed by townhouses (8.8%) and apartments (2.5%).

·        Of all occupied private dwellings in Maroondah, a total of 32.7% are owned outright, 40.6% are owned with a mortgage and 23.9% are rented.

·        The proportion of rented households where the weekly rental payments are 30% of more of the household income is 8.8%, a lower proportion compared with the Victorian (10.4%) and Australian (11.5%) average.

·        In contrast, the proportion of households where the weekly mortgage payments are 30% of more of the household income is 7.9%, a higher proportion than both the Victorian (7.5%) and Australian (7.2%) average.

·        Couple families with children remained the dominant household type in Maroondah (34.6%), increasing slightly from 2011.

·        Just over half of the Maroondah population aged over 15 (50.6%) are married.

·        The number of people living in Maroondah who were born overseas increased by 3,796 between the 2011 and 2016 censuses, rising from 21% of the population in 2011 to 23% in 2016. The most common countries of birth outside Australia were England 4.0%, China (excluding Taiwan) 2.7%, India 1.7%, Myanmar 1.6% and New Zealand 1.2%.

·        The majority of the Maroondah population (78.8%) only speak English at home. Other common languages spoken at home include Mandarin 3.3%, Cantonese 1.3%, Chin Haka 1.0%, Italian 0.7% and Hindi 0.6%.

·        In the 2016 Census, 534 people in Maroondah identified as being of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin, making up 0.5% of the population.

·        Almost 38% of Maroondah residents reported living in a different address five years ago. This level of migration is higher than reported in 2011 (34.8%).

·        In the year before the 2016 Census, 1 in 5 people in Maroondah did voluntary work through an organisation or a group (21.1%). This volunteering rate is higher than the rates for Victoria (19.2%) and Australia (19%).

·        During the two weeks before the Census, 30.8% of Maroondah residents provided care for children and 12.0% assisted family members or others due to a disability, long term illness or age-related issues.

·        A total of 4.9% of the Maroondah population require assistance for daily core activities. The proportion is higher for people aged over 65 in Maroondah, with 10.5% of this age group reporting they need assistance for daily core activities

·        The most common religion reported by people living in Maroondah is Christian 54.8%, followed by 36.3% reporting no religious affiliation.

Community consultation

Not applicable

Conclusion

Results from the 2016 Australian Bureau of Statistics Census of Population and Housing provides Council with useful insights into changing demographics and social trends within the Maroondah community. This information can be used for a wide range of service delivery and infrastructure planning purposes.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Maroondah Summary Results - ABS Census 2016 1st Release Data - July 2017

2.

Maroondah Summary Results - ABS Census 2016 2nd Release Data - October 2017

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL NOTES UPDATED DEMOGRAPHIC INFORMATION FOR THE MAROONDAH COMMUNITY ARISING FROM THE 2016 AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS CENSUS OF POPULATION AND HOUSING

 


DIRECTOR Planning & Community Phil Turner

 

Domestic Animal Management Plan

Item 5

 

Purpose

To present to Council the draft Domestic Animal Management Plan 2017-2021 (regarding the provisions for the control of dogs and cats in Maroondah) in accordance with Department of Economic Development, Jobs, Transport, and Resources (DEDJTR) requirements and to seek Council’s approval to adopt the plan.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2017-2021 (Year 1: 2017-2018) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:    A Safe Community

                            A Healthy Community

                            An Active Community

                            A Well Governed Community

 

A safe, healthy and active community

In 2040, Maroondah is a safe, healthy and active community with local opportunities provided for people of all ages and abilities to have high levels of social, emotional, and physical wellbeing.

Our Vision:  Maroondah will be a vibrant and diverse city with a healthy and active community, living in green and leafy neighbourhoods which are connected to thriving and accessible activity centres contributing to a prosperous economy within a safe, inclusive and sustainable environment.

Key Directions 2017 – 2018:

A SAFE COMMUNITY

1.1.1    Work in partnership to address community safety issues, with a focus on activity centres, public spaces, roads and public transport

1.1.3    Promote and facilitate safer cultures relating to issues of alcohol, drugs, tobacco, gambling, child abuse and family violence

A HEALTHY COMMUNITY

1.2.1 Facilitate the provision of affordable, accessible and responsive services, resources and initiatives that support the physical and mental health and wellbeing of the community

An Active Community

1.3.1  Enhance and maintain an integrated and connected network of passive and active open space to promote community health and wellbeing

 

A WELL GOVERNED COMMUNITY

8.1.1 Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

The Domestic Animals Act 1994 establishes a legislative requirement on Local Government to prepare, implement and annually report on its Domestic Animal Management Plan (DAMP).

 

Council’s first DAMP came into effect for 2008 – 2011 and was followed by the 2013 – 2017 DAMP.

 

All Councils are required to have in place a DAMP for a period of four (4) years with an annual review. Council has conducted a significant review of its current DAMP and the 2017 – 2021 DAMP consolidates and continues the significant work carried out by Council over the past four years.

 

The primary purpose of a DAMP is to detail both Council’s service delivery actions and resident’s responsibilities for dog and cat management within a municipality. Council’s new DAMP 2017-2021 (Attachment 2) continues a proactive approach to animal management and will provide a sound basis and direction for Council to make future decisions.

 

The development of the DAMP was broken into five stages, being:

·        An initial data, technical literature and best practice review;

·        Internal Council consultation across a range of relevant service areas;

·        Broader community and interest group consultation on their values, views, and any issues they had relating to domestic animal ownership and management;

·        Development of the draft DAMP using the information and resources from the first three stages; and

·        Formal exhibition the new DAMP from 9 November to 8 December 2017 for further community input and comment.

 

The draft 2017-2021 DAMP is broken into six key areas, and puts in place a set of actions and dates for Council to address over the next four years. There will be ongoing monitoring of the DAMP with annual review and reporting.

 

Keys areas in the DAMP are:

·        Achievements over the past four years

·        Animal Management Services in Maroondah

·        Strategic Framework for Animal Management

-        Service Management

-        Registration and Identification

-        Dealing with Nuisance Issues

-        Dog Attacks

-        Welfare of Pets

-        Domestic Animal Business

-        Provision for Dogs Off Leash

·        Action Plan with timeframes

·        Planning for Pets and Pet Owners

·        How Council will implement the DAMP

Financial / economic issues

The costs of implementing the Domestic Animal Management Plan will be met through existing budgets.

Environmental / amenity issues

The Domestic Animal Management Plan assists in achieving the Council Plan strategies that seek to promote positive environmental and safety outcomes for the community.

Social / community issues

The Domestic Animal Management Plan assists in achieving the Council Plan strategies that seek to promote and encourage positive health, safety and wellbeing for the community.

Community consultation

Council consulted with the community in various forums. In the first instance the community were asked numerous questions regarding Council’s current DAMP and what was important to the community about domestic animals as pets using an online survey through Council’s website (see Attachment 1 for survey).

 

A summary of the content in the survey questions are as follows:

·        How important pets are to people who live in Maroondah

·        Concerns you may have about animal related matters

·        Ideas and resources to assist residents to manage and care for their pets

·        Dogs in parks and reserves

·        Suggestions that ensure pets and people live together harmoniously

·        How effective is the information provided by Council about pets and animal management

 

Council received a total 114 survey submissions.  These are grouped in two categories, online survey submissions from 89 people and email submissions from 25 people. A number of these submissions assisted Council in forming the action plan within the DAMP.

 

Finally, the next forum the community were asked to comment on was the public exhibition of the draft DAMP from 9 November to 8 December. This was advertised in the Maroondah Leader and exhibited electronically on Council’s website with hard copies located at each of Council’s customer service centres.

There were two submissions received from the exhibition period. Both of the submissions supported the draft DAMP and provided clarification on titles of names for organisations, which were accepted and incorporated into the DAMP.

Conclusion

Council continues to work with the community to ensure the management of dogs and cats is in accordance with State Government legislation, local government sector guidance, benchmarks and Maroondah community expectations. Council has continued to plan and consult to ensure that its Domestic Animal Management Plan meets these needs and expectations.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Community Survey for DAMP 2017-2021

2.

Draft DAMP 2017-2021

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL:

1.       ADOPTS THE MAROONDAH DOMESTIC ANIMAL MANAGEMENT PLAN 2017 – 2021 AT ATTACHMENT 2

2.       AUTHORISES THE DIRECTOR OF PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT TO SUBMIT THE MAROONDAH DOMESTIC ANIMAL MANAGEMENT PLAN 2017 – 2021 TO THE SECRETARY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, JOBS, TRANSPORT AND RESOUCES.

 

  


DOCUMENTS FOR SEALING

 

 

Letter Under Seal - Mr Frank Sullivan

ITEM 1

 

Letters under seal

Background

Mr Frank Sullivan has served the Maroondah community for a period exceeding twenty-five years by his outstanding work with Ringwood Blues/Ringwood Spiders all abilities sports club. He has recently announced his standing down from the Ringwood Spiders Committee and hence is an opportune time for Council to recognise his many achievements. From Coach to Committee member, advocate, promoter, supporter and friend Frank has significantly positively influenced the lives of members, players, families, friends, local schools and disability support organisations alike and is to be congratulated for his diligence, persistence, commitment and outstanding preparedness to ensure all people, irrespective of circumstances have an equal opportunity to sporting and social activities.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

That council signs and seals A LETTER UNDER SEAL TO MR FRANK SULLIVAN IN RECOGNITION OF HIS OUTSTANDING WORK TO THE MAROONDAH COMMUNITY AND DISADVANTAGED PERSONS FOR A PERIOD EXCEEDING TWENTY-FIVE YEARS.