2014 Maroondah Logo RGB.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Councillor

(as addressed)

 

 

 

The next Council Meeting will be held in the Council Chamber, Braeside Avenue, Ringwood, on Monday 24 August 2015, commencing at 7:30pm and your presence is requested.

 

 

Yours faithfully

 

SKozlows.jpg

 

Steve Kozlowski

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

 

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Council Chamber
is fitted with a Hearing Aid Induction Loop

 

Switch Hearing Aid to ‘T’ for Reception

 

City Offices

Braeside Avenue, Ringwood, 3134

Postal

PO Box 156, Ringwood 3134

DX 38068, Ringwood

Telephone

1300 88 22 33

 

 

Facsimile

Email

Web

 

Service Centres

Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS): 131 450

National Relay Service (NRS): 133 677

(03) 9298 4345

maroondah@maroondah.vic.gov.au

www.maroondah.vic.gov.au

 

Croydon: Civic Square

Ringwood: 1 Civic Place, Ringwood

 


 

 


ORDER OF BUSINESS

1.       Prayer

2.       Acknowledgment of Country

3.       Apologies  

4.       Declaration of Interests

5.       Confirmation of Minutes of the Ordinary Council Meeting held on Monday 20 July 2015.

6.       Public Questions

7.       Officers’ Reports

Director Corporate Services

1.       Attendance Reports                                                                                                  4

2.       Reports of Assembly of Councillors                                                                         6

3.       Councillor Representation Reports                                                                           9

4.       Approval in Principle of 2014/2015 Annual Financial Report & Annual Performance Statement                                                                                                                11

5.       Audit & Risk Advisory Committee Report                                                              17

6.       Local Government Rate Capping and Variation Framework Review                    19

Acting Director Operations, Infrastructure & Leisure

1.       Petition - Churchill Street, Ringwood
Request for Parking Restriction Modification                                                         26

2.       2015/2016 Community Grants Funding Program                                                  34

3.       Community Assistance Fund                                                                                  38

4.       Community Facilities Lease Agreement for Norwood Sporting Club Pty Ltd        41

Director Planning & Community

1.       Active and Healthy Ageing Initiative - Towards an Age-friendly Maroondah         44

2.       Draft Maroondah Public Art Policy                                                                         47

3.       Draft Maroondah Community Engagement Policy                                                50

4.       Draft Maroondah Children's Plan 2015-2019                                                         54   

8.       Motions to Review  

9.       Late Item

10.     Requests / Leave of Absence

 

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Attendance Reports

Item 1

 

Purpose

To provide an opportunity for Councillors to report on Council activities undertaken since the last Ordinary Meeting of Council and forthcoming ward activities.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2013-2017 (Year 3: 2015-2016) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2014 – 2015:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

Not Applicable

Issue / discussion

It is intended that the Mayor and Councillors be given the opportunity to present a verbal or written report updating Council on the activities they have undertaken in their role as Councillors and forthcoming ward activities.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

It is appropriate that Councillors formally report to Council upon the activities they have undertaken in their role as Councillors.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE REPORTS AS PRESENTED BY COUNCILLORS

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Reports of Assembly of Councillors

Item 2

 

Purpose

To present the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings at the City Offices Ringwood, usually two weeks prior to the formal Council Meeting, and to note the issues discussed.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2013-2017 (Year 3: 2015-2016) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2014 – 2015:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

Background

An Assembly of Councillors, as defined under the Local Government Act 1989 [s.3], is a planned or scheduled meeting, comprising at least five (5) Councillors and one (1) member of Council staff, that considers matters that are intended or likely to be:

 

·                the subject of a decision of the Council; or

·                subject to the exercise of a delegated function, duty or power of Council

Examples of an Assembly of Councillors may include:

 

·        Councillor Briefings (which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings),

·        On-site inspections,

·        Consultative Meetings with residents, developers, consultants,

·        Panel Hearings conducted under s223 of the Act,

·        Meetings with local organisations, Government Departments, statutory authorities, and local politicians

Issue / discussion

As part of decision making processes at Maroondah, it is essential that Councillors are briefed on a range of issues which come before Council for consideration.  As a means of providing this information, Assembly of Councillors briefings are conducted.

 

Assemblies are also attended by Council Officers, and sometimes other specific advisors, to provide Councillors with a detailed knowledge and understanding of issues under consideration to a level of detail that would inhibit timely decision-making, that would not be possible in an open Council meeting, where decision-making related debate is governed by strict meeting procedures.

 

The intent of this report is to present the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings, and to note the items discussed.  This information is already available to the public upon request in accordance with the Local Government Act [s.80A].

 

This report and attachments formally table the information items previously covered by Councillors.

 

The ‘Public Record’ of the Assembly of Councillors briefings held on 20 July and 3 August 2015 are attached for information.

 

The items contained therein were noted.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

Assembly of Councillors briefings are important forums for advice and discussion, on what are often complex issues facing the municipality, in the lead up to formal decisions being made by Councillors at Council Meetings.  At Assemblies, or outside them, Councillors also have the opportunity of requesting additional information to assist in the decision making process.

 

It is appropriate that the ‘Public Record’ of those Assembly of Councillors briefings which are attended by all Councillors and generally held on Monday evenings at the City Offices Ringwood, usually two weeks prior to the formal Council Meeting, be noted at a formal meeting of Council.

 

 

Attachments

1.

2015 July 20 - Assembly of Councillors - Public Record

2.

2015 August 03 - Assembly of Councillors - Public Record

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE PUBLIC RECORD OF THE ASSEMBLY OF COUNCILLORS BRIEFINGS HELD 20 july and 3 august 2015

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Councillor Representation Reports

Item 3

 

Purpose

To receive and note the following meeting minutes and to provide an opportunity for Council’s representative to provide a further verbal report.

·        Maroondah Business Advisory Committee Meeting held 22 June 2015

·        Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee Minutes held 23 July 2015

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2013-2017 (Year 3: 2015-2016) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

 

Our Vision:  Maroondah is an effectively empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that ensure their voice is heard and considered.  Council provides strong and responsive leadership, ensures transparent processes and works with the community to advocate and champion their needs

Key Directions 2014 – 2015:

8.1     Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable.

Background

As part of Council's commitment to the principles and practice of good governance, it is appropriate that Councillors and the Community are formally updated on the actions and activities of the various organisations bodies/advisory groups upon which it is represented.

Issue / discussion

Council is represented on numerous Boards and Organisations. Appointments are made annually by Council at the commencement of the new Mayoral term in November.

 

Crs Lamont, Lowe and Willmott are Council’s representatives on the Maroondah Business Advisory Committee.

 

Crs Fitzgerald and Lamont are Council’s representatives on the Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee, with Cr Thomas as a substitute representative.

Financial / economic issues

Not Applicable

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

 

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

It is appropriate that Councillors and the Community are formally updated on the actions and activities of the various organisations bodies/advisory groups upon which Council is represented.

 

 

Attachments

1.

2015 June 22 - MBAC Minutes

2.

2015 July 23 - Minutes - Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES:

1.       minutes of the Maroondah Business Advisory Committee held 22 June 2015

2.       Minutes of the Maroondah Disability Advisory Committee held 23 JuLY 2015

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Approval in Principle of 2014/2015 Annual Financial Report & Annual Performance Statement

Item 4

 

Purpose

To receive and consider the recommendation of the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee in relation to the Annual Financial Report, and the Annual Performance Statement for the year ended 30 June 2015 (termed collectively as ‘the Documents’), to give approval in principle to the Documents, to authorise two Councillors to sign the Forms of Certification for the Documents and to authorise the Principal Accounting Officer to make non-significant changes to the Documents prior to certification.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in the Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2013-2017 (Year 2: 2014-2015) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area: A well governed and empowered community.

 

Vision Statement: In 2040, Maroondah will be an empowered community that is actively engaged in council decision making through processes that consider the needs and aspirations of all ages and population groups. Council will provide strong and responsive leadership, ensuring transparency, while working with the community to advocate for and ‘champion’ local needs.

 

Key Directions 2014-2015:

8.1       Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable.

Background

Approval in Principle

 

Section 132 (2) of the Local Government Act 1989 (the Act) provides that a Council must not submit its Annual Financial Report and Annual Performance Statement to the Auditor-General unless it has passed a resolution giving its approval in principle to that Report. The major element in the approval process adopted by Council is the consideration of the Documents by Council’s Audit & Risk Advisory Committee.

 

At its meeting on 18 August the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee conducted a review of the Documents. The Committee sought and received responses from both the Auditor-General’s contractor and Council’s Principal Accounting Officer in respect of the Documents and then resolved as follows:

 

The Audit & Risk Advisory Committee has received and noted the Financial Statements, and the Performance Report from management and the Closing Report to the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee from the External Auditor. The Audit & Risk Advisory Committee recommends that Council receives and adopts the Financial Statements and Performance Report for the year end 2014/2015, subject to the resolution of any outstanding items in Appendix A of the Closing Report to the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee in consultation with the Auditor-General, Victoria and the minor enhancements as suggested by the members of the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee.

Council officers will address the matters raised by the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee partly in consultation with the Auditor-General Victoria.

 

The timetable agreed with the Auditor-General in respect of the finalisation of the Documents and the production of the Annual Report requires the:

·                Submission of the ‘approved in principle’ Documents to the Auditor-General – by 28 August;

·                Notification to Council of any amendments of significance agreed with the Auditor-General – by 1 September;

·                The certification of the Documents (as amended if required) by two designated Councillors – by 2 September; and

·                Issue of the Auditor-General’s report on the Documents – by 11 September.

The approval in principle of the Documents as sought by the recommendation in this report is a crucial component in the path to achievement of these target dates. The Documents have been previously distributed to Councillors under separate cover.

 

Certification

 

Sections 132 (5) of the Act provides that Council must authorise two Councillors to certify the Documents in their final form after any changes recommended, or agreed to, by the Auditor-General have been made.

 

In addition to the certification by Councillors, the Local Government (Finance and Reporting) Regulations 2004 require that Annual Financial Report be certified by the Chief Executive Officer and the Principal Accounting Officer, and the Annual Performance Statement be certified by the Chief Executive Officer.

 

Treatment of Changes to the Approved Report

 

In the event that changes are required to be made to the Documents under Section 132 (5) of the Act, the Auditor-General has recommended that certifying officers:

·                Formally draw Council’s attention to significant changes prior to the certification of the Documents; and

·                Process non-significant changes without further formal approval.

Significant changes will cover amendments involving material movements to either the financial or performance results or status of Council, the statements of accounting policy and/or the manner of presentation of the Documents

 

Issue / discussion

Performance for 2014/15

 

The Financial Statements for 2014/15, which have been prepared based on the Australian equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards (AIFRS), disclose a surplus for the period of $16.603m. This compares with anticipated Adopted Budget surplus of $5.993m. Comments on the major reasons for this increase in performance against the budgeted surplus and other significant factors affecting Council’s financial position are provided below:

·                Capital Grants were $3,286k greater than budget and relates to capital grants that were received during the year but not budgeted for are:

-        Aquanation received $1,500k in the 2014/15 year but this was budgeted in the 2015/16 year

-        CCTV for Ringwood MAC $200k 

-        CCTV for East Ringwood $200k

-        Mullum Pavilion $360k Federal funding and $200k State funding

·                Grants operating. The Victorian Grants Commission first quarter payment for 2015/16 ($2,480k) has been paid in advance which will affect budgeting over the two financial years. Other items of a positive note is increased funding for Home and Community Care $460k and Maternal& Child Health of $62k.

·                Contributions - monetary A better than budget outcome of $3,282k was due predominantly to higher than planned receipts from Open Space Cash in Lieu contributions from developers ($2,139k). Council received a contribution from Yarra Ranges for joint work on Colchester Road.

·                The improved position for Other Income relates to interest on investments up by $393k, which was due to higher levels for investment and penalty interest on rates was better than budget by $69k.

·                Borrowings costs were below budget by $514k due to the budget being based on borrowing in July 2014 to partly fund the construction of Aquanation but the actual borrowing date was in November 2014.

·                Council during the year reduced our holdings of some infrastructure assets via a write off of some obsolete assets. Writing off of assets that were demolished during the financial year and relate to such items as Ainslie Park  reconstruction, East Ringwood Reserve new drainage, replacement of signage across municipality, writing off of road assets prior to a renewal of the surface including Allambanan Drive and Colchester Road.

 

·                Capital Expenditure for the year totalled $51.208m against a budget for the year of $41.211m. The variance relates mainly to timing differences for some major projects being Aquanation which was proceeding ahead of schedule and $2.1m of funds being brought forward from 2015/16 financial year. The Norwood Family and Children’s Centre also had funding ($1.22m) brought forward from 2015/16. There was carried forward capital works from 2013/14 for Mullum Reserve Pavilion $1.185m and Realm $1.324m.

·                Cash and Investment holdings (including Other Financial Assets) at 30 June 2015 amounted to $39.920m of which $15.925m related to restricted assets. The major items being the Public Open Space Contributions ($3.534m), security deposits and bonds held in trust ($3.751m), Waste Management ($3.194m) and unexpended grants and contributions held ($3.794m).

After allowing for the financial effect of the above movements and adjustments, Council has performed well in relation to actual achievements against its 2014/15 Adopted Budget. In addition, the levels of assets and liabilities as recorded in the Balance Sheet are substantially in line with the projections contained in Council’s Annual Budget and Long Term Financial Strategy.

 

Council’s overall financial status remains strong with a total net equity of $1.4110b, current assets of $48.160m, cash and investment assets (including Other Financial Assets) of $39.920m and a working capital ratio of 1.95:1.

 

The Auditor-General’s contractor (HLB Mann Judd Chartered Accountants) has reported to the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee that their audit procedures conducted to date have not identified in the Documents any items of a nature that should give rise to undue concern by Council.

 

Certification and Timetable

 

A major element of the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee’s responsibilities involves the scrutiny of the Documents and the provision of recommendations to Council in respect of their approval and certification. The Mayor Councillor Dib and Councillor Willmott are the Council appointees to the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee.

 

The Auditor-General’s Office has been advised of agreement to a timetable, a copy of which is attached.

Financial / economic issues

The audit, scrutiny and certification of the Documents are an integral part of overall financial stewardship and control. The results of that audit and scrutiny reveal that the financial status of Council as at 30 June 2015 is healthy and provides a solid foundation for the achievement of targets in its 2015/16 Budget.


Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

When subsequently published in Council’s Annual Report, the Annual Performance Statement will provide the community with details of a wide range of  service performance and financial performance measurements arising from the Local Government Performance Reporting Framework and which have been audited. Additional indicators within this framework are also included in Council’s Annual Report.

Community consultation

The Documents will form a major component of Council’s 2014/15 Annual Report.

 

Under Section 133 of the Act, Council must give public notice that:

·                The Annual Report has been prepared;

·                The report of the Auditor under Section 9 of the Audit Act 1994 has been received; and

·                These documents can be inspected at the Council Offices during normal working hours.

In accordance with the Section 133 and in due course, a public notice will be placed in ‘The Age’ newspaper and the local press and copies of the Annual Report will be made available for public inspection at all Council’s Service Centres and Libraries.

 

Section 134 of the Act provides that the Annual Report must be considered at a meeting of Council. The Act also stipulates that the meeting must be advertised, must be held within one month of submission of the Report to the Minister, and must be kept open to the public while the Report is discussed.

Conclusion

Council can duly consider the approval in principle and subsequent certification of the Documents with the knowledge that the Documents as tabled have been the subject of both audit by the Auditor-General’s contractor and also of detailed examination and scrutiny by Council’s Audit & Risk Advisory Committee.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Annual Financial Report Timetable Summary

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL

1.    APPROVES IN PRINCIPLE THE 2014/15 ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT AND ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 132(2) OF THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT 1989;

 

2.    AUTHORISES THE MAYOR COUNCILLOR DIB AND COUNCILLOR WILLMOTT AS AUDIT AND RISK ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBERS, TO SIGN THE CERTIFICATION OF THE 2014/15 ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT AND THE ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 132(5) OF THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT 1989; AND

 

3.    AUTHORISES MR ALAN GEOFFREY ELLIS AS PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING OFFICER TO MAKE, WITHOUT FURTHER FORMAL NOTIFICATION TO COUNCIL, NON-SIGNIFICANT CHANGES TO THE 2014/15 ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT AND ANNUAL PERFORMANCE STATEMENT WHICH HAVE PREVIOUSLY BEEN APPROVED IN PRINCIPLE BY COUNCIL IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 132(5) OF THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT 1989.

 

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Audit & Risk Advisory Committee Report

Item 5

 

Purpose

To report to Council on the outcomes of the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee Meeting held on 18 August 2015.

Strategic / policy issues

The Local Government Act 1989 prescribes that Council must establish an Audit & Risk Advisory Committee and that such committee will be advisory in nature. The Audit & Risk Advisory Committee provides a mechanism for Council to strategically examine various aspects of the Council operations to ensure risk management, legal compliance, financial control and governance measures are in place.

Background

Council’s Audit & Risk Advisory Committee consists of both Council and external representatives. The Mayor Tony Dib, and Councillor, Les Willmott are Council representatives on the Committee.

 

The external members are Dr John Purcell (chair), Mr Hugh Parkes and Mr Bruce Potgieter.

 

The Audit & Risk Advisory Committee Charter requires that this Committee report to Council on the findings and recommendations from its meetings. This report provides a summary of matters under consideration by the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee of the meeting held on Tuesday 18 August 2015.

Issue / discussion

The Audit & Risk Advisory Committee refers the following items to Council for information.

 

Annual Financial Report and Annual Performance Statement for the Year Ended 30 June 2015

 

The Annual Financial Report and Annual Performance Statement for the Year Ended 30 June 2015, were presented for the consideration and approval in principle of the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee. An overview of the Statements was provided and answers given to a number of queries. The Committee resolved unanimously as follows:

 

The Audit & Risk Advisory Committee has received and noted the Financial Statements and the Performance Report from management and the Closing Report for the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee from the External Auditor.

 

The Audit & Risk Advisory Committee unanimously recommends to Council to accept the 2015 financial statements comprising the Comprehensive Income Statement, Balance Sheet, Changes in Equity, Statement of Cash Flows, Statement of Capital Works and the Performance Statement subject to any minor variations in presentation or immaterial amounts as determined by the Auditor-General, Victoria and agreed to by management between the date of approval by the Council and the acceptance by the Auditor-General, Victoria.

 

The Committee determined to advise Council that, following detailed examination and scrutiny of the Statements by the Committee, it approved in principle the report. This item was listed separately on the 24 August Council Notice Paper.

FINANCIAL / ECONOMIC ISSUES

Council’s budget provides for the operation of the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee and for the completion of an Internal Audit Program.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Not Applicable

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

This report provides a summary of the outcomes of the Audit & Risk Advisory Committee meeting held on Tuesday 18 August 2015.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

THAT COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE REPORT FROM THE AUDIT & RISK ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING HELD ON TUESDAY 18 AUGUST 2015.

 


DIRECTOR Corporate Services Marianne Di Giallonardo

 

Local Government Rate Capping and Variation Framework Review

Item 6

 

Purpose

To update Council on the recently released Essential Services Commission (ESC) ‘A Blueprint for Change Draft Report Vol I and II’.  Full copies of the material is available on their website (www.esc.vic.gov.au/local-government/Local-Government-Rates-Capping-Framework-Review).

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2013-2017 (Year 3: 2015-2016) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community.

Our Vision:  Maroondah will be a vibrant and diverse city with a healthy and active community, living in green leafy neighbourhoods, which are connected to thriving and accessible activity centres contributing to a prosperous economy within a safe, inclusive and sustainable environment.

Key Directions 2013 – 2017:  Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable.

Background

At Council’s May 2015 meeting a report outlining Council’s submission to the ESC’s April 2015 consultation paper on this matter was adopted by Council.  Since that time the ESC has consulted widely with the sector, including:

·        Councils through one-on-one meetings and various broader sector forums;

·        ratepayer associations and individual ratepayers, including a forum with ratepayer associations;

·        peak bodies in the local government sector such as MAV, VLGA, LGPro and FinPro;

·        unions, private sector representatives and other peak bodies with an interest in local government; and

·        with their colleagues in New South Wales at the Office of Local Government, the Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal, and a few NSW Councils.

The next step in the consultation process is:

·        consultation and information sessions during August 2015, including key stakeholder groups such as MAV, VLGA, LGPro, FinPro, Unions, Ratepayers Associations

·        close of submission to draft report – 28 August 2015

·        final report to the Ministers Local Government and Finance – end September 2015 and

·        final report Public Release – October 2015

Issue / discussion

There are three key components to the Draft Framework

 

i.          The Cap

The maximum annual rate of increase that councils can apply to their rates revenue.

ii.         The Variation

A mechanism for councils to seek (and have considered) increases in rates revenue above the rate cap.

iii.        Monitoring and Public Reporting

A means for verifying and reporting on compliance with the cap or variation conditions and providing accurate and reliable information about overall outcomes for ratepayers and communities under the framework.

The monitoring and reporting also help identify unusual or unexplained outcomes that need to be addressed.

i.        The Cap

          Specifically the Draft Framework outlines:

·                One cap applies equally to all Councils in Victoria

·                Revenue from general rates and municipal charges only should be included in the rate cap

·                Revenue from special charges e.g. waste charges, ‘revenue in lieu of rates’ and fire services levy should not be included

·                Service rates and charges e.g. waste charges should not be included, but be monitored and benchmarked

·                The Cap should be applied to the rates and charges paid by an average ratepayer

·                Supplementary rates should be excluded from the cap in the year they occur

It applies CPI annually at 60% of CPI plus 40% of the Wages Price Index based on the State Government’s Treasury Forecasts less an efficiency factor.

This is indicatively represented on the following table.

In the Draft Report, however, they do not provide a rationale for the Efficiency Factor or how it is derived.  It assumes Councils currently do not undertake efficiency measures and activities as part of their Long Term Financial planning and Annual Budget processes and hence, further information on this assumption would be useful, as would a worked example of the application to the “Average” rate payer.

 

ii.       The Variation Process

          The Draft Report outlines that:

·                The variation process is the most efficient option for dealing with individual Council circumstances given the vast diversity between Councils.

·                There are no pre-set thresholds proposed for Councils seeking a variation as they wish to maintain Council autonomy and for the same reason there are no pre-set thresholds proposed for Commission rejecting a variation.

They recognise Councils already have four broad options when considering budget pressures such as:

·                Review options to deliver outcomes more efficiently;

·                Ensure that services align with community’s highest priorities;

·                Examine possibilities/merits of alternative funding or financing options; and

·                Increase rates

Maroondah actively undertakes all these options plus more when developing its Long Term Financial Strategy and Annual Budget process. According to the ESC the five matters that must be addressed in each variation application include:

·                The Reasons for the rate increase greater than the cap;

·                That applications take account of ratepayers’ and communities views (Four principles above);

·                That the variation represents good value for money and is an efficient response to the budgetary need;

·                That service priorities and funding options have been considered; and

·                That the proposal is integrated into the Council’s long term strategy.

Maroondah already considers these matters in its financial planning considerations.  The Draft Report has provided guidance on how Councils are expected to address the above five subject matter areas are as follows:

·                Does Council require a variation and if so, the proposed form of variation?

·                What actions should Council take when they develop a variation application?

·                What evidence should Councils provide to support their variation applications?

The Draft Report further identifies ratepayer and community engagement principles as follows:

·                Clear, accessible and comprehensive information and timely process;

·                Ongoing and tailored to community needs;

·                Prioritised to matters of significance and impact; and

·                Leading to communities becoming more informed about decision-making.

According to the Commission the ESC should be responsible for assessing and determining the response to all applications and the role of the Commission is only to accept or reject applications.  At this point in time the Commission is still determining what these aspects actually mean in practice.

The proposed maximum length of variations are as follows:

First year of variation

Length of permissible variation

2016‑17

One year (i.e. 2016‑17 only)

2017‑18

Up to two years (i.e. 2017‑18 only or 2017‑18 and 2018‑19)

2018‑19

Up to three years (i.e. up to 30 June 2021)

2019-20 and beyond

Up to four years (i.e. up to 30 June 2023)

         

In seeking to keep the variation process simple, the practical application on how it will be

 administered requires further clarification so the Community, Councils and the ESC are

clear on how and when to undertake the process, and hence this further clarification is

 sought in Maroondah’s submission.

 

 

iii.      Monitoring and Public Reporting

The ESC are proposing to monitor (and report) that:

·                Council rates and charges are set in accordance with the rate cap; and

·                Where a variation has been approved, Councils rates and charges are set in accordance with the conditions of that approval.

They will also publicly monitor and report on outcomes for Councils’ service delivery, asset management and financial performance.

From time to time, the Commission may issue one-off reports into matters pertaining to the operation of the framework.

The ESC will also undertake longer term consideration of the Draft Framework Implementation are seen as a review of the framework in four years to ensure no unintended consequences and that it is delivering on the State Government’s intentions, meets sectoral accounts, provide guidance on financing options for local authorities and further assess cost reflectivity in certain rates and charges.

Again the details of what these aspects look like in reality require further clarification.

The application of the rate cap, variation process, and the monitoring and public reporting proposed Implementation Timelines for 2015-17 Rating Year are as follows:

 

Proposed Timelines for 2016-17 Rating Year

ESC announces 2016-17 cap

December 2015

All Councils submit baseline date (actuals)

January 2016

Councils notify ESC of intention to seek a variation

January 2016

Council applies for variation, submits baseline data (budget)

March 2016

ESC assesses Council variation applications

March-May 2016

ESC notifies Councils of decision

May 2016

Councils consult on draft budget

May 2016

Councils adopt budget

June 2016

 

Again, the details regarding what the ESC expect and the form of the information requires further clarification.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Commission has broadly supported Council’s May submission in relation to the Framework.  Further clarification on five points is proposed in Maroondah’s further submission.

 

1.       Cost of implementation and what funding is available from State Government to undertake aspects of the proposed framework which are currently not undertaken by Councils.

2.       Keep it simple – ensure the variation process is easily understood.

          3.       Clarification of the mechanics in application of the cap to the average rate with the          inclusion of a worked example.

4.       Efficiency factor argument justification.  How and why were the 5% in 17/18 and 10% in 18/19 chosen?

5.       Penalties for non-compliance.  Are there any penalties and if so, what is proposed?

Financial / economic issues

It is imperative that Council continue to maintain its longstanding prudent financial management of Council’s services to meet the needs and expectations of the Maroondah Community.  Council has been actively managing the financial resources on behalf of the Community diligently over the years in a way which aligns to the intent of the Draft Report.

Environmental / amenity issues

Resourcing services for the Maroondah Community in line with the Maroondah 2040 consultation and subsequent document to meet ongoing and future environmental and amenity needs and expectations is imperative.  The State Government needs to ensure the Rates Capping and Variation Framework provides the opportunity for this to be delivered.

Social / community issues

Similarly, resourcing services for the Maroondah Community to meet ongoing and future social and community needs and expectations is imperative.  The State Government needs to ensure the Rates Capping and Variation Framework provides the opportunity for this to be delivered.

Community consultation

Council is already acutely aware of the Maroondah Community’s needs and expectations and is ever vigilant in seeking to realise and deliver on these.

Conclusion

It is pleasing to see the Essential Services Commission has supported the majority of matters raised in Council’s May 2015 submission.  It is prudent that Council restates a number of the key elements such as, keep it simple, provide a working example regarding the application of the Framework to the average ratepayer, provide further background and justification for the efficiency factor, model the cost of implementation and outline possible penalties for those Councils who do not comply.

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

that council provides a further submission to the essential services commission that restates council’s position to keep it simple, provide a working example regarding the application of the framework to the average ratepayer, provide further background and justification for the efficiency factor, model the cost of implementation and outline possible penalties for those Councils who do not comply.

  


ACTING DIRECTOR Operations, Infrastructure & Leisure   ANDREW TAYLOR

 

Petition - Churchill Street, Ringwood
Request for Parking Restriction Modification

Item 1

 

Purpose

The purpose of this report is to provide an update on an investigation by Council Officers into the modification of the ‘No Stopping, 7am – 9pm’ parking restrictions on the western side of Churchill Street, Ringwood between Bond Street and Bourke Street to be applicable at all times.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2013-2017 (Year 2: 2014-2015) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  An accessible and connected community.

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah is an accessible community for all ages and abilities with walkable neighbourhoods, effective on and off-road transport networks, and access to a range of sustainable transport options.

Key Directions 2014 – 2015:

Work in partnership to provide improved accessibility and safety for transport users across all modes.

Background

Council received a petition on 9 June 2015.  The petition dated 12 December 2014, with an accompanying letter dated 5 June 2015, contained 6 signatures from residents in Churchill Street, Ringwood.

 

The prayer of the petition is as follows:

 

“PETITION:

 

NO PARKING ZONE TO WESTERN SIDE OF CHURCHILL STREET, RINGWOOD – BETWEEN BOND STREET AND BOURKE STREET”

 

This petition was tabled at Council on 22 June 2015 and the following recommendations were adopted:

 

THAT

 

1.       COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THE PETITION CONTAINING 6 SIGNATURES REQUESTING the modification of the ‘No Stopping, 7am – 9pm’ parking restrictions on the western side of churchill street between bond street and bourke street to be applicable at all times

2.       OFFICERS PREPARE A REPORT ON THE MATTERS RAISED IN THE PETITION FOR CONSIDERATION AT A FUTURE MEETING OF COUNCIL

3.       THE LEAD PETITIONER IS ADVISED ACCORDINGLY

Churchill Street is located within the North West Residential Precinct of the Ringwood Metropolitan Activity Centre, and runs between Bond Street and Nelson Street.

 

Parking within the North West Residential Precinct is generally limited to 2 hours, as shown in Figure 1 below, in accordance with the principles of Ringwood CAD Parking Strategy (2009) endorsed by Council in October 2009.  Eligible residents are entitled to parking permits for exemption to the parking restrictions in accordance with the Ringwood Central Activities District Parking Permit Policy endorsed by Council in November 2010.

 

RCAD Parking Proposed Restrictions

Figure 1 – North West Residential Precinct Parking Restrictions (2011)

 

Churchill Street is classified as a Local Access Street, in accordance with Council’s Road Management Plan, and provides direct access for approximately 49 residential properties and 2 commercial properties.

 

Figure 2 on the following page, shows an aerial view of Churchill Street and the surrounding area.

 

Figure 2 – Aerial view of Churchill Street and surrounding area

 

Churchill Street has a default speed limit of 50km/hr and a suitable carriageway width of approximately 7.2 metres to allow parking on both sides of the road while providing one lane of through traffic.

 

Kerbside parking for a maximum 2 hours is permitted on both sides of the street, in accordance with the above, however it is noted that time based No Stopping restrictions apply to the western side of Churchill Street between Bourke Street and Bond Street.

Issue / discussion

In accordance with the recommendations of the Council report dated 22 June 2015, Council’s Engineers undertook a detailed investigation of parking within Churchill Street between Bourke Street and Bond Street, to ascertain the level of on-street parking occurring and examine the traffic flow through the street.

 

Throughout various site visits it was noted that during the day the two hour zone was generally fully occupied by a mix of residents, visitors and patrons to nearby trading stores, while the No Stopping area was free from illegally parked vehicles, as shown in Figure 3 below. Furthermore a night time inspection found that the street was free from any parked vehicles, even though at this time (9:30pm) parking is permitted on both sides of the road, as shown in Figure 4 below.

Figure 3 – Churchill Street, Ringwood day time site inspection 26/6/15 - 10:00am

20150723_213141

Figure 4 – Churchill Street, Ringwood night time site inspection 23/7/15 - 9:30pm

 

The information above would suggest that during the day time vehicles are generally complying with the applicable times of the No Stopping restrictions (7am – 9pm) and only parking on the east side of the road, whereby two way traffic flow is maintained.

 

Although Council’s Engineers did not witness any illegal parking occurring within the street, it is acknowledged that there is potential for misinterpretation of the applicable times, which could result in illegal parking and would reduce traffic flow to one lane.

Noting the low demand for parking during the night in Churchill Street, Council’s Engineers consider that modifying the No Stopping restriction to be applicable at all times would not have a significant impact on residential parking.

 

Resident surveys were also undertaken to determine the level of support for the modification of part time No Stopping parking restrictions on west side of Churchill Street to be applicable at all times.  The existing and proposed parking restrictions can be seen below in Figure 5.

 

Churchill Street - Restriction Change

Figure 5 – Current vs Proposed parking restriction in Churchill Street, Ringwood

 

A total of twenty (20) surveys were issued to residents in Churchill Street that would be directly affected by the proposed modification to the parking restrictions.  The survey area consisted of all properties that have a direct frontage to Churchill Street between Bond Street and Bourke Street as shown in Figure 6 below.

               Survey Area

Figure 6 –Churchill Street, Ringwood Survey Area

 

There were five (5) surveys returned corresponding to an overall 25% response rate.  Of the returned surveys:

·        80% of residents supported the modification of part time No Stopping parking restrictions on west side of Churchill Street to be applicable at all times

·        20% of residents opposed the modification of part time No Stopping parking restrictions on west side of Churchill Street to be applicable at all times

It is considered that the lower response rate was influenced by the high number of properties in the survey area that are not owner occupied, i.e. rental properties with tenants.  It is considered that tenants are less likely to respond to traffic and parking surveys of this nature.  This was evident with 5 Churchill Street which contains eleven (11) apartments (equating to 55% of total properties surveyed), of which ten (10) are non-owner occupied based on property information records.  It is noted that only one (1) response was received from the apartment complex at 5 Churchill Street.  Accordingly when considering the request greater weight was provided to the survey responses received and the petition signatories rather than the overall response rate.  It is also noted that two of the original petition signatories that were included in the survey area did not return the survey.

As such, given the level of support indicated by the resident surveys returned and the signed petition it is proposed that the part time No Stopping parking restrictions on west side of Churchill Street be modified to be applicable at all times.  It is considered that the proposed modification will reduce misinterpretation of the restriction and improve traffic safety in the area.

Council’s Engineers will also organise for Local Laws Officers to undertake additional patrols in Churchill Street, Ringwood following the installation of the new parking restrictions.

Financial / economic issues

The replacement of parking restriction signage in Churchill Street will be funded from Council’s existing operational budget.

Environmental / amenity issues

The proposed parking signage restriction changes in Churchill Street would reduce traffic congestion, improve resident ingress and egress and also improve traffic safety in the area.

Social / community issues

Residents in Churchill Street, between Bond Street and Bourke Street have indicated that they are concerned with illegal parking on the west side of Churchill Street.  It is considered that the proposed parking restriction changes will better clarify that parking on the west side of Churchill Street is not permitted, improve access to residential properties and improve the overall traffic safety in the area.

Community consultation

As previously detailed, twenty (20) surveys were issued to residents in Churchill Street, who would be directly affected by the proposed modification to the parking restrictions, to determine the level of support.

Conclusion

In conclusion, given the level of support indicated by the resident surveys and the signed petition, it is recommended that the part time No Stopping parking restrictions on west side of Churchill Street between Bond Street and Bourke Street be modified to be applicable at all times.

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 


 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That

1.       council having considered the petition resolves to modify the “No Stopping, 7am – 9pm” parking restrictions on the western side of churchill street RINGWOOD between bond street and bourke street to be “No Stopping” applicable at all times

2.       THE LEAD PETITIONER BE ADVISED ACCORDINGLY

 


ACTING DIRECTOR Operations, Infrastructure & Leisure   ANDREW TAYLOR

 

2015/2016 Community Grants Funding Program

Item 2

 

Purpose

To seek Council endorsement for the allocation of financial assistance, through the Community Grants Funding Program to nominated community organisations for the 2015/2016 financial year.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2013-2017 (Year 3: 2015-2016) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Areas: 

·                A safe, healthy and active community

·                A prosperous and learning community

·                A vibrant and culturally rich community

·                An inclusive and diverse community

Our Vision:

·        Maroondah is a safe, healthy and active community with local opportunities provided for people of all ages and abilities to have high levels of social, emotional and physical wellbeing.

·        Maroondah is a creative cosmopolitan community recognised for its celebration and promotion of arts and culture. There are a broad range of engaging entertainment options, diverse cultural activities and the creation and display of traditional and contemporary forms of art.

·        Maroondah is an inclusive community where social connections are strong across generations and diversity is embraced and celebrated.

Key Directions 2013-2017

1.21   Support and empower local community groups, sporting clubs and special interest groups across Maroondah.

2.20   Encourage lifelong learning opportunities that support mature age and retired people to participate in the workforce, learn new skills and build community connections.

3.3     Support festivals and events that celebrate local arts, diversity and produce.  

7.10   Promote and create opportunities for community connectedness, learning, mentoring and social interactions for people from all life-stages and cultural backgrounds


Background

Council’s Community Grants Program opened for applications from Tuesday 14 April 2015, closing on Friday 5 June 2015.  Council received 72 applications with a total request of $206,637.00. The Community Grants Program consists of two funding schemes (Community Grants Scheme and the Arts and Cultural Grants Scheme) each with its own funding pool.

 

Council Officers from Sport and Recreation, Arts and Cultural Development, Youth Services, Aged and Disability Services, Children’s Services and Community Planning and Development individually reviewed and rated all applications according to the criteria listed below.  Recommendations were formulated and forwarded for discussion at an Assembly of Councillors held on Monday 3 August 2015.

 

The Assessment Criteria for the Grants is as follows:

 

COMMUNITY BUILDING

Projects which increase community participation, encourage volunteering, provide leadership opportunities and increase learning and skill development.

 

COMMUNITY BENEFIT

New initiatives or the expansion of an existing service that will address a clearly identified community need and contribute to improved community wellbeing.

 

COMMUNITY SUPPORT

Funding for community groups that provide help, advice or support to a specific population group that share a common experience.  The common experience could be anything from personally experiencing a similar issue or life situation (e.g. addiction, depression, rare condition/syndrome, disability, relationship, and loss/grief).

 

CLEARLY DEFINED ARTS & CULTURAL CONTENT

(Arts and Cultural Grant applications only)

Projects which generate community participation in arts and cultural activities, build local community networks and strengthen the identity and profile of the arts in Maroondah.

 

Issue / discussion

The Community Grants Scheme applications were divided into, and assessed under the following 8 categories:

·        Aged and Disability

·        Heritage, Environment & Community Arts

·        Children

·        Community Projects

·        Community Support

·        Emergency Relief

·        Physical Activity

·        Youth

All successful applicants for the 2015/2016 Community Grants Funding Program will be required to enter into a funding and service agreement with Council.  The agreements detail specific responsibilities, obligations and any identified reciprocal arrangements.

Financial / economic issues

The budget available for the 2015/2016 Community Grants Funding Program is:

Community Grants Scheme: $87,330 and Arts and Cultural Grants Scheme: $20,213.00.

The total value of recommendations endorsed is $104,673.00, providing funding to 56 community organisations. $2,870 of the Community Grants Funding Pool was reallocated to an in camera resolution passed by Council on Monday 20 July 2015. The remaining amount required for this resolution of $4,130 will be sourced from an alternative budget line.

 

An additional $7,000 in recurrent Community Grant funding was allocated in 2013/2014 to four organisations for four years. Those four organisations are:

·        Donwood Aged Care Auxiliary

·        Ringwood Eisteddfod

·        Ringwood Professional Athletic Club

·        Ringwood Spiders All Abilities Sports Club

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

Financial assistance provided by Council through the Community Grants Funding Program will facilitate an increase in the availability and range of services, facilities and programs throughout the municipality.  A significant proportion of the funding pool has been allocated to emergency relief and programs targeting the CALD community.

Community consultation

The Community Grants Funding Program was promoted through a Public Notice placed in the Maroondah Leader newspaper, an extensive mail-out to previous recipients and through Council’s website.  Applicants were encouraged to attend a Grants Writing Workshop held on Thursday 7 May 2015 at Maroondah Federation Estate.  Applicants also had the opportunity to schedule an individual appointment with Council Officers to seek advice relevant to their particular organisation and request.

 

Conclusion

The applications recommended for funding are detailed in Attachment 1.

 

All applicants will be informed in writing of the outcome of their grant submission.  Wherever possible, alternative funding options and other forms of assistance will be provided to unsuccessful organisations.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Administration - Community Grants 2015/216 - Council Report Table

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

rECOMMENDATION

 

That COUNCIL

1.       APPROVES THE RECOMMENDED SUBMISSIONS (AS OUTLINED IN THE SCHEDULE ATTACHED TO THIS REPORT) FOR FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE THROUGH THE COMMUNITY GRANTS FUNDING PROGRAM, TOTALLING $104,673.00

2.       APPROVES 56 GRANTS BASED ON ONE-YEAR FUNDING AND SERVICE AGREEMENTS

3.       ADVISES ALL ORGANISATIONS OF THE OUTCOME OF THEIR GRANT SUBMISSION

 


ACTING DIRECTOR Operations, Infrastructure & Leisure   ANDREW TAYLOR

 

Community Assistance Fund

Item 3

 

Purpose

To provide Council with a summary of the Community Assistance Fund for the six month period 1 January 2015 – 30 June 2015.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in the Maroondah 2040:  Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2013-2017 (Year 3: 2015-2016) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report:

 

Outcome Area:  Safe, healthy and active community

 

Vision Statement:  In 2040 Maroondah will be a safe, healthy and active community with local opportunities provided for people of all ages and abilities to have high levels of social emotional and physical wellbeing.

 

Key Directions 2013 - 2017

 

1.21 Support and empower local community groups, sporting clubs and special interest groups across Maroondah.

Background

The Community Assistance Fund provides financial support, being 20% of costs to a maximum value of $250, to assist individuals to meet new challenges and strive to exceed excellence in their chosen sport, profession or arts interest.

 

The Community Assistance Fund also aims to provide financial assistance to not for profit local community groups, to a maximum of $1,000 to assist in meeting unexpected expenses which are unable to be deferred to Council’s Community Grants Scheme for consideration.

 

The Community Assistance Fund also provides for in-kind support to assist community organisations to meet costs associated with participation in community activities such as fund raising and charity days.

 

All grant applications are assessed according to set criteria and funding recommendations based on a funding matrix and approved at monthly Assembly of Councillors meetings.

 

The Community Assistance Fund is the only scheme available offering funding opportunities for individual Maroondah residents.

Issue / discussion

During the funding period 1 January 2015 – 30 June 2015, 11 individual applications and 1 organisation application received funding and 2 in-kind applications were approved.

 

Community Assistance Fund applications have been received from a range of ages and disciplines which demonstrates diversity of interests in Maroondah and the high level of achievement being reached in the Maroondah community.


The following is a summary of successful Community Assistance Fund applicants for the period 1 January to 30 June 2015.

 

Individuals:

Resident of:

Purpose of Funding

Warranwood

Selected in team competing at the National Cheerleaders Association All Star National Championships held in USA

Croydon Hills

Selected in team competing at the National Cheerleaders Association All Star National Championships held in USA

Croydon North

Selected in Victorian team competing at the 2015 Basketball Australian Junior Championships held in Ballarat

Warranwood

Selected to compete at the Australian Junior League Baseball Championships held in Queensland

Croydon North

Selected to compete at the Australian Junior Basketball Championships held in Tasmania

Ringwood North

Selected to compete at the Australian Junior Basketball Championships held in Tasmania

Heathmont

Selected as a member of the 2015 Australian Women’s Volleyball Team to represent Australia at the Asian Championships in China and the FIVB Grand Prix in Kazakhstan, Algeria and Australia

Bayswater North

Selected to compete at the Australian Gymnastics Championships held in Melbourne

Croydon

Selected to attend and represent Australia at the London International Youth Science Forum held in London

Warranwood

Selected to compete at the National Little League Baseball Championships held in NSW

Warranwood

Selected to compete at the National Little League Baseball Championships held in NSW

 

Organisations:

Organisation

Purpose of Funding

$ Value

Maroondah Brass

ANZAC Centenary Concert

$453

 

In-Kind:

Organisation

Activity Description

In-Kind Support

$ Value

Rotary Club of Croydon Inc.

Charity Golf Day

Use of Dorset Golf Course

$5,000

Rotary Club of Ringwood Inc.

Charity Golf Day

Use of Dorset Golf Course

$5,000

 

During the 2014/2015 Financial Year, 30 Individual and 4 group applications received funding and 4 In-Kind applications were approved.

Financial / economic issues

The budget for the 2014/2015 Community Assistance Fund was set at $21,408 with $3,157
expended for the 6 month period 1 January 2015 to 30 June 2015 for individuals and organisations.

 

The In-Kind value for period 1 January 2015 to 30 June 2015 is $10,000. 

 

The total expenditure for the 12 month period 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2015 was $18,593.60

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

The Community Assistance Fund has been developed to provide a financial contribution to assist community groups with urgent or unforeseen costs and to assist individuals to meet costs associated with participation in community activities such as sporting competitions, self development initiatives or arts interests.  The in-kind component is to assist community organisations meet costs associated with participation in community activities such as fund raising, charity days etc.

Community consultation

Not Applicable

Conclusion

The report provides details to Council pertaining to the Community Assistance Fund Grant scheme 1 January 2015 – 30 June 2015 and provides a list of individuals and organisations who received financial support through this funding program. 

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

THAT COUNCIL RECEIVES AND NOTES THIS REPORT

 


ACTING DIRECTOR Operations, Infrastructure & Leisure   ANDREW TAYLOR

 

Community Facilities Lease Agreement for Norwood Sporting Club Pty Ltd

Item 4

 

Purpose

To seek Council approval of a lease agreement between Maroondah City Council and Norwood Sporting Club Pty Ltd and to authorise the signing and sealing of the relevant documentation subject to undertaking the administrative procedures under Section 223 of the Local Government Act.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in the Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2013-2017 (Year 3: 2015-2016) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose in this report:

 

Outcome Area: Safe, healthy and active community

 

Our Vision: In 2040 Maroondah will be a safe, healthy and active community with local opportunities provided for people of all ages and abilities to have high levels of social, emotional and physical wellbeing.

 

Key Directions 2015 – 2016

 

1.21 Support and empower local community groups, sporting clubs and special interest groups across Maroondah

Background

In 2013/2014 Council received significant State and Federal funding to redevelop the Kevin Pratt Pavilion, Mullum Reserve, Ringwood. This pavilion, which is due for completion in October 2015, will be the premises for the Norwood Sporting Club which consists of Norwood Cricket Club, Norwood Football Club, Norwood Netball Club and Norwood Golf Club. The facility will also accommodate the Ringwood U3A on an annual hire agreement.

 

Lease negotiations commenced in May 2015, and the tenant is now ready to progress to endorsement of the lease.

Issue / discussion

Council seeks to enter into a Community Facilities Lease Agreement with the Norwood Sporting Club Pty Ltd.

 

By Lease Agreements made between Council and the Lessee, the Lessee will be granted use and occupation of the premises for a term of ten (10) years with an option for a further five (5) years at annual rentals calculated in accordance with the principles of the Community Facilities Pricing Policy and determined under the category of Other Community Groups Occupying Council-Owned Facilities.

 

 

 

If lease agreements for ten (10) years or more are requested, then in accordance with Section 190 of the Local Government Act 1989, Council is required to publish a Public Notice for at least four (4) weeks and to allow for public submissions under Section 223 on the proposed lease.

 

Pending public submissions Officers recommend that Council approves the Lease Agreement upon the terms and conditions as set out in the Lease, the principal terms of which are:

·        Term – Ten (10) years with the option for a further term of five (5) years.

·        Maintenance – in accordance with the Community Facilities Standard Maintenance Schedule.

·        Public Liability insurance of $20M and glass replacement insurance.

Financial / economic issues

Council’s Community Facilities Pricing Policy provides an overarching framework to guide Council and ensures a consistent and transparent approach to the pricing of facilities.  Under the category of Other Community Groups Occupying Council-Owned Facilities, the Policy outlines the factors to be considered when calculating the rental fee.

 

The rental is determined based on the quality of the facility, capital contributions provided by Council and the community organisation, the type of organisation using the facility and whether the organisation has exclusive use of the facility.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

The implementation of the standard Community Facilities Lease Agreement ensures the clear and equitable delineation of maintenance responsibilities for all tenants occupying Council owned and/or managed community facilities, consistent with the Community Facilities Pricing Policy, and supports a sustainable approach to the provision of community based sport and recreation.

Community consultation

In August 2014, surrounding residents were invited to attend a community consultation forum at the Kevin Pratt Pavilion to discuss the proposed redevelopment of the facility and possible implications associated with the works. Consultation and negotiation for the development of the Lease Agreement was undertaken between Council Officers and the executive committee.

 

The lease will be advertised in The Age in August, 2015 in accordance with Section 190 of the Local Government Act 1989 and submissions invited in accordance with Section 223.

 

Should submissions be received a Committee of Council will be convened to hear any person wishing to be heard in support of their submission. Council will also  consider all written submissions, and include a written report on the proceedings of any committee hearing conducted, following which it shall determine whether or not to enter into the Lease Agreements.

Conclusion

The Lease Agreements provide a mutually beneficial arrangement between Council and Norwood Sporting Club Pty Ltd for the continued use and management of the Kevin Pratt Pavilion. 

 

 

Attachments

Not Applicable

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That council

1.       IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 190 OF THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT 1989 “THE ACT” UNDERTAKEs THE STATUTORY PROCEDURES AND ADVERTSING TO ENTER INTO A TEN (10) YEAR LEASE WITH A five (5) YEAR OPTION WIth norwood sporting club Pty ltd.

2.       IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 223 OF THE ACT:

i.        APPOINTS A COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL CONSISTING OF CRS …………….., …………………. AND ……………….. TO HEAR ANY PERSON WISHING TO BE HEARD IN SUPPORT OF THEIR SUBMISSION, ON A DATE TO BE DETERMINED;

ii.       CONSIDERS ALL WRITTEN SUBMISSIONS, INCLUDING A WRITTEN REPORT ON THE PROCEEDINGS OF ANY COMMITTEE HEARING CONDUCTED, FOLLOWING WHICH IT SHALL DETERMINE WHETHER OR NOT TO ENTER INTO THE STATED LEASE AGREEMENTS AND;

iii.      authorises THE DIRECTOR OPERATIONS, INFRASTRUCTURE AND LEISURE TO UNDERTAKE THE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES NECESSARY TO ENABLE COUNCIL TO CARRY OUT ITS FUNCTIONS UNDER SECTION 223 OF THE ACT IN RELATION TO THIS MATTER

3.       RESOLVES THAT IF NO SUBMISSIONS ARE RECEIVED, TO GRANT THE LEASES AND PROCEED TO SIGN AND SEAL ALL DOCUMENTATION AS APPROPORIATE.


DIRECTOR Planning & Community Phil Turner

 

Active and Healthy Ageing Initiative - Towards an Age-friendly Maroondah 2015-2020

Item 1

 

Purpose

To present Council with the draft Active and Healthy Ageing Initiative – Towards an Age Friendly Maroondah, including the 2015-2020 Action Plan to pursue an Age Friendly Cities approach, and to seek Councils endorsement for it to be placed on public exhibition for community comment.

 

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2013-2017 (Year 3: 2015-2016) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  An inclusive and diverse community

Our Vision:  In the year 2040, Maroondah is an inclusive community where social connections are strong across generations and diversity is embraced and celebrated.

Key Directions 2013 – 2017:

7.8 Support all ages and population groups to be valued, connected, supported and empowered within their local community through the provision and coordination of accessible services, programming and facilities.

Background

An Age Friendly City is defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as an inclusive and accessible urban environment that promotes active ageing.  The Age Friendly initiative was created to make it easier for older people to age actively, to live in security, enjoy good health and continue to fully participate in society. According to the WHO Global Age Friendly Cities Framework there are 8 themes that influence the health and quality of older people in the community.  These are;

·        Outdoor Spaces and Buildings

·        Transportation

·        Housing

·        Social Participation

·        Respect and Social Inclusion

·        Civic Participation and Employment

·        Communication and Information

·        Community Support and Health

 

Local governments that plan and take action to accommodate the changing needs of older residents can ensure that their communities remain attractive places to live with features that not only benefit seniors but support the health, safety and participation of residents of all ages.

 

A core aspect of age friendly work is that it must include older people as active participants in the process. 

 

On 1 December 2014 Maroondah was accepted as a member of the World Health Organisation Global Network of Age Friendly Cities and Communities in recognition of Council’s commitment to becoming age friendly.

Issue / discussion

The Active and Healthy Ageing (AHA) Initiative has been developed as the tool to guide Maroondah’s journey to becoming an age friendly city.  The initiative aims to explore the 8 age friendly themes listed above and to identify priority areas for Maroondah through discussions with the community and with a particular focus on older people. 

Financial / economic issues

Council plays a key role in planning services for seniors, with a range of services directly provided by Council and others coordinated and supported by Council. Council is also responsible for providing and maintaining facilities from which seniors programs operate.

 

There are no additional direct financial costs incurred by Council through the implementation of this Initiative. The Initiative promotes increased community strengthening and capacity building to support the Maroondah community to respond to the needs of seniors through increased networking, relationship building and collaboration.  Where new initiatives and opportunities have been highlighted, there may be potential to source additional and new funding.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

By 2030 over one quarter of Australia’s population will be aged over 60. By 2020 over 40% of Maroondah’s population will be aged over 45 years.  Maroondah’s current population aged over 60 is higher than the metropolitan average and has the highest proportion of people aged over 85 in the Eastern Region.  The proportion of older people living alone and at increased risk of social isolation is increasing significantly.

 

Extensive community consultations with older people in Maroondah during the 2013 and 2014 Seniors Expo events, Maroondah Festival Cafe Consult, 2040 forums and through the AHA consultation process have indicated that seniors wish to continue to reside in the Maroondah community, remaining as independent as possible and living within their own homes. Older people want to age healthily, continue to learn and remain connected to family and friends.  They wish to be treated with respect and contribute to community life as they age.

Older people in Maroondah have identified that they are seeking opportunities to remain physically active and socially connected, to have a choice of accessible local services and businesses and to be able to access relevant and timely information.  Decreased mobility and confidence as people age requires that consideration is given to the accessibility, safety and security of outdoor spaces and buildings.

Community consultation

As part of Council’s unique approach to the community consultation and engagement process, community leaders, older residents, Council employees and Councillors were nominated to become part of Maroondah’s Age Friendly Champion program.  Discussions with older people in the Maroondah Community, lead by the Champion team, have informed Council’s AHA Initiative.  Council’s draft initiative has been endorsed in principle by COTA Victoria, the peak body for seniors and approved by the World Health Organisation with regards to adopting a framework which appropriately meets the Age Friendly Cities criteria and reflects true collaboration with, and involvement by seniors in determining Maroondah’s priority areas.

Conclusion

There is a growing commitment from Federal, State and Local Governments and Community Service Organisations to proactively plan for and prioritise actions which will meet the needs of Australia’s ageing population.  Maroondah’s AHA Initiative will drive age friendly concepts and actions to enable older people to continue to contribute significantly to their communities, their families, the economy and society.  Pending consideration of public comment, the Active and Healthy Ageing Initiative – Towards an Age Friendly Maroondah will be launched at the 2015 Seniors Week event to be held at Karralyka on Thursday 8th October 2015.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Draft AHA Initiative Contents

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

That council PLACES THE DRAFT active and healthy ageing initiative – towards an age friendly city 2015-2020, ON PUBLIC EXHIBITION FROM TUESDAY 25 AUGUST to FRIday 18 september 2015

 


DIRECTOR Planning & Community Phil Turner

 

Draft Maroondah Public Art Policy

Item 2

 

Purpose

The purpose of this report is to present Council with the results of the public display of the draft Maroondah Public Art Policy (including the 2015 – 17 Action Plan), and to seek Council’s endorsement of the Policy (See attached).

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2013-2017 (Year 3: 2015-2016) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  The development of the Maroondah Public Art Policy was identified as a Priority Action in the Council Plan 2014-15. Council’s development of this Policy also responds to strong community support for public art identified through community consultations for both Maroondah 2040 and the Maroondah Arts and Cultural Development Strategy (2014-18).

 

Outcome Area Three of Maroondah 2040 was identified as “A vibrant and culturally rich community”.

 

Our Community said:

 

We would like to see ... an increase in public art.”

 

“Neighbourhood centres need to be further activated to become vibrant destinations”.

Our Vision: 

In 2040, Maroondah will be a creative cosmopolitan community recognised for its celebration and promotion of arts and culture. There will be a broad range of engaging entertainment options, diverse cultural activities and the creation and display of traditional and contemporary forms of art.

Key Directions 2014 – 2015:

Encourage a range of temporary and permanent public art that celebrates the unique characteristics of Maroondah including our history, cultural diversity , environment and future aspirations.

Priority Actions 2014-2015:

Develop a public art policy.

Background

The Maroondah Public Art Policy (as attached) has been developed to protect Council’s public art assets, maximize public art outcomes for the community and create a sustainable framework for the actions required to achieve the community’s public art vision. The policy is based on industry and community research and incorporates best practice for local government in regard to public art programs.

As resolved by Council at it’s meeting on June 22, 2015, the draft policy was placed on public display for the period of 29 June to 13 July 2015. No public submissions were received as a result of the display of the draft policy.

Issue / discussion

Best Practice: The Policy establishes the framework for a formalized public art collection. Collection management protocols will ensure public artworks are maintained to an appropriate industry standard.  They will also establish best practice processes for the acquiring and dispersal of public artworks, engagement with the community in regard to public art programs and the promotion of the City’s public art collection.

 

Maximising Outcomes: The policy outlines principles and processes for Council to maximize the benefits of its own public art planning, commissioning and promotion and also builds on the recent success of the collaborative public art commission process at Ringwood Station, where the commission is funded by external bodies. It lays the groundwork for maximizing opportunities for public art in response to statutory planning triggers. It provides a framework to negotiate voluntary public art contributions from the private sector as well as potential mandated contributions leveraged through planning scheme mechanisms.

Financial / economic issues

This policy shall provide substantially improved protection for Council’s public art assets. Where costs are associated with a more active public art program they will be largely offset by the integration of public art commissioning processes in the early planning and design stages of capital projects.

 

There are no direct financial costs incurred by Council through the implementation of this Policy. The Policy promotes increased commissioning of public art by external developers and land managers. 

Environmental / amenity issues

The Public Art Policy will promote enhanced public spaces through the incorporation of public art as indicated by the community through Maroondah 2040.

Social / community issues

More engaging and vital public spaces, through the introduction of public art, will reinforce community connections and enhance people’s experience of their community

Community consultation

Significant community consultation informs the development of this Policy, particularly community consultations for Maroondah 2040 and the Arts and Culture in Maroondah Survey (2014).

 

During the development of the Policy, there has also been local arts practitioner input.

 

At its meeting of June 22, Council endorsed the draft policy for public display. The document was displayed from June 29 to July 13. No public submissions were received.

Conclusion

The development, management and promotion of Maroondah City Council’s public art contribute to the quality of public spaces and enhance community connection. The Public Art Policy is a direct response to the community’s vision as captured in Maroondah 2040, including the key theme of “a vibrant and culturally rich community”.

 

The Maroondah Public Art Policy ensures that public art assets are properly managed and maintained; that processes are in line with industry best practice; and that the City is well placed to respond to opportunities and deliver great public artworks for the people of Maroondah.

 

In accordance with Council’s recommendation that the draft Policy be publicly displayed, and in the absence of submissions as a result of the public display of the Policy, it is recommended that Council endorse the Public Art Policy (as attached). 

 

 

Attachments

1.

Draft Maroondah Public Art Policy Attachment

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

that COUNCIL, HAVING placed the draft maroondah public art POLICY on public exhibition from 29 june to 13 july, and there being no submissions received, hereby resolves to adopt the POLICY.

 


DIRECTOR Planning & Community Phil Turner

 

Draft Maroondah Community Engagement Policy

Item 3

 

Purpose

The purpose of this report is to present Council’s revised Community Engagement Policy 2015 for formal consideration and adoption following a six week period of public exhibition and feedback.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2013-2017 (Year 3: 2015-2016) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:  A well governed and empowered community

Our Vision:  In 2040, Maroondah will be an empowered community that is actively engaged in Council decision making through processes that consider the needs and aspirations of all ages and population groups. Council will provide strong and responsive leadership, ensuring transparency, while working with the community to advocate for and ‘champion’ local needs.

Key Directions 2013 – 2017:

8.1 Provide enhanced governance that is transparent, accessible, inclusive and accountable

8.3 Provide community inspired leadership in democratic governance

8.4 Foster a culture of innovation, cooperation, commitment, communication and continuous improvement that positions Maroondah City Council as a leader in local government

8.7 Ensure that all community members have access to, and are informed on, matters that affect them, including the provision of tailored information for under-represented and hard-to-reach groups

8.8 Undertake inclusive engagement and consultation using accessible and tailored approaches to consider the needs and aspirations of different age and population groups

8.9 Create opportunities for shared decision making through active community involvement

8.11 Foster a Council culture of collaboration and partnerships with individuals, community groups, businesses, service providers and other levels of government

8.13 Encourage individuals, groups and organisations to proactively connect with and contribute to their local community

8.14 Work in partnership to deliver services that recognise and are responsive to the interests and needs of the community

Priority Action 2015-2016:

Nil


Background

The Community Engagement Policy is a formal expression of Council’s commitment to engaging the Maroondah community through the use of appropriate, effective and inclusive practices.

 

Council is committed to engaging with its community in a meaningful, accountable, responsive and equitable way. This Policy outlines Council’s position, role and commitments to ensure community engagement is integrated into Council activities to support decision making, build relationships and strengthen communities. Often engagement processes support two or all three of these objectives.

 

The Policy also seeks to improve Council’s engagement processes and outcomes through encouraging a consistent approach and continual learning through evaluation, and through expanding the range of engagement methods used.

 

The most recent Policy was adopted by Council in October 2008. Whilst this policy has served Council well, with the completion of the Maroondah 2040 Community Vision it is now time for the Policy to be updated.

Issue / discussion

In developing this draft Policy, Council considered a broad range of community engagement policies from across a range of jurisdictions, particularly in Victoria but also from other Australian states, the United Kingdom and Canada.

 

Some of the objectives incorporated in this revised Policy include:

·        Broadening the definition of community engagement to reflect the breadth of related activities

·        Establishing a set of community engagement commitments based on the IAP2 values

·        Simplifying the language to ensure readability and understanding

·        Clarifying Council roles and responsibilities regarding community engagement

·        Acknowledging minimum legislative requirements

·        Encouraging a best practice approach to community engagement across all Council's activities

Key sections of the revised Policy include:

·        What is community engagement

·        Our commitment to the community

·        Why we engage

·        Who we engage

·        When we engage

·        How we engage

 

The Policy identifies that community engagement is the responsibility of all Council service areas, teams and employees. The Policy will be applied at the planning stage of any project or initiative, when a change in service, activities or infrastructure is considered, when an issue is raised and requires a decision and when more information or evidence is required.  Engagement is typically required at multiple stages within a project, program or development.

 

To ensure the effective application of engagement principles and processes, an accompanying Community Engagement Toolkit will be prepared in 2015/16 to provide guidance for Council employees.

Financial / economic issues

None

Environmental / amenity issues

None

Social / community issues

None

Community consultation

Council officers undertook an interactive engagement activity at five community events across Maroondah in January, February and March 2015 to ensure that community members were provided with an opportunity to provide input into development of the Policy. A total of 384 people from a wide range of age groups provided their thoughts on community engagement and shared their insights on how they would like Council to engage with them.

The results indicate that traditional engagement methods such as local media, publications and direct mail are still relevant but local community members are also keen to engage through Council events, email, online and social media.

Once an initial draft Policy was developed, feedback was sought from a broad range of Council staff across the organisation in March/April 2015 as part of a peer review panel. Every service area was provided with the opportunity to provide input on the draft Policy as part of this panel. Further internal engagement was also undertaken with a number of service areas to hypothetically ‘road-test’ the Policy including teams that are already heavily involved in community engagement and those teams with less experience. A range of applications across the organisation were considered such as strategy development, program/service changes, capacity building activities, capital works developments and developing community facilities.

 

The Draft Maroondah Community Engagement Policy was placed on public exhibition. Community feedback was encouraged over a six week period via Council’s website, social media, local libraries and customer service centres. A presentation on the Policy was also made to Council’s Disability Advisory Group on July 23, 2015 with positive feedback received.

Feedback from the three survey responses received during the public exhibition process highlighted that community members felt the Policy was comprehensive and supported its commitments. Respondents were particularly keen to see that this Policy is effectively implemented in the way that Council delivers its services, facilitates partnerships and advocates on behalf of its community. No formal written submissions were received.

Conclusion

Council is committed to engaging with its community in a meaningful, accountable, responsive and equitable way. This revised Community Engagement Policy 2015 outlines Council’s position, role and commitments to ensure community engagement is integrated into Council activities to support decision making, build relationships and strengthen communities. Following a six week period of public exhibition, the Policy is presented for formal Council consideration.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Draft Maroondah Community Engagement Policy 2015

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

 

That council, having placed the draft maroondah community engagement policy 2015 on public exhibition from 26 june to 7 august 2015, and there being no submissions received, hereby resolves to adopt the policy

 


DIRECTOR Planning & Community Phil Turner

 

Draft Maroondah Children's Plan 2015-2019

Item 4

 

Purpose

The purpose of this report is to seek Councils adoption of the Maroondah Children’s Plan 2015 – 2019.

Strategic / policy issues

The following directions contained in Maroondah 2040: Our Future Together and the Council Plan 2013-2017 (Year 3: 2015-2016) provide the strategic framework that underpins the purpose of this report.

Outcome Area:

A safe, healthy and activity community.

Our Vision:

In 2040, Maroondah will be a safe, healthy and activity community with local opportunities provided for all people of all ages and abilities to have high levels of social, emotional and physical wellbeing.

Key Directions 2015-2016:

1.14   Ensure that all young people and their families in Maroondah have access to affordable childcare, education, health and leisure services.

Priority Action 2015-2016:

Develop a new Maroondah Children’s Plan incorporating the Municipal Early Years Plan.

Background

The Maroondah Children’s Plan 2015-2019 has been developed in line with the recommendation from the Municipal Association of Victoria for all Councils in Victoria to develop a Municipal Early Years Plan. Maroondah has decided to call this document a Children’s Plan to ensure that the community is clear about the intent of the document. The Maroondah Children’s Plan is designed to provide Council’s strategic development and commitment to excellence in ensuring the care, education and health needs of children aged

0 to 12 across the municipality. This Plan builds on previous Early Years Plans and also includes children aged 7 to 12 years of age.

 

Council recognises that service delivery is about more than just service, it is about supporting positive connections in the community and developing connections which will enable the health, care, educational and social needs of children to be meet within the context of their family.


The Maroondah Children’s Plan is designed to:

·        Increase support for young children and their families

·        Focus attention on vulnerable families

·        Promote ease of access to services

·        Increase service integration and collaboration

Maroondah City Council developed its first Municipal Early Years Plan in 2004/2005. The current plan has been reviewed resulting in the development of the Maroondah Children’s Plan 2015-2019.

 

The Maroondah Children’s Plan has been developed after considerable community consultation and research into the key health, development and wellbeing issues currently affecting children and their families.  The Plan is also guided by research into population and in the context of local, State and Federal Government policies. The Plan has been mindful of the Victorian Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities 2006, and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

 

The Plan was developed in consultation with key stakeholders including community members, children and parents, family service providers, government agencies and Maroondah City Council staff. In addition, the process also provided plenty of opportunity for children’s voices to be heard from across all areas of the community.

 

Broad community consultations were undertaken to identify key health, development and wellbeing issues. The primary data gathered from these consultations has been analysed and compared to a range of secondary data gathered from literature sources and Australian data collections. The results of this research provide an evidence base for the Children’s Plan and helped to determine its priorities, goals and strategies.

 

Throughout the community consultation a strong theme emerged on the need to build and facilitate connections. This includes connections of families and services, connections of children with each other, cross cultural connections and intergenerational connections.

 

Service providers worked closely with Council officers to develop the key themes that emerged as a result of the consultation.

 

Six focus areas have been identified to drive the delivery of this Plan:

·        Information and Communication

·        Places and Spaces

·        Supporting Families

·        Involvement and Community Building

·        Engagement and Governance

·        Service Provision

Issue / discussion

Council at its meeting on 22 June 2015 resolved to place the draft Maroondah Children’s Plan 2015 – 2019 on public exhibition from 29 June - 13 July 2015. The Plan was advertised in the Leader Newspaper and on Councils website, with copies also made available at Croydon and Ringwood Council offices and libraries. No submissions have been received.

Financial / economic issues

Council plays a key role in planning services for children, some services are directly provided by Council, with yet other services coordinated and supported by Council. Council is also responsible for providing and maintaining many facilities from which children’s services operates.

 

A community’s social capital or wealth and wellbeing are dependent on the capability of its citizens. There is a strong body of evidence to suggest that sound investment in the early years will have substantial returns in later life.

Environmental / amenity issues

Not Applicable

Social / community issues

The Plan outlines how Council will work to enhance the lives of children and families living in the municipality and highlights the need for places and spaces to enhance social connection. Fostering connection between children and families builds a healthy community. Consultation indicated a need to provide support for parents in Maroondah. This included the opportunity for parents to meet, support and educate.

 

Consultation with children highlighted five key themes. A place to play, a green place for animals, plants and me, a healthy happy and friendly place, a place to ride, walk, drive and go and a place to create. These themes indicate an interest and desire for outside active play, love of parks, playgrounds and sporting facilities.

 

Evidence shows that connection to community is a protective factor in building resilience in children. When children were asked about areas of improvement they indicated that they would like to see less litter and graffiti and the need to be kind to each other. Some children also had concerns about personal safety and traffic safety particularly in relation to crossing roads and safety accessing parks.

 

This strong emphasis on the need for connection included connections of families and services, connection of children with each other, cross cultural connections and intergenerational connections.

Community consultation

In 2014 Maroondah Council engaged with service providers and communities throughout the municipality to identify the main factors and issues that people considered most important for health, development and wellbeing of children and families. A range of consultation methods were used. The methods included:

·        Consultations with Maroondah City Council teams from the following areas; Aged & Disability, Community Health, Maternal Child & Health, Youth Services, Assets, Arts & Culture, Local Laws, Strategic Planning, Community Planning & Development, Maroondah Leisure, Information Technology, Maroondah Leisure, Open Space & Children’s Services.

·        Stakeholder workshops for service providers and agencies located in, or servicing, the City of Maroondah (approximately 130 community groups and organizations)

·        Grandparents, older residents, first time parents and families, cultural and disability groups and young people.

·        Online community survey of Maroondah parents

·        Consultation with 150 children at Maroondah Festival and additional other events.

An analysis of the consultation data was conducted. Overall the areas viewed as having the greatest impact on the health, development and wellbeing for children, families and the community in Maroondah were: care, health, inclusion, leisure and open spaces, development, referrals and early intervention, education and networks and linkages.

Conclusion

Following the recent public exhibition of the draft Maroondah Children’s Plan 2015 – 2019 and there being no submissions received, it is now appropriate to formally adopt the Plan.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Draft Maroondah Children's Plan June 2015-2019

CONFIDENTIALITY

Not Applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION


That COUNCIL, having placed the draft maroondah children’s plan 2015–2019 on public EXHIBITION FROM 29 JUNE TO 13 JULY 2015, and there being no submissions received, hereby resolves to adopt the plan.